Info on latex paint

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There is a lot of mention of the us of latex paint. I have never come across latex paint here (South Africa). Phoned one of the major paint companies today. The only latex paint they have is for coating the inside of spray booths. When covered with overspray it is peeled off and recoated. What is the latex paint that is so often mentioned? What is it used for? What is the thinner?
Just need to know <G> Thanks
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Phillip Hansen
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"Phil Hansen" writes:

<snip>
Latex paint is a water based rather than an oil based product.
Believe it or not, it was introduced right after WWII as an interior flat finish product for houses.
Those early efforts were to say the least, less than spectacular.
Latex paints have come a long way since then.
Today they are the primary paint for the architectural market. (Houses, industrial buildings, etc)
Latex is replacing oil based paint almost everywhere in the US, because of environmental issues.
Latex forms a skins and bonds to the surface as opposed to oil based which penetrates the surface when forming a bond.
I'm not a paint chemist so some of the details might not be totally up to snuff, but the general idea is accurate.
HTH
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Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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In America it is quite common to use latex paint on the interiors and exteriors of houses. It is thinned with ordinary water, so it's a do-it-yourself project to paint your own house with it. We don't strip the old paint off, just paint a new color over the old. It's available in any color you want, but the most common are light pastels. It's quite inexpensive unless you want the 'designer' brands like Ralph Lauren.
Karl
Phil Hansen wrote:

of
for
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What people have failed to mention to you, is that latex paint cleans up with water. That's as long as the paint hasn't completely dried. That means that your brushes, your hands, your paint tray all clean up with a little rubbing by running them under the water tap. That's its biggest benefit as far as I'm concerned.
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means
Personally I will prefer oil based clean up as opposed to latex clean up.
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Could you be more specific as to why? I could see someone arguing as to the performance of an oil based paint, but how could the cleanup be easier/better for oil-based paint? Even if you dont mind the smell of paint thinner, there is still the fact that you cant pour the excess paint or dirty thinner down the drain without breaking laws in just about every state. (Not to mention polluting).
Why do you prefer the oil-based cleanup?
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David W. Lovell
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the
paint
In the beginning, I hated the thought of dealing with oil based paints until I painted a couple of houses. To address the waste, I live in Houston TX, we have centers to deposit the waste thinner at no charge. With that in mind, having helped a friend paint house interiors for the last 7 years, I have found that cleaning a brush regularly during the day, "at least at lunch time and the end of the day", dropping the brush in 2 separate cans of thinner and then rinsing the brush in soap and water takes about 3 minutes for a totally clean brush. We can make a gallon of thinner last a week when painting every day. When using brushes to cut in the walls with latex paint, the clean up normally takes 3 time longer with soap and water. The thinner on oil based paints takes the work out of clean up. Additionally, when actually painting and you have the inevitable spatter or drip on the floor, oil based wipes up immediately with a thinner soaked rag as opposed to latex smearing around with a wet rag. I'll take a small oil based cleanup on carpet any day over the same clean up with latex paint.
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I've found that preconditioning the brush prior to dipping into the finish is a BIG step in cleaning as well as preventing the bristles from stiffening by stopping the finish from drying near the ferrule. I was raised used oil based stuff as that is what was available and early WB stuff was a giant step backwards. Not so today! WB stuff works now and is what I've switched to. Still have MS on the shelf for infrequent needs.
On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 16:11:09 GMT, "Leon"

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Yeah I do that too, really helps the paint flow off the brush. I find that Wooster brushes have good seals and don't let the water or thinner run down the brush handle if you get too much on the brush. Oddly, Purdy lets lots of thinner or water run down the handle. I suspect they have no seal.
wrote:

day",
brush
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Leon wrote:

Let the paint settle out, decant the thinner. It works as well as fresh for cleaning the brush. With care, you won't have any thinner to dump; it'll all evaporate by the time you need a new can.

Oil-based color is richer, deeper than latex. WAY richer and deeper. You'd expect it from pigmented varnish compared to pigmented rubber.
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That is why I use 2 Coffee cans of thinner, 1 for the initial clean up and the second for the final cleaning. The second one gets dumped into the first on the next day and filled fresh again.

You'd
Sticks better too IMHO. Also IMHO you can scrub it harder after it has cured.
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Sun, Jul 25, 2004, 3:23pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@hell.gov (FatherHaskell) claims: Oil-based color is richer, deeper than latex. WAY richer and deeper. You'd expect it from pigmented varnish compared to pigmented rubber.
Dunno about that, but oil-based works much better on painting my tools than latex. Use latex for about everyting else.
JOAT Expensive tennis shoes won't cure a sore toe. - Bazooka Joe THE NEW COPPERPLATE http://www.banjer.com/midi/newcopp.mid
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says...

It is possible that, if you in South Africa follow the British conventions, the water based latex paint would be called emulsion.
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MikeG
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snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.ent says...

Thanks for that. That would equate to what we call PVA. A water based interior and exterior paint.
Thanks to all the others who replied
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Phillip Hansen
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When it was first introduced, I remember it was referred to as "rubber based" paint as opposed to "oil based paint". Now it is called "acrylic latex paint" versus "alkyd oil paint". Names tend to vary in different regions of the world. Latex is thinned and washed up with water, oil paint is thinned and washed up with solvent.
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G'day Phil,
we call latex "acrylic" which is described as"
"Acrylic paints are a synthetic media made by suspending pigment in synthetic polymer emulsified by water. They are essentially plastic paints that are water-soluble and have good adhesive qualities. They are very stable. They resist oxidization and chemical decomposition, and will not yellow over time."
SA and OZ are somewhat similar so I expect you use the same name.
cheers,
Greg
"Phil Hansen" wrote in message ...

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

And to you too mate, It's funny but it seems every continent has its own naming convention for the same thing. Latex Acrylic PVA Emulsion. I wondered why somebody would paint their house with what we would use to line a spray booth! Anyway now I know. <G>
BTW The last time I heard from you we could not play cricket. This time we cannot play rugby. Are these well timed pokes / responses? <G> Cheers
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Phillip Hansen
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Sun, Jul 25, 2004, 6:29pm (EDT+6) snipped-for-privacy@home.za (PhilHansen) says: <snip> It's funny but it seems every continent has its own naming convention for the same thing. Latex Acrylic PVA Emulsion.<snip>
And, yet we're all speaking English. LMAO
JOAT Expensive tennis shoes won't cure a sore toe. - Bazooka Joe THE NEW COPPERPLATE http://www.banjer.com/midi/newcopp.mid
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PVA means poly-vinyl-acetate to me. That nasty old white glue that everyone sells for too much money for the performance you get out of it.
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white glue, yup.
also the gazillion other members of that chemical family tree, ranging from some really expensive archival grade adhesives to yellow glue to, yes, latex paint
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