I was finally horrified by one of norm's finishes

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BTW, I flew through ATL a few times this week, and I think I saw some of the McMansions you were describing a few weeks back.
These neighborhoods are located on the end of the airport where one flies over the Ford plant and Atlanta Exposition Center. They are HUGE, extremely close together new homes, located right in the approach and departure path of the busiest airport in the USA. <G>
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On 3/4/2006 1:14 PM Ba r r y mumbled something about the following:

That's a few of the McMansions. There are also quite a few on the north side as well. I was going to our Buckhead office the other day (North Atlanta) and passed by some new condos, 3 bedroom, 3 floors, about 1500 sq ft, $500,000 each. Not for me, I'll take my 1400 sq ft doublewide and 5 acres of land that I paid about $85,000 for.
--
Odinn
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I'm sure the residents are petitioning the city to get rid of the airport as we speak. Happens around here all the time. People build their houses off the end of a runway then claim the noise is ruining their life. Same with the local dragstrip. Heard a top fueler lately? Why would any sane person by a house in that area?
wrote: They are

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I think they'd have some difficulty closing ATL, but I hear those stories all the time from other general aviation guys about smaller fields all over the US. Heck, Mayor Daley turned Miegs field in Chicago into a park in the middle of the night! The airport was built in 1936, and I built my house in 2005, so CLOSE the airport! <G>
One of my local GA fields (KMMK) spans two towns, with the southern town refusing to left them build buildings in the hopes that they'll go away. The town that hosts the northen end has just offered to build new hangars and offices, and wisely placed their sewage plant and dump next door. The northern end keeps growing, along with the tax revenue from the buildings, while the southern end is just grass, some lights, and a fence.
FWIW, I live 30 minutes from a former dragstrip that is now the Consumer Reports test track. It's on a 300 acre property, which the dragstrip owner sold in bankruptcy. CR added an off-road course and a skid pad. The residents are thrilled, as CR only runs street legal, muffled cars, so there isn't much noise.
Barry
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On Sat, 04 Mar 2006 22:03:10 GMT, Ba r r y

In all fairness, though, CGX (Meigs) wasn't about noise; Da Mayor just wanted the land for some more lucrative use. It wasn't a particularly dangerous airport so far as threats of crashes in the neighborhoods go, as the approaches were all over water, both north and south.
There was never going to be an instrument approach to it, what with the Loop buildings so close by. Without an instrument approach and only about 3500' of runway (if I recall) it was unlikely to ever attract commercial flights (the straw man of all airport expansion NIMBY arguments)--even the state airplanes, when they filed into CGX had to shoot the approach to MDW (Midway), cancel IFR, and then go to CGX VFR (if they could).
One of my most dramatic memories, other than flying in and out of there myself, was when United Airlines donated an obsolete Boeing 727 to the Museum of Science and Industry, and they flew it into CGX to later be barged down to the museum. They pretty well stripped the airplane, loaded minimum fuel, flew the approach completely dirty (as they usually do anyway), but at a seriously low speed, and used up just about all the runway to get it stopped. It wasn't leaving.
Bulldozing that was a shame. Probably the single most recognizable airport in the world, particularly because of Flight Simulator. Chicago could/should have milked that for all the publicity it was worth, rather than depend on a few measly millions for rich people's yacht berths.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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wrote:

Right on...
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Me too but Poplar is often substituted for Walnut and much cheaper especially if you are going to douse it with paint.
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Yea, he had the right wood, just picked the wrong project for it. Natural finish would have been really cool. --dave

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"brianlanning" wrote in message

Some folks just shouldn't be allowed to apply finishes ... I know because, being color blind, I feel that way about my own finishing attempts.
I am thinking that Norm mostly needs to stick to paint on curly poplar and quarter sawn mdf. If I was that rich and famous, damn if I wouldn't hire someone to do it right.
--
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I watched an episode where 'Nahm' got very expensive slow growth sinker log wood with the most beautifull grain. Before making the project, he was quite proud to comment on the value and work required to retrieve these logs and have them sawn and dried. Then he made the project piece and painted it with what looked like green fence paint.
Has anyone else noticed that when he uses a 'little' glue, there seems to be an awfull lot of sqeeze out. I think he gets glue by the drum.
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snipped-for-privacy@mts.net wrote:

He does bill himself as a "master carpenter", not a "master cabinetmaker", perhaps your expectations are a bit too high.
Pete C.
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I have learned not to have expectations.
I'm not knocking his work, in fact it's actually quite good - up to the finishing part, sometimes. I would lay paint on MDF/plywood/particle board and maybe on a fence board, but not on expensive woods particularly the ones that are hard to come by.
Pete
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After how many years of making furniture does one qualify to call himself a furniture maker (not a master, just a good ol' furniture maker)?
Norm's been at it for, what, coming up on 18 years now? Likely his NYW furniture building gig is sitting pert near 1/2 of his adult wage earning life. Me thinks he's had enough time and experience at furniture making to drop that tired old overplayed excuse.
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Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 09:19:52 -0800, Fly-by-Night CC

C'mon. He makes 13 projects a year, at two days per project. That's 26 days. I don't know where you work, but most people have to put in at least 250 days to total a year's experience. At 18 years of NYW production, he doesn't even have two years of actual experience in hand yet.
I imagine his "This Old House" gig (which has about double or more the number of episodes per year) takes much more of his time than the NYW gig, not to mention his "Inside This Old House" appearances, personal appearances, etc., I don't think he has much time outside NYW production to work on his furniture making.
I think he does pretty good for only having two years experience.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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LRod wrote:

My understanding is that he usually makes each project three times -- once to figure out how, a second time to make the prototype for the show, and then the third, flimed for the show. So that is six days per episode assuming that the first two are done as fast as the last, which they probably are not. Then there is time spent getting materials and hunting for and measuring originals. So I'd guess that amounts to at least 100 workdays per year for NYWS.

I doubt that that This old house stuff takes as much of his time per hour of showtime as does NYWS. Often he just explains what other people are doing.

I think he has plenty of skill. How he choses to do things may simply reflect a lot on his personal preferences.
--

FF
cuundio


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<<I think he has plenty of skill. How he choses to do things may simply reflect a lot on his personal preferences.>>
And many of those choices are made for him. Keep in mind that while Norm is the most visible person involved with the New Yankee Workshop, he is not the boss. Russ Morash is. Most of the furniture Norm builds ends up in one of Morash's residences, one of which I believe is attached to the Workshop itself. Another is on Cape Cod or Martha's Vineyard or some other MA vacation spot. Those are Morash's tools (no doubt provided free by the manufacturers), although apparently Norm has free reign to do his own projects in the NYW because that shop is better equipped than his own. And it is Morash who decides what Norm is going to build and what color it gets stained. I can't tell you if that decision is based upon his personal taste or the fact that Minwax puts up some of the dough for the show or, as I suspect, a bit of both.
Lee
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Pete C. wrote:

ISTR that it was RUssel Morash who came up with the title 'Master Carpenter', has Nahrm ever referred to himself as such?
If he did, I'll bet it was in jest.
--

FF


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brianlanning wrote:

Why did it take this long to be horrified, Brian? :) :)
dave
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wrote:

When I saw that episode I immediately checked the wreck for the thread complaining about it. I'm not shocked at what he did, but I am shocked it took this long for one to show up :) "dark walnut stain" is too kind, that may as well have been black paint. Maybe they cut out the part where he goes "Oh crap, I should have tested on a piece of scrap."
"It seems to be evening out the color" Uhhh... yep, it's even Norm.
I thought maybe once he brought it out in the sun like he always does at the end it wouldn't look as dark, but darned if I could see any grain even then.
But he did use some hand tools making it, that counts for something. But he also used the "industrial pocket hole machine" so that negates that.
-Leuf
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wrote:

That's because the episode just aired last Saturday (25 Feb; just five days ago) on the national PBS feed and some local PBS outlets. Likely there are very few wreckers that have even seen it yet.
I'm a week behind the national feed in my market (Orlando area) and I haven't seen it yet, either. By the end of whine season (probably two of them) I'll be four to five weeks behind.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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