In you have been waiting to pull the trigger on Festool

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wrote:

I can see that, I dont think I have ever used the Domino indexing pins for spacing from existing mortises.

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On 09 Oct 2009 23:29:53 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

And total time needed to make one? You need to factor in everything when you're calculating your numbers. But, I have to agree, it's an expensive version of a simple sanding block would be sufficient in 99% of most cases.
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snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com writes:

15 or 20 minutes to make several (mill a single 3' 2x4, glue the cork to it, cross cut to desired length, presto 9 or 10 blocks; enough for one per grit. Takes longer to let the glue dry.
scott
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On Fri, 9 Oct 2009 15:39:27 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

I was thinking about that the other day. There are a few things that the table saw can do that the track saw can't.
Running a dado blade was the first thing I thought of. Second was the fact that many times when I cut something, I like to cut it oversize and then sneak up on the final cut. That process has a significant visual aspect to it and I suspect that would be pretty difficult with the track saw. Then there's the need for cutting thinker pieces of stock. I don't remember exactly the maximum cutting capability of the track saw, but it's certainly much less than say a 10" blade in a table saw.
I understand your angst, but I do believe there's a number of things the table saw is capable of doing that the track saw would fail miserably at. I think it's closer to being a niche market tool, although most certainly a very capable one.
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I pinged you with a link to Festool links. There are literally hundreds of reviews and videos of Festool products sorted by type of work. There is bound to be an answer to all of your questions about any Festool.
I am happy however to answer any of your questions that I can.
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On Oct 10, 3:34am, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

The 75 model will cut thick stock...as thick as I will ever use, The dado is handled by the OF2000 router, using the same track. But... I know what you're saying. The tracksaw is not a panacea.
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On Oct 10, 3:34am, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

Perhaps. Or maybe you'd learn to stop sneaking around and just cut the damn thing once. ;)

The Festool TS75 has a 8.25" blade and a cut depth of 2.75" while on the track. A 10" Delta TS has a 3.25" depth of cut. That can be a significant difference, but I don't know if it qualifies for "much less".

Yes, it's a niche tool - and the niche is woodworking.
R
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On Oct 10, 3:34am, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

Perhaps. Or maybe you'd learn to stop sneaking around and just cut the damn thing once. ;)

The Festool TS75 has a 8.25" blade and a cut depth of 2.75" while on the track. A 10" Delta TS has a 3.25" depth of cut. That can be a significant difference, but I don't know if it qualifies for "much less".

Yes, it's a niche tool - and the niche is woodworking.
R
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I just ran across another Festool, the AP85 (older model or overseas model, perhaps), that has a 3.35" depth of cut.
R
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wrote:

Leon, I wanted to ask you. Recent advertising for the Domino advertises a 'Plus' version and some new attachments. Have you looked at these new differences between your Domino and the new version?
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IIRC the Plus that you are referering to is the Domino FD500 Q "Set". The set is the Domino FD500 Q "plus" the "cross stop" and the "trim stop".
Yes, I bought the domino FD 500 Q Set with those accessories. And yes IMHO they are worth having. The trim stop aids in cutting mortises in the ends of thin stock, too narrow to index against the indexing pins. The cross stop lets you accurately index farther away from the corner edge of the wood and or make mortises with indexed spacing farther apart than the indexing pins on the Domino allow.
The original Domino and the cross stop accessory use a spring loaded retracting steel dowel for indexing against the edge of the wood or inside a previousely drilled mortise. The current version of the Domino seems to have a revamped indexng system that replaced the retracting dowel with what appears to be a spring loaded retractable lever. The cross stop appears to continue to use the spring loaded retractable steel dowel.
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hmmmmmmmm 574216    Router OF 2000 E    $475.00    $380.00
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wrote:

hmmmmmmmm 574216 Router OF 2000 E $475.00 $380.00
Yeah.. hummmmmmmm and the Domino is reduced quite a bit also. Although it may be the first design.
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If you figure that the Milwaukee 5625 is around 300 dollars...that 80 buck difference is quickly found in MY pocket. *S* I know somebody who has that 2000 watt Festool router...and I have handled it, used it a bit...and I tell you...smooooooth and gobs of power...GOBS I tell ya! GOBS!
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wrote:

Looked to me to be about a 10% reduction. Not sure it would be worth it if it was the first design. If someone's got the money to throw at Festool, then I'd think they're not concerned much with a 10% cost difference.
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Then again, looking at the owners manual I caonnot see the advantage to the changed indexing system. It appears that possibly you would have to purchase the cross stop accessory if you want to index farther in from the edge of the board than what the Domino will do by itself. With the original version you could use the Domino index pins in previousely cut mortises, I am not sure that is possible with the new indexing tabs. It may be a kind of similar situation with the PC 557 plate joiner. Type 1 was OK, Type 2 was implemented because of a patent infringement and basically sucked, Type 3 fixed Type 2 problems. All specualtuon bit sometimes changes are not always for the good of the consumer.
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[snip]
*coughs* David Eisan, the wRECker from way back, now carries Festool. That is becoming a very dangerous stretch of road he's on. Federated Tool now selling General, MiniMax, Festool....., then further down the road Gorilla CNC, then the BMW motorcycle dealer, then Lee Valley...all within a couple of miles. Danger, danger..lock up your credit cards and cheque books....
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Robatoy wrote:

Didn't see you standing therrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. Oooh that's gonna leave a mark. Just kiddinggggggg! Honest!! Erggg.
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