Idea for cribbage board hole jig

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A friend and I were discussing ways to drill cribbage board holes with reasonable accuracy, and this is what I came up with. Remembering that there was some discussion about this on the wreck, I thought I'd post it here.
In case it isn't self explanatory, here are a few salient points.
This will only work for holes that go all the way through, though it's not difficult to imagine building it to allow the board to be underneath the jig,
The large top piece is the jig itself, and the 6 pieces below it represent the board, moved along for each hole to be drilled.
The jig should be clamped to the drill press table, and should have a fence to set the position of the line of holes.
The first hole is drilled wherever you want to start, and the next 4 are drilled by using a pin through hole 'b' and the previous board hole.
The 6th hole is positioned by putting the pin through hole 'a' and the first hole drilled in the board. All subsequent holes in the line are positioned using hole 'a', ensuring proper spacing for both individual holes and hole groups.
Any and all critiques are welcome.
Larry
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It's easy enough to modify the jig for a drop-pin to align the holes without drilling through. Bugs
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Simply buy a cheap Cribbage game in the layout that you like and use the game board for the template. Double stick tape it on top to the piece you will be making and drill through the game board holes. Let the game board that you bought be the template guide.

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The Leon entity posted thusly:

I thought of that, but one of the problems I always have is positioning the piece accurately enough. Every time I move the piece to a new position, I stand the chance of having the drill bit wear the hole in the pattern. I was looking for a way to avoid having to use the pattern holes in that manner.
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If you are using a drill press it should not be an issue unless you plan on making 100's and in that case make several master templates.
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Thu, Jan 26, 2006, 10:35am (EST-1) snipped-for-privacy@spamslam.com (OlegLego) did post Leon's reply like this: The Leon entity posted thusly: Simply buy a cheap Cribbage game in the layout that you like and use the game board for the template. Double stick tape it on top to the piece you will be making and drill through the game board holes. Let the game board that you bought be the template guide.
And then decided to say: I thought of that, but one of the problems I always have is positioning the piece accurately enough. Every time I move the piece to a new position, I stand the chance of having the drill bit wear the hole in the pattern. I was looking for a way to avoid having to use the pattern holes in that manner.
Drill bit wear the hole. Hmmm. The few times I'm faced with using a previously drilled hole as a guide, I turn the drill off, lower the bit until it's centered in the hole, THEN turn the drill back on and drill. You mean you don't turn the drill off?
JOAT You only need two tools: WD-40, and duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the tape.
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The J T entity posted thusly:

Exactly. At my age, turning the drill off to align each of the 390 or so holes might mean the difference between getting to play a game on it or having the unfinished project inlaid into my coffin lid.
--
I want to die peacefully, in my sleep, like
my grandfather, not screaming in terror,
  Click to see the full signature.
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"Oleg Lego"

snip
I did mine with one of these. http://stores.ebay.com/Cribbage-Craft
I worked very well.
Dave
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<snip>
Should work, but a word of caution (based on my experience with a similar jig): Be VERY careful that the jig and workpiece stay very tight to the fence. Get a shaving between the workpiece and the fence, and you will create an error in that hole, which will start compounding when that hole is used as the reverence hole on the peg. I'd suggest filing off the side of the peg farthest from the fence so that you can always keep the workpiece tight to the fence (but don't create slop in the direction along the fence.
Here's an alternative, how I would probably do it:
cut a stop block and six spader blocks: 1 width spacer is the length of the workpiece, and the width of the distance between centers of the two rows of holes. 1 group spacer is the length of the distance between groups of holes 4 hole spacers are the length of the distance between holes (I'd make these by ripping, then thicknessing a piece to desired spacing, then cutting into 4 blocks.
To use, set the stop block on the left, and move the fence back to register for the row of holes farthest from the fence. Align the stop block to target the hole farthest from the block. So if the stop block is on your left, you will first drill the lowest right-hand hole. Then insert the width spacer to drill the opposite hole, insert one of hole spacers between the workpiece and the stop block, drill, remove the width spacer, drill, ... ending up with the group spacer to drill the first pair of holes in the next group. Then with the workpiece held steady, remove the spacers and register the stop block to the workpiece, clamp it, and with the drill off confirm that the bit is still registered to the last hole you drilled. Then repeat.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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"reference hole", obviously! Gotta fine won of those spell checkers that can reed my mine.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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The alexy entity posted thusly:

... instructions snipped ...
Sounds like a good method. Thanks!
Larry
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The comment about wood chips under the jig is very good. I have learned to cut some chip clearance on the jig corners and keep shop air handy for keeping the jig clear. Bugs
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Larry, I designed such a setup using computer CAD program. It puts a + sign at center of each hole. I print that, spray stick to board and drill into each +.
Thats the easy part, my challenge is how do you color each players path differently ? I want peg setup for 3 players, each having different colored wood for their path. I have not figured out how to cut these on scrollsaw? or other? to get a seamless path.
No kidding, send over the board dims and I would be happy to layout the pattern for you and email back a jpeg.
Thoughts ? Tom
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Can you explaian how you did this, or give some more info. I'd like to do the same thing.

John Hewitt, Malaga, Spain
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The snipped-for-privacy@arrakis.es entity posted thusly:

If you can lay it out, why not just send it to your CNC machine?

Cut the layout with your CNC machine?

No, but thanks for the offer. If I wanted to do it that way, I'd just write a little PostScript thingy to lay it out.. I did this idea up for a friend who is trying to improve his boards. They are a folding design, with peg and card storage inside.
He makes them with walnut, birch, purpleheart and cherry, laminated. For the curved parts of the 'track', he cuts them with a bandsaw.
Larry
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Larry, you solicited "all ideas"; sorry for upsetting you. I have the CAD skills (for work), but no CNC.
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The Tom entity posted thusly:

Oh! Sorry!
For some reason I had you confused with Morris Dovey, who does have a CNC machine. No idea why I confused the two of you, but I did.
At any rate, you did not upset me, and I apologize for coming across that way. I did indeed solicit all ideas, and that isn't a bad one at all.
Larry
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Oleg Lego (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| The Tom entity posted thusly: | || Larry, you solicited "all ideas"; sorry for upsetting you. I have || the CAD skills (for work), but no CNC. | | Oh! Sorry! | | For some reason I had you confused with Morris Dovey, who does have | a CNC machine. No idea why I confused the two of you, but I did. | | At any rate, you did not upset me, and I apologize for coming across | that way. I did indeed solicit all ideas, and that isn't a bad one | at all.
It's actually the kind of job at which CNC machines excel.
I've been wondering why not make a hardboard template using a countersink bit - then use that template with a vix bit to drill the actual board? This approach should allow good registration for repeated use of the template without template wear or damage...
[ And no problem on confusing me. I'm confused most of the time :-p ]
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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The Morris Dovey entity posted thusly:

They sure do!

Interesting! A Google search led me to some examples of vix bits. I had not heard of them before.
Larry
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Oleg Lego (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| The Morris Dovey entity posted thusly: | || It's actually the kind of job at which CNC machines excel. | | They sure do! | || I've been wondering why not make a hardboard template using a || countersink bit - then use that template with a vix bit to drill || the actual board? This approach should allow good registration for || repeated use of the template without template wear or damage... | | Interesting! A Google search led me to some examples of vix bits. I | had not heard of them before.
They're readily available from many sources as "self-centering" bits. I got a set from Lee Valley, who offer sizes down to 5/64".
Drilling depth is limited with these bits; but once the holes have been "spotted" they should be easy to re-drill (use the depth stop on your drill press) to the depth you want.
If you make a lot of boards, it might be worthwhile to make your template from something more durable - like 1/8" aluminum, which should last a lifetime.
An afterthought:
I'm not a cribbage player and haven't seen a board for a long time. If the holes are too closely spaced for sufficiently deep countersinking in the template, it might be necessary to make two templates (each with half the holes) - in which case you'd want to provide some reliable way to register both templates to a pair of reference edges on the workpieces.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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