Inspiration: Gillette Castle

If you're ever in Connecticut this is a must-see. Something like 75 doors, all different, each with a wooden latch, and the latches are all different, and after almost a hundred years, they all still work. Also wooden light switches, window latches, and a card table with built-in cat toys, among other features.
I was up there Sunday and got pictures of some of them, and some of the other details, before my battery died.
William Gillette, for those who don't know of him, was the actor who created the image which we normally associate with Sherlock Holmes--a lot of the details of attire and personal style didn't appear in Conan Doyle's work but were created on the stage by William Gillette.
Gillette Castle was his house in Connecticut--it's not all that large, but definitely unique. He used to have 3 miles of track and a steam locomotive, but those were sold to an amusement park long ago.
The photos I've got are at http://www.flickr.com/photos/39383723@N00/sets/72157600350078202 /.
The official site is http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?A '16&Q25204.
If you search flickr.com on keywords "gillette castle" there are 758 photos of the castle and its environs up, not a lot of the details of the woodwork though.
One of these days I'm going back with a more capable camera. Would be fun to get permission from the Powers That Be and do a photo shoot with tripod and proper lighting, but don't known when I would get to that.
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If you do go back try to ride the ferry across the river , it's a nice trip.
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beecrofter wrote:

Did that going home. Good view of the castle from the ferry.
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<<If you're ever in Connecticut this is a must-see. Something like 75 doors, all different, each with a wooden latch, and the latches are all different, and after almost a hundred years, they all still work. Also wooden light switches, window latches, and a card table with built-in cat toys, among other features.>>
The place was damn near destroyed from neglect a few years ago. In their usual zeal to save money, state officials scrimped on budget for maintenance and eventually the roof failed and there was major water damage inside. They had to close the place down for several years to make repairs and, as you stated, all the doors are one-offs and each one needed custom repairs, as did the extensive woodwork throughout the place.
Lee
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It's a shame, that when they rebuilt the place, they used a stone mason that didn't have a clue how to repair the walls of the house properly. All of the stone work on the outside of Gillette Castle used to look like the ornamental walls that are around it with the mortar between the stones almost invisible and the stones themselves placed very tightly together. After they rebuilt the place it looks like an amateur stone mason did it. The stones no longer fit closely together and the mortar between them has become the most visible feature. Still, the place is very interesting, especially for a woodworker. Even the light switches in the walls are covered with custom made wood handles, no 2 doors are alike, and much of the furniture is custom made to match the decor of the place. It's a bit creepy, but very interesting.
Charley

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