If You Label, They Will Crush

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"Damage noted," he said. http://photobucket.com/albums/d160/GoodOnesGone/?action=view&current 1f11ee.jpg
The glasses made it fine, even though someone packing for Lee Valley threw a cast iron gingerbread pan in to bounce about and bash the other items. A bit of bubble wrap would have been nice, but newsprint - now tightly compressed - was all they used. Lots of dust, too.
Fed Ex sure learned a lot from the USPS.
Worst part - none of it was for me....
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The packing job was simply not up to the task. "LeeValley" tape is way too short over the ends and the box is too light. I'm surprised.
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Product arrived with no damage. Packaging worked perfectly. The standard for tape over the end is 2" Anything more is a waste of tape. Plain paper tape must be in an H pattern, but reinforced tape is OK with one strip. Carton is to specifications as required by UPS and the NSTA.
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wrote in message

Well that box wouldn't have made it much further. It may be to someone's specification but it's not good enough
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wrote in message

For a lot of years, I'd get tools shipped from Taiwan (pre-mainland) to the West Coast to here, about a 6000 mile journey. I'd then have to repack and return the tools after testing. Biggest problem: the original cartons were designed to go 6000 miles. They might make 6500. Ask them for 9000, and the contents would spill out all over something or other. So I too often had to rebuild the cartons out of tape and cardboard.
You used to be able to pretty much pinpoint the origin from the color of the corrugated cardboard. The Asian cardboard had a really nasty yellowish color. I have no idea what the differences in the mixtures were, or are, but the current cartons are 100% better, even from the mainland Chinese factories. The Taiwanese tools are at least 100% better, too.
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On Thu, 01 Dec 2005 11:07:28 GMT, "Charles Self"

We'd see that at the bicycle shop, too.
You're probably also familiar with what we'd call "Chinese Factory Stank". The mixture of cutting oil, paint fumes, container ship stank, boiled goat glue, that nasty yellow cardboard, and possibly the sweat of 10 year old workers, that is unmistakably bad when the box is left open indoors.
American, Mexican, European, and even some Taiwan originating stuff just dosen't have the same bouquet when the box is cracked open. <G>
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On Thu, 01 Dec 2005 11:07:28 GMT, "Charles Self"

You should have seen '70s-'80s Soviet cardboard. Nothing else like it. it wasn't too bad when it was dry, it was thicker than anyone else's ,because it was the only way to get any strength. Wet though, the stuff was like soggy tissue. It must have been recycled out of old recyclings and the fibres were just too short to have any wet strength left.
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Ever notice that any book printed on slick paper, much less coated, was printed in Finland, not USSR? They were cheap, of course.
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Not good enough for what? As I said before: Product arrived with no damage. Packaging worked perfectly.
Nothing else matters. Nothing. Seems to me it is the ideal cost effective package and it did the job it was supposed to do. Nothing else matters. (BTW, I've been involved in the packaging industry for 35 years. The goal is for the product to arrive intact.)
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wrote:

There seems to be a consumer belief that if the one-time use box has any visible damage, it wasn't a good package. A package with crumple zones and impact absorbing material is far better than a "strong" box. I've unpacked plenty of broken goods from perfect boxes.
On the other hand, I'm surprised that none of the manufacturers build decent reusable containers for demo and review machines, like the stuff that gets shipped to Charlie or FWW. It would seem that some sort of reusable flight case or crate would help their machines travel safely. Once a machine has done the rounds, they could always refit the case for a similar tool.
The lab I work in frequently sees demo electronic equipment, some of which is the size and weight of a good sized 'fridge, and it's never shipped in one-time, production style packaging.
Barry
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Ba r r y wrote:

I used to work for a group at NASA'a Goddard Space Flight Center that used radio telescopes all over the world. As part of that project
we loaned some of the equipment that was used for the observing campaigns and had custom-made reusable shipping containers built of plywood for that equipment.
At one of our weekly meetings we were informed that shipping of something ( ISTR it was an atomic clock) from Hat Creek, California to Arecibo, Puerto Rico, was delayed because the porcupines had eaten the packing crates.
--

FF


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Well, the machines I just shipped back were all in wooden crates, including one that was framed in steel. But those are still one time use crates, though one helluvan improvement over what I was getting just five years ago.
Part of this is probably economy. Part of it is simply to indicate that there are no special tricks applied to the tools to be reviewed. Unopened packages of standard design.
And, honestly, with on jointer that just went back, I would not WANT the crate any heavier. It comes assembled, and is claimed to weigh about 750 pounds crated, about 100 pounds less uncrated.
More like 875 pounds crated, I think. But even if it's only 800, that's more than sufficient for two fat old guys to unload, uncrate and fiddle with and recrate and return. Like to killed our sorry butts even with my wife helping on the outbound leg...always marry a farm girl. They know how to work.
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On Thu, 01 Dec 2005 16:36:33 GMT, "Charles Self"

Well-built Calzone or Anvil cases can be surprisingly light.
Barry
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wrote:

Yeah, but...this crate was well built, but it was also about 1-1/2" shy of 8' long and over 2' wide, and, though I didn't check the height, it was tall, chest high to me...I'm not 6'2" any more, but I'm still over 6'. Rough guess has the crate weighing 150 pounds, minimum. And I added 2x4 runners so it would move on rollers. Those ran at right angles to the skid pieces, because I needed to get this sucker into my buddy's pick-up long ways. No way it would fit otherwise. While I had it on the engine crane--this may have been an inspired purchase nearly a decade ago for $140 or so--with the crate base bolted onto the jointer, I simply placed a runner on one side, blocked it solid and nailed, and repeated the process. After that, three of us could do the loading a lot more easily than two of us did the unloading.
Suggestion for those making their own pipe rollers: 1-1/2" or 1-1/4" OD is best. 3/4" is nearly worthless. Six rollers will move just about anything, and make each roller about 42-43" long.
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wrote:

===>MMMmmmmh! Calzones. Just like momma used to make. Don't believe she shipped any, though!*G*
Leif
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On Thu, 01 Dec 2005 16:36:33 GMT, "Charles Self"

Amen, Brother! Farm girls are the best, not only do they know how to work but they have other attributes as well - some of which can be discussed in a public forum. I married one of the best of the breed and haven't paid for beef in almost 20 years!
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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wrote:

Yeah. And not lazy. My wife isn't working right now, so she worked a garden, canned us about 50 quarts of green beans (not counting what we ate for months), did probably another two dozen for family, lots of other edibles, tomatoes until my mouth got sore from the acid, probably 40 quarts of tomatoes canned and remaining, I don't know how much strawberry preserves, peach preserves and blueberry preserves, but a lot. Plus zucchini, green peppers, red peppers, and a slew of other stuff. She also got some pick-ur-own apples and made applesauce and apple butter.
Sort of like turning into my own grandfather, except I never had a dozen kids. Actually, I guess they had 14, one of those early 20th century farm families (my oldest uncle was born in 1900, straddled two centuries within a few months, as did my father, who was born the same year).
Near Walton's Mountain (which doesn't exist), but, as my mother used to say, we had the sawmill and farm, and some of the kids got to college, but, as kids, none had a car, and there was a lot less noise and hassle, and money, around the house.
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Would you have packaged an eight-pound piece of iron unrestrained in a package containing glasses and bubble-wrapped plastic items? Sorry, this is in the dumb luck category, not the good enough
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Nothing damaged. The packaging did its job. Does it look pretty? Probably not, but there is no damage, no harm, no loss of anything. Life is good.
By glasses, do you mean the dozen beer glasses that have been on test for 20 years? Very nice, I like them. Last year, mine arrived in the same package as my 30 pound vice and yes, nothing was broken.
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wrote in message

That's them. Smashed along one side, but the box they were in didn't deform so much that they crushed. Had it been the top versus the bottom that crushed - well who knows.
Hope their durability continues. They're for the kids, who are still slim enough to drink beer.
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