I've Rediscovered WD-40

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Haven't posted for awhile, but I still read the group at least once a week.
Ya know how when you were but a babe, maybe 20, maybe a teenager, and you discovered the wonders of WD-40? When you sprayed it here and there, it made everything work easier, quieter? I was like that. Then I discovered Usenet and this group in particular. I read how the magical fluid in the blue can was not a lubricant. That anything it did would not last. That it could cause more problems then it solved. So, I believed it all and began using other recommended sprays and lubricants. And that is the way it has been for me for years. Oh, I still used WD-40 for certain things, mostly when one of my cast iron tools would get some surface rust on it. I would spray it on, let it set a bit and then scrub with a Scotch pad. That always worked and worked well. Other than that, haven't really used it for years.
A while back, I had a sticking file cabinet lock at work. It just kept getting harder and harder to turn the key each day, but I put up with it. One day I thought I was going to break the key off. All we had in the office was a can of WD-40. From what I had learned, that was exactly the wrong thing to use. I needed some graphite! But, we didn't have any. I was frustrated and really didn't care. I took the blue can, aimed the tube into the lock and sprayed, just a little. I know how this stuff runs. I slipped in my key and voila! It turned like buttah. That was about 2 years ago. The lock still works great.
The other day, one of our screen door locks just wouldn't turn. It's a deadbolt on a little used door. It has a knob on the inside to turn it but it just wouldn't budge. I thought, "this isn't good, what if there's a fire?" There was a slight gap when I pushed on the door, just enough to get that little spray tube into, but it wasn't going to reach any part of the workings of the lock. I tried to take the lock apart, removing the screws and as much of the cylinder as I could, but that door wasn't going to open. I reassembled everything in frustration. Then I sprayed just a little WD-40 on the only part I could reach, the bolt itself through the crack in the door. I turned the knob again, and again, voila! It turned like buttah. I immediately went around to the other two screen doors and did the same and while I was there, I sprayed what I could reach and the key hole on all the locks. Everything has quieted down and turns easily. That was a couple weeks ago and I'm still amazed at how easily and quietly everything is working.
Now, back at work. We have a 60 cup coffee pot that plugs into a timer. I'm the coffee guy, mostly for self-preservation. At the end of the day, I unplug the cord from the timer so I can get enough room to wash up the pot for the next day. It has become increasingly difficult to remove the plug from the timer. I had to pull realllly hard to get it out. This has been going on for about three years. Today, I took a paper towel and sprayed a little WD-40 on it and wiped the blades of the plug. Slipped it in the outlet of the timer and, well, you get the idea. Like buttah.......
Recently purchased a couple Honda scooters, used. The lock to lift up the seat for the helmet holder was hard to turn on both of them. Pssst, psst, they work like new. The cargo door locks on my motorhome were difficult to turn. A little in the key hole and a little on the inside latch, good to go!
So, don't believe everything you hear or read. Yes, there are places where some other lubricant is more appropriate, but WD-40 has earned a spot right up front on my lubricant shelf, once again. Try it, you might like it, just like you used to.
--

Best Regards,

Phil Anderson
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Troll post attempting to recover failing sales comes up every few months.
WD-40 wrecks more than it fixes!
Spam the garbage somewhere else!
--------------- "Phil Anderson" wrote in message
Haven't posted for awhile, but I still read the group at least once a week.
Ya know how when you were but a babe, maybe 20, maybe a teenager, and you discovered the wonders of WD-40? When you sprayed it here and there, it made everything work easier, quieter? I was like that. Then I discovered Usenet and this group in particular. I read how the magical fluid in the blue can was not a lubricant. That anything it did would not last. That it could cause more problems then it solved. So, I believed it all and began using other recommended sprays and lubricants. And that is the way it has been for me for years. Oh, I still used WD-40 for certain things, mostly when one of my cast iron tools would get some surface rust on it. I would spray it on, let it set a bit and then scrub with a Scotch pad. That always worked and worked well. Other than that, haven't really used it for years.
A while back, I had a sticking file cabinet lock at work. It just kept getting harder and harder to turn the key each day, but I put up with it. One day I thought I was going to break the key off. All we had in the office was a can of WD-40. From what I had learned, that was exactly the wrong thing to use. I needed some graphite! But, we didn't have any. I was frustrated and really didn't care. I took the blue can, aimed the tube into the lock and sprayed, just a little. I know how this stuff runs. I slipped in my key and voila! It turned like buttah. That was about 2 years ago. The lock still works great.
The other day, one of our screen door locks just wouldn't turn. It's a deadbolt on a little used door. It has a knob on the inside to turn it but it just wouldn't budge. I thought, "this isn't good, what if there's a fire?" There was a slight gap when I pushed on the door, just enough to get that little spray tube into, but it wasn't going to reach any part of the workings of the lock. I tried to take the lock apart, removing the screws and as much of the cylinder as I could, but that door wasn't going to open. I reassembled everything in frustration. Then I sprayed just a little WD-40 on the only part I could reach, the bolt itself through the crack in the door. I turned the knob again, and again, voila! It turned like buttah. I immediately went around to the other two screen doors and did the same and while I was there, I sprayed what I could reach and the key hole on all the locks. Everything has quieted down and turns easily. That was a couple weeks ago and I'm still amazed at how easily and quietly everything is working.
Now, back at work. We have a 60 cup coffee pot that plugs into a timer. I'm the coffee guy, mostly for self-preservation. At the end of the day, I unplug the cord from the timer so I can get enough room to wash up the pot for the next day. It has become increasingly difficult to remove the plug from the timer. I had to pull realllly hard to get it out. This has been going on for about three years. Today, I took a paper towel and sprayed a little WD-40 on it and wiped the blades of the plug. Slipped it in the outlet of the timer and, well, you get the idea. Like buttah.......
Recently purchased a couple Honda scooters, used. The lock to lift up the seat for the helmet holder was hard to turn on both of them. Pssst, psst, they work like new. The cargo door locks on my motorhome were difficult to turn. A little in the key hole and a little on the inside latch, good to go!
So, don't believe everything you hear or read. Yes, there are places where some other lubricant is more appropriate, but WD-40 has earned a spot right up front on my lubricant shelf, once again. Try it, you might like it, just like you used to.
--

Best Regards,

Phil Anderson
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m II wrote:

Yes, this piece is an obvious ad for WE-40.
That being said, its a rather cute piece, which makes me wonder about those who would get upset over it.
On a related topic. My brother's tagline is "The only things you need in this world are duct tape and WD-40." He's not too far off. Back about 23 years ago, when we started building our place here in the country, it got to be a joke and a sense of amazement between my wife and I over all the uses we were finding for WD-40. Leon is right, it works well for removing bugs from the car. In addition, it is great at taking paint off your hands and the list goes on.
Of course, I live in the South with its humidity. But even back in S. Central Illinois where I was raised, we found we really couldn't get along without it. Oh, other things do a better job, in certain areas (like PB Blaster for rusted bolts) but it really just kind of the "Swiss Army Knife" in a can thing.
Deb

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On 7/15/2011 8:24 AM, Dr. Deb wrote:

Have more respect for your elders!
You guys just haven't been around here long enough. Phil Anderson (if indeed it is the same Phil, and it sure sounds like it) was a regular here at least ten or more years ago, actually maybe like fifteen years ago?.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
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I don't know, but I looked up his posting pattern and this guy definitely isn't a spammer. He may have lifted a cute anecdote or its parts for the story (or not), but 7 posts in a 10 month period doesn't seem like much of a spam effort.
Anyway, I always keep WD40 around. I don't use it on door locks, machines, and thinking about it, rarely as a lubricant. But it is dandy as its original intent as "Water Displacment formula 40" indicates.
I swab it on my pocket knife blade after using it as cleaner (blade only). I spray sheetmetal flashings to keep zinc oxide from appearing until they are used; if I have a box of nails in the back of the truck and rain is approaching, I spray the top and sides of the box to keep rain and moisture out. After sharpening my beater chisels that get used for everything (sadly....) I wipe them off with WD40 before putting them in the toolbox. My big peanut butter jar of odd screws and fasteners left from various installations gets a spritz to keep the contents from oxidizing while riding in the truck.
It works great on the ends of brass hoses to ease connects and disconnects. Ditto the hose bibb. Works great on the connections and tips for my power washer to keep them easy to connect and disconnect.
Lots of stuff to do with old faithful, you just need to remember lubrication isn't its forte. Robert
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I don't know, but I looked up his posting pattern and this guy definitely isn't a spammer. He may have lifted a cute anecdote or its parts for the story (or not), but 7 posts in a 10 month period doesn't seem like much of a spam effort.
Anyway, I always keep WD40 around. I don't use it on door locks, machines, and thinking about it, rarely as a lubricant. But it is dandy as its original intent as "Water Displacment formula 40" indicates.
I swab it on my pocket knife blade after using it as cleaner (blade only). I spray sheetmetal flashings to keep zinc oxide from appearing until they are used; if I have a box of nails in the back of the truck and rain is approaching, I spray the top and sides of the box to keep rain and moisture out. After sharpening my beater chisels that get used for everything (sadly....) I wipe them off with WD40 before putting them in the toolbox. My big peanut butter jar of odd screws and fasteners left from various installations gets a spritz to keep the contents from oxidizing while riding in the truck.
It works great on the ends of brass hoses to ease connects and disconnects. Ditto the hose bibb. Works great on the connections and tips for my power washer to keep them easy to connect and disconnect.
Lots of stuff to do with old faithful, you just need to remember lubrication isn't its forte. ============================================= It was middling even as a water displacer.
I forgot the name of its main competitor a while back -- mighta been liquid wrench -- but I recall a water leak on my crappy 1/8" HR steel welding table. Part of it had remnants of WD, the other liquid wrench, and guess which part had all the rust spots and which had none?? Yup.....
The only redemption WD might have is the dissolved solids it supposedly has, left behind when it dries, but frankly, there's not too much evidence of them either.
WD but another half-assed product with a top notch marketing/distribution team, so that in the Big Box World, at least, it's all you see. Few people realize that Starbucks is over-priced middling coffee. Yet there are more Starbucks than there are liquor stores.
WD's real utility is as an overpriced tapping fluid for aluminum, largely because of its kerosene base.
--
EA

Robert



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Existential Angst wrote the following:

I too remember some other product. All I remember was that it had a C and perhaps a D in its name.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

lubricant.
LPS 1 as well. LPS2 is a heavier product - better as a lub, not quite as good as a water displacer - but stays on longer than LPS1.
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I don't know, but I looked up his posting pattern and this guy definitely isn't a spammer. He may have lifted a cute anecdote or its parts for the story (or not), but 7 posts in a 10 month period doesn't seem like much of a spam effort.
Anyway, I always keep WD40 around. I don't use it on door locks, machines, and thinking about it, rarely as a lubricant. But it is dandy as its original intent as "Water Displacment formula 40" indicates.
I swab it on my pocket knife blade after using it as cleaner (blade only). I spray sheetmetal flashings to keep zinc oxide from appearing until they are used; if I have a box of nails in the back of the truck and rain is approaching, I spray the top and sides of the box to keep rain and moisture out. After sharpening my beater chisels that get used for everything (sadly....) I wipe them off with WD40 before putting them in the toolbox. My big peanut butter jar of odd screws and fasteners left from various installations gets a spritz to keep the contents from oxidizing while riding in the truck.
It works great on the ends of brass hoses to ease connects and disconnects. Ditto the hose bibb. Works great on the connections and tips for my power washer to keep them easy to connect and disconnect.
Lots of stuff to do with old faithful, you just need to remember lubrication isn't its forte.
Robert
All good ideas, Robert. I especially like the hose bibb fittings and the pressure washer. I'll get right on it!
Phil
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On 7/15/2011 7:12 PM, Phil Anderson wrote:

The large rubber bushings/gaskets on my 1 1/2" PVC couplings and connections on my pool piping used to be a bitch to tighten and needed at least channel locks to get tight. Once I spray them with WD40 they hand tighten with ease, and no leaks. Works good on regular rubber hose washers as well. Seems to keep them in good shape with no age cracks or dry rotting.
--
Jack
You Can't Fix Stupid, but You Can Vote it Out!
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Jack Stein wrote the following:

Two indispensable lubricants in my house are WD-40 and Vasoline. I use plain vasoline on my pool fittings and valves instead of the very expensive silicone lubricant that comes in the tiny tubes at pool stores.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote the following:

Update: The other day I was going through the crap stored in my garage to see what I could throw awayand came across my old softball glove. It was an old Ted Williams model from Sears, and last used about 15 years ago when I played in soft pitch beer leagues and could still run between bases at full gallop. It looked like hell and seemed more destined for the trash than anything else. It had mold in places and the lacing straps were kinda stiff and it didn't fold too easily when I placed it on my hand. Just for kicks and with nothing to lose, I sprayed it all over with WD-40 and rubbed it all in, then wiped it with dry rags. The mold was gone and the laces were soft again. I put it on and it seemed to be as good as new. It's been a couple of days since and it doesn't even have an oily smell, although it does have a slightly darker color.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 7/19/2011 4:44 PM, willshak wrote:

as a lotion for my old carcass!
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On Tue, 19 Jul 2011 17:01:08 -0700, Doug Winterburn

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On 7/19/2011 5:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Too late :-(
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It has been some years now, but it was mentioned that a group of people in a 'old age home' was using WD-40 to lube their knees and ankles.
It seemed to work for them - but they had to stop since that was more dangerous with he absorption of chemicals.
The doctor never could help them as much as it did.
Martin
On 7/19/2011 7:35 PM, Doug Winterburn wrote:

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"Martin Eastburn" wrote in message

Did it actually help, or did they feel better because they expected to feel better after spraying their joints?
http://arthritis.about.com/od/alternativetreatments/f/wd40.htm
WD-40 For Arthritis: What Is The Premise?
The premise seems simple enough, you spray or rub on a dose of WD-40 to free up stiff, painful arthritic joints just like they oiled up the Tin Man in the classic movie "The Wizard of Oz".
However, according to John C. Wolf, D.O., Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Family Medicine News (1998 archives), "In the case of WD-40, a great myth developed about its benefits in treating arthritis. It is easy to follow the flawed logic: WD-40 works wonders on stiff door locks, squeaky hinges, and rusted bolts. Therefore, it should make my stiff, sore, squeaking arthritic joints work better. Unfortunately, like all myths, this one isn't true."
WD-40 For Arthritis: Potential For Harm
A look at the WD-40 MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) shows that the product contains petroleum distillates. Skin contact may cause drying of skin and/or irritation. According to the WD-40 MSDS, it is advised to wash with soap and water if you have contact with your skin.
Greater risks can come from prolonged exposure. According to the article, WD-40 for Arthritis? by Katherine Poehlmann, Ph.D., "To date, no credible scientific studies have shown any benefit from the use of WD-40 for arthritis. In fact, there may be cumulative harmful effects."
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There are some here that intentionally and knowingly ingest mineral oil. A little more petroleum product in your liver, would be no big deal
----------------
"DGDevin" wrote in message
Did it actually help, or did they feel better because they expected to feel better after spraying their joints?
http://arthritis.about.com/od/alternativetreatments/f/wd40.htm
WD-40 For Arthritis: What Is The Premise?
The premise seems simple enough, you spray or rub on a dose of WD-40 to free up stiff, painful arthritic joints just like they oiled up the Tin Man in the classic movie "The Wizard of Oz".
However, according to John C. Wolf, D.O., Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Family Medicine News (1998 archives), "In the case of WD-40, a great myth developed about its benefits in treating arthritis. It is easy to follow the flawed logic: WD-40 works wonders on stiff door locks, squeaky hinges, and rusted bolts. Therefore, it should make my stiff, sore, squeaking arthritic joints work better. Unfortunately, like all myths, this one isn't true."
WD-40 For Arthritis: Potential For Harm
A look at the WD-40 MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) shows that the product contains petroleum distillates. Skin contact may cause drying of skin and/or irritation. According to the WD-40 MSDS, it is advised to wash with soap and water if you have contact with your skin.
Greater risks can come from prolonged exposure. According to the article, WD-40 for Arthritis? by Katherine Poehlmann, Ph.D., "To date, no credible scientific studies have shown any benefit from the use of WD-40 for arthritis. In fact, there may be cumulative harmful effects."
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Josepi wrote the following:

When I was a kid in the early 1940s, I was given a spoonful of Mineral Oil or Castor Oil as a laxative. Mineral Oil wasn't so bad, but Castor Oil was horrible.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Despite all the warnings people still use it and with a USP label on it people don't read that either.
-------------
"willshak" wrote in message
When I was a kid in the early 1940s, I was given a spoonful of Mineral Oil or Castor Oil as a laxative. Mineral Oil wasn't so bad, but Castor Oil was horrible.
---------------- Josepi wrote the following: There are some here that intentionally and knowingly ingest mineral oil. A little more petroleum product in your liver, would be no big deal
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