I wonder what's kept under wraps?

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And I have a cold fusion reactor running in my basement. (:-)
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Robert Haar wrote:

Damn! And I thought I got away w/ the only working one of the prototypes...
Was working w/ EPRI when the furor was raised--a gravy train for some, albeit shortlived...
--
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wrote:

...and there is a hole clear through the earth under your garage to prove it.... boy were those Chinese on the other side surprised!
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I thought water was known as the universal solvent. JP
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Jay Pique wrote:

If you are willing to wait long enough.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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FoggyTown wrote:

...
Well, yeahbbut...
If there were a real market, it would make it out. While there may be an element of truth in the claims, it's unlikely this miracle product, whatever it might be, would be producible at a competitive price or not have some other problem or somebody would be doing it...there are an awful lot of bright folks out there.
--
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element of truth in the claims, it's unlikely this >miracle product, whatever it might be, would be producible at a >competitive price or not have some other problem or somebody >would be doing it...there are an awful lot of bright folks out >there.
I agree. While I am sure that huge manufacturing concerns have bought out their competitors and their product since time immemorial, I don't think good product stand much of a chance of being on the sidelines anymore. I think too many companies are too hungry and the chance to make a buck is too much to resist.
I think we believe what we want to, especially if we are feeling a little screwed about something. I remember in the 70s when we had the first gas crunch, it really changed the way people looked at gas. It became a precious commodity. Then somewhere along the late 70s, early 80s, all of us "in the know" KNEW that Bill Lear, the genius inventor had an 80+ mpg carburetor that was a simple bolt on to any car. In fact (the irony was lost on me at the time) the myth went that they tried it on Chevy trucks (wow.. I was driving a 3/4 ton Chevy at the time that got a solid 10 mpg) and it worked!
But then GM found out about it and bought it for almost 100 million dollars, because we found out that General Motors owned the oil companies. Yup, the job site brain trust was able to come up with a good theory in spite of a lack of facts.
I later saw Bill Lear's wife and his best friend on a documentary/ biography and they even talked about the 90 mpg carburetor. They had both heard of it, both got a chuckle out of it, and were amazed that it had such legs. They both said the same thing: Bill invented faster than he could come up with a money source to try out his ideas, and he was ALWAYS cash poor.
They were both in complete agreement that if Bill had come up with something that important, he would have sold it in a heartbeat. And since this guy was at his side for soemthing like 20 years, he felt like he would have known about a project that had actually gone to live testing.
But we sure "knew" that to be true for about 20 years. And there for a while it resurfaced every time we had a spike in gas price.
Robert
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wrote:

element of truth in the claims, it's unlikely this >miracle product, whatever it might be, would be producible at a >competitive price or not have some other problem or somebody >would be doing it...there are an awful lot of bright folks out >there.

One of the most efficient ways to move people in large quantities (over land, not water) is steel wheels on rails. Trams (streetcars) are the best example. Many cities in the US had very advanced trams systems (Chicago, for instance). Yet the deal schmoozed out between the man Firestone and one the US presidents (forgot which one) suddenly found the sale of tires and fuel more important and the whole transportation system went for crap just to sell rubber and. Big industry very often influences bad decisions propelled by their greed and executed by their campaign donations.in fact, entire wars. Peace is easier and cheaper to negotiate but doesn't sell hardware. So, if a palm-sized cold fusion power source ever became available, it wouldn't see the light of day.
r-----> aka as Zebco6-ultralight... unless I'm stumping for bass.
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Robatoy wrote:

But it is terribly inconvenient other than for the daily commute--it only runs when _IT_ runs, not necessarily when people _want_ to go. It is also a pita if the station isn't all that close to where one wants to be in the end...

That's simply wishful thinking and retrofit "history"...it all has to do with consumer choices and preferences. When Henry built an affordable automobile, there was no way in the world folks weren't going to choose the individualism of "having it their own way" over mass transportation except for the morning/evening commute, if that...
Neville Chamberlain also thought "negotiating peace" was possible...

That is also patently absurd (even if the concept were physically realizable, which it isn't)...
--
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...and man will never fly.
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Robatoy wrote:

There valid scientific reasons why even when it might have been thought to be impossible, it was theoretically so.
On the contrary, there are valid reasons (at least unless some of our basic understanding of nuclear physics are revolutionized which seem unlikely to that level) that "cold" fusion is not...
The point being however, if it does become so and is economically viable, there will be folks all over it. I was, as I said earlier, associated enough w/ power generation folks and EPRI at the time of the previous flap and there were whole divisions of folks looking into the potential already even as it was still being debated if it were real (which, of course, it turned out it wasn't).
--
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Robatoy wrote:

Palm sized fusion maybe. But it's not going to be "cold fusion". If you believe in "cold fusion" might I interest you in this nice ski resort outside Des Moines . . .
--
--
--John
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Lukewarm fusion maybe?
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He wasn't exactly negotiating from a position of strength, now was he?
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Robatoy wrote:

So how was that supposed to be "easy" as compared to what his government subsequently underwent?
--


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I wasn't exactly suggesting to run a tram track into everybody's driveway, now was I? Trams vs busses on main arteries. Railroad freight vs trucks on long distances. Of course you need a 'spoke' system with the flexibility of tired vehicles. Smart people in Toronto, for instance, take the rails to work and leave the cars at home when they can. A small hop on a bus to get to the end of your street makes sense in a system like that. But, of course, I am stating the obvious.
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Robatoy wrote:

But where's the "government conspiracy" w/ Firestone? It's all choice--many places can't persuade folks to ride mass transport even if it is heavily subsidized.
--


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Robatoy wrote:

How well do trams fit into rush hour traffic? How easy is it to change the route? And how much does it cost to run trams including maintaining the infrastructure vs running buses? Don't assume that "more efficient" in terms of rolling friction means "cheaper to run".
People in NYC also take the rails to work. So what? But NYC has no trams, you can take the subway to walking distance of just about anywhere in the city. And in Toronto they are now planning to extend the system to cover many suburbs that currently have no service.
--
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--John
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Well, that's one for the old zebco...
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:)
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