Ink under Shellac

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I've heard about a very similar method using regular paper and a laser printer to make printed circuit board traces. The pattern is printed backwards and then ironed on before etching. (They might have even used glossy photo paper.)
That gives me an idea. Rather than write on the wood, write on a business card and use the shellac to adhere the card to the work. Sanding/routing a little recess for the card wouldn't take long, and should be completly legible.
Quickly Robin, to the bat cave!
Puckdropper
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

PD:
If we're going that way, try a label maker. If you don't cotton to all the extra tape background, Xacto. Also, maybe you just want the letter forms without the label. Put the lettered label on. Take a pin. Punch through the letters carefully. Go for the stippled effect with paint after wiping or use the holes as a carving guide.
Stencil cutting or stencil-cutting machines add another option to the field. By cutting a machine stencil of your expression and adding light spray paint coats, you can have a sterling result if you assure a crisp contact of stencil and wood.
Artists normally seal calligraphy with a fixative spray in gloss or matte finish. It is designed to prevent pigment and dye deckling. Whether it works on all media--or under shellac--will be a matter of trial.
Personally, I'd be a big fan of paint in this application.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Or he could just find a "Things Remembered" and for 10 bucks or so have them make up a nice little brass plate with the information on it.
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On Apr 30, 5:10 am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

You can also transfer the image by wiping the back of the copy with an acetone-soaked rag.
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

A few things you might consider trying:
. Burn in the inscription with a fine tipped soldering iron instead of using ink or paint. . Try using a UniBall 207 pen. The ink, once dry, does not bleed in water or various organic solvents. Try it out on paper first just to be sure. Full drying takes a few seconds. . Use a dark pencil. I typically use this technique and I put a coat of shellac on top. The pencil line will not fade and it does not dissolve in shellac.
Good Luck.
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On Apr 28, 8:40 am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Paint and a fine model brush. Luthiers using shellac have a similar problem. Alcohol makes dark oily woods such as rosewood bleed, which can spoil a nice purfling job. Trick is seal the wood with a couple of spit coats of 1 lb wiped on with a rag, being sure not to go back over any areas unless they're dry, and to change the rag the second it shows a hint of stain. Goes a lot faster than it sounds.
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