If you don't have one....

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If you don't have one, they are on sale with free shipping. I know Fein is a superior quality tool but....
(Amazon.com product link shortened)69086724/ref=sr_1_628/104-7821139-9460756?ie=UTF8&s=hi
Allen
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Allen Roy wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)69086724/ref=sr_1_628/104-7821139-9460756?ie=UTF8&s=hi
They're out of stock! Must have sold out right away at that price. Forget it. Oh, well, guess I'll keep the Sawzall after all. Andy
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wrote:

I'd bet an awful lot that the price tag has *everything* to do with the fact that it's designed to be used in an environment that must be spark-free. All that stuff costs a lot of $$$, even the wrenches.
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Inquiring minds want to know how carbon brushes and standard commutation produce no sparks. The area is ventilated to cool it, rather than shielding from sparks, so must be some exotic beryllium alloy on the commutator bars?
http://www.feinus.com/p/pdf/astx649_hacksaw_breakdown.pdf
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wrote in message>

I am convinced that it is magic that prevents sparks!
The same question can be asked and I did ask an Oldsmobile factory rep how an electric fuel pump submerged in gasoline inside a fuel tank does not cause an esplosion. He gave me a "totally lost" look.
The fuel pumps actually had gasoline flow through the center of the motor and past the brushes. Old motors with worn out brushes were spotless inside. I can understand how there would not be a problem when the motor is submerged but what changes when you run out of gasoline?
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wrote in message

Perhaps that's why the pump is located in a standpipe well?
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The electric pump is attached directly to the tank meter fuel line on one end and has the primary tank sock/strainer attached to the other end. This all hangs from the tank unit inside the fuel tank.
As long as the sock is submerged the pump pumps gasoline. The sock is no longer submerged when you are very low on fuel. The motor/pump is above the fuel level before the sock is above the fuel surface.
There must be some kind of ground to prevent arcing from the brushes but when I cut one open to see how it worked I saw no sign of any thing except worn out brushes. Clean as a whistle inside. Go figure. Its magic I tell you. ;~)
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The part I liked was that, when the pressure dropped below some preset point, it all shut down, clean as a whistle. And it cost some serious change to get a new pump installed. But that fixed the problem, I'm told.
Good thing I trust my mechanic.
Patriarch
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The older units would continue to run, out of fuel or not. That is what mine would do. I replaced the one on my 1975 Olds Starfire befor going to work at the Olds dealer. I was sorta woried about connecting all the wiring back correctly although IIRC there were only 2 wires.
And it cost some serious

A lot of trouble if the pump went bad and the tank was full of gasoline. The tanks had to be dropped so that you could get to the top and remove the tank unit.
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On Thu, 18 Jan 2007 14:07:12 GMT, "Leon"

I believe this is because a 12 volt spark will not develop enough energy to be hot enough to ignite the fuel or vapors.
That's why the easiest way to achieve intrinsically safe rating on electrical stuff is to keep it below (IIRC) 24 volts.
Paul Franklin
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No, a spark is hot, light emitting hot.
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No.
this is because a 12 volt spark will not develop enough

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I'll take a shot at that one. A few shots actually. First, the submersed electric fuel pumps that I am familiar with, used on some GM vehicles, don't use brushes. Even if they did, gasoline requires oxygen to burn (or explode, which is actually pretty rare except in movies & TV) There is not enough 02 dissolved in gasoline to support combustion, let alone explosion. I never really thought about it before, but with fuel system design today, it would be pretty tough to get enough air inside a gas tank to support a fire inside the tank. Of course, someone could forget the gas cap, but even so, it would be unlikely.
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snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote in

If someone forgot the gas cap, a yellow light with a funny shape comes on and a little bell dings... Well, at least on my mother's minivan. If you look in the manual, I'm sure it says to take the vehicle to the dealer soon when that light comes on. What's wrong with having a "check gas cap" light?
Puckdropper
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Some do. My LeSabre has a message on the computer that reads "check gas cap" Once you do, it takes about 15 starts for the code to go away.
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Subaru has a "check engine" light. It appears to monitor the gas cap. Light comes on, check gas cap. If cap is present and tight, replace with new one. Light goes out. Never seen "check engine" light come on for any other reason.
wrote in message

on
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Bad emission sensors will do the same thing. ... and the light doesn't go out until you get them replaced. Unfortunately, if you live in an emission inspection county, you have to have them replaced in order to pass inspection.

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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<...snipped...>

Or "fortunately" if you happen to breathe air LOL.
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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wrote:

2004 Ranger is smarter than I too.
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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Brushless DC possible with modern electronics, of course. It'd be my choice.
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