I would like to woodwork

Hi i would like to start woodworking and how should I go about it ? And what tools should I get . Jan
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Jan, "woodworking" is a very broad term. Perhaps you should narrow down your focus to a particular facet of the craft. I suggest you go to your local library and take ourt some books on the basics of woodworking, tools. From these you can obtain a basic understanding of hand tools, etc. ASnother consideration might be your local adult education provider, community college or technical school. Many offer courses for the begining woodworker. Therre are also do-it-yourself books in may bookstores.

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Some very good advice on the previous message. I started, as many, doing home maintenance and improvement and was starting to feel like I knew what I was doing. Then, several years ago I took a college level class in intro to cabinetmaking which was very enjoyable and an eye-opener. Not only did I learn a lot, but the shop was equipped with older, but very good equipment. I was introduced to the Unisaw, upper end but home-quality jointers, lathes and a host of equipment that ended up on my "some-day" list. They also taught the basics of sharpening and other skills. Our instructor also insisted we do a part of our projects using hand tools, even though the shop was pretty Norm-ized.
Don't just jump in and start buying from the Sunday sale ads. Every purchase of a piece of floor machinery should be preceeded by research, touching and talking with folks who know. There is a lot of expertise within this newsgroup (not talking about me either). Don't get trapped in the big-brandname trap either. There is very good equipment offered by a host of manufacturers and some do certain items better than others. Also, don't overlook the little things. In the end you could well have as much invested in hand tools, clamps, benches and accessories as the heavy equipment in your shop. You DON'T HAVE TO BUY IT ALL AT ONE TIME! In this regard it is better to choose carefully and buy stuff that will last, rather than buying a lot of "entry level" stuff. This also lets you get acquainted with a tool and a skill as you go. Don't overlook the used market. Classifieds, estate sales, garage sales and ebay offer a lot of good, used equipment.

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I have a daughter that occassionally hangs out in the "cave" as it is called - we found this - pick a simple project and do it - I know that there are some "kits" out there for some introductory type things. Test the water so to say before taking the deep plunge. Try to find what interests you most and see if there is something that could fulfill that vision.

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Wayne Cattanach wrote:

Excellent advice. Try to find kits that need a minimum of large tools to finish. You'll quickly learn what you like and what you don't like and that can guide you.
The other possibility is to take a class. Some junior colleges offer both regular and non-credit courses in woodworking that will teach you the basics in a semester or so, as well as letting you make some things.
The alternative is to check with the local woodworking stores like Woodcraft Supply (if they have a store near you). They frequently offer one-day courses in all kinds of projects at all kinds of price ranges.
I'd strongly suggest that you get some experience before you start making major investments in tools and equipment.
--RC
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On Fri, 8 Oct 2004 08:55:30 -0500, NorthernGal2 snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Northern Gal) wrote:

I'd suggest starting off by reading a few issues of Wood, Popular Woodworking, etc. I spent an afternoon at the library scanning past issues -- learning the nomeclature.
There are (at least) four forks in the roads of woodworking. Your tool selection would depend on the fork you choose.
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Start here: http://www.robson.org/woodfaq /
In particular: http://www.robson.org/woodfaq/woodfaq_1.html#Section_1.5
My take on it:
You need to decide what you want to build (jewelry boxes, cabinets, chairs, etc.) Also decide what kinds of materials you want to work with (starting with logs, rough boards, or surfaced boards, what kind of wood, etc.) Then you can inquire as to what tools might be appropriate.
To build some skills, start by cutting a 6" square from a board, as perfect as possible. Any difficulty you have with this will point you in the direction of your next tool purchase.
Next, start to learn some joinery (books, internet, or classes) to connect pieces in various ways to build a larger piece.
Then you need to study finishing. The effort of finishing a piece will often take as long as construction, so it's a significant skill.
Good luck!
-Mike
NorthernGal2 snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Northern Gal) wrote in message

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Mike Reed) writes:

[snip]
I'd say - learn this first. Buy a complete but unfinished thing from a store, and finish it. It may be pine, and glued together, but it's a start.
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NorthernGal2 snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Northern Gal) writes:

Sandpaper.
It seems silly, but a good job of sanding can transform a piece of junk into a pleasure to the eye.
You can buy unfinished wood, and if you do a poor job of finishing, it looks like something from the dollar store.
For instnce, if you stain end grain, it looks all muddy and ugly. But if it's well sanded, the end grain becomes quite attractive!
So this sould be one of the first things you learn to do. Buy some unfinished wood, like a small box, and sand it nicely, and then stain and finish it.
And when you get to hard woods, the skills will be more impressive - everyone will oh! and ah!
Welcome to the club, Jan. Hope to see one of your projects on a web page some day.
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NorthernGal2 snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net says...

You go to the book store and or library and obtain and study some books on the subject that go into depth answering those very questions.
Continuing or adult ed classes are good ways to start as are any local woodworking guilds or clubs.
When you can ask specific questions and have some hope of understanding the answers come back and ask them. We'd be happy to answer them.
--
MikeG
Heirloom Woods
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On Fri, 8 Oct 2004 08:55:30 -0500, NorthernGal2 snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Northern Gal) wrote:

Why ? What are you looking to get out of it ? Do you want a hobby, or furniture ?
Is there anything you've ever wanted to make ?
Anything you've ever seen and thought "I fancy a go at that" ?

Mainly by doing some. Make something. Make anything. Do it badly. Just _do_ something. It takes practice, so get some in.
What do you have already ? Some of the absolute basics are a workspace and a workbench. These also need storage space and lighting. The size of the space depends on what you're making - it can get pretty small if you have to, but something like furniture making really does call for a good stable bench.
Courses are great. You get instruction, a full set of tools to use, access to big complicated machines you really won't get hold of otherwise, and you do it in the company of other people.

None. Not yet anyway. The mistake _everyone_ makes is to buy too many tools and not enough timber. It's not about tool ownership ! That's called _collecting_ -- fine hobby, but it ain't woodworking.
Don't buy anything unless you really can't manage without it. Then don't buy it today. If you really still need it tomorrow, then maybe go and buy it.
Buy the best tools you can. Spend twice as much and buy half as many. Beyond a toolbox that you can carry with one hand, you never _need_ more tools to do woodworking. OK, so what you have influences _what_ you can do, but it doesn't stop you doing something and having fun doing it.
If you have absolutely no money, get a tent, an axe and a drawknife. With that little (and a woodland) you can make Windsor chairs!
You don't need any tool with a glossy advert. You don't need anything where the pricetag makes you whistle. You need almost nothing with a lead and a plug on it - of those you might use, the best of them are the immobile machines, not the shiny hand-held powertools in the shop.
Second hand tools are a great deal, once you know a little of what you want and how to get it going.
A good basis for a toolset will probably be posted somewhere. It's mainly obvious, but some things that beginners tend to omit are good tools for measuring and marking out, sharpening kit to look after what you have, and finishing kit.
Finishing is either the best part or a chore - people have their own views on this. One thing that's clear though is that it needs lots of cheap supplies and it's a real pain to run out. It can be worth buying a couple of nice big rolls of glasspaper, a range of assorted potions etc - doesn't cost much and it's a nice luxury to have all you need ready to hand.
Books can help too. There are a few real classics out there that everyone ought to have, a few that are excellent beginner's guides, and some that are essentials for the first time you use a particular technique or machine.
Most of all though, you need to get an understanding of timber. Find a good supplier, which means nearby, affordable and with a wide range. Good timber is cheaper than bad timber, but you have to search for it. The "retail" stuff is hugely over-priced, compared to buying it from somewhere with sawdust on the floor.
--
Smert' spamionam

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The best advice I can give you is to do what I did when my interest re-upped.
Go to your library for an afternoon and browse the many, many books they'll have there.
It will give you a sense of the scope of "woodworking" and allow you to decide on where you want to start. That will give you direction on the tools you'll want to start with.
Intarsia? Band and scroll saw.
Shelving and bookcases and tables? Table or radial arm saw and router.
etc, etc....
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I've always been of the opinion that everyone should have one year of shop courses when they go through high school and get a grounding in all the basics -- woodworking, electrical, plumbing and automotive.
All good practical skills that you need later in life, as opposed to calculus and geomtery (;=P)
Seriously, go to your local library and go through the stacks on "home handyman" and "hobbies" and anythign else that looks like a good category. The Time Life and Reader's digest books are good startign points for determining a small task that you can use as a stepping stone. A small beside table or locker (basic cabinet with a drawer and maybe a shelf) is a good small project.
Home Depot will have the lumber sizes you need and can cut the wood to size (probably a small additional charge) and make sure that you pack along the book so they have the dimensions needed.
A night-school program is also a good method of learning the basics of handling yourself in a shop SAFELY.
Best of luck!
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I did social studies homework during my high scholl shop class. My instructor did not instruct. The college class was a bit better. Working for a summer at different trades might be more valuable. A summer of framing, a summer of wrench turning with a master mechanic, a summer of cleaning clogged sewer pipes and septic systems. Ooh that summer work does not sound so good anymore.

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