I've had a discussion with friends

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Try this one:
Buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo
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No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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But English isn't terribly hard to learn, compared to other languages; Mandarin or Cantonese for example.
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| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
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wrote:

Can't be that hard, if you go over to China even little kids can speak it.
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And why do we park in a driveway and drive on a parkway?
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On Fri, 27 Oct 2006 00:46:53 GMT, "The3rd Earl Of Derby"

Well, gee, your lordship-
I was talking with some friends, and they agreed that a "boot" was something you put on your foot, and not a part of an automobile.
Big thumbs down on that one. Doesn't jive with American English.
Must have been a wanker that came up with that one, but since we're forgiving folks, I don't think we need to start shooting Redcoats. :)
Gotta pull that [ insert 'Proper' British term for "stick" here ] out of your bum, buddy. We're all aware that there are different terms in common usage on opposite sides of the Atlantic, but there's no call to be a pompous ass about it.
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Prometheus wrote:

I agree,I would also like to point out *Trunk* is part of the anatomy of an african/indian animal and not the car.

All's I'm doing is pointing out that the word *Dado* is a stupid word to describe a rebate,Rabett,recess,trench. I wasnt the one that started ripping the English/US language apart.
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You don't get it yet -- of *course* dado is a stupid word to describe a rabbet. Because it's the *wrong* word. A dado is not a rabbet. They're two different things.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Ah, but a 'trunk' is what you stow things in, say, on a trans-Atlantic voyage.
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

...
Well, I don't suppose many American English words "sound right" to speakers of British English... :( Doesn't mean they're not the correct words on either side, though.
My American Oxford dictionary indicates the use of "dado" for a ploughed groove in woodworking goes back at least to mid-17th century, so it certainly isn't particularly recent in the colonies. I know of no reference that follows the derivation of the term's history of usage in the US, but it certainly is well-known and the accepted term here. That it may not be somewhere else isn't necessarily surprising, at least to me.
So, what do you folks call this tool?
http://www.forrestblades.com/dado.htm
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A plow/plough is NOT a dado, for the sake of proper terminology, any more than it is a rabbet/rebate.
He probably wouldn't call it anything, because the nanny suprastate called the EEC has decided it's too dangerous for him.
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George wrote:

You could be right as that sort of blade will be only used in a commercial wood shop?
Never seen such a beast over here?
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

No, they're quite common even for the casual weekender, I'd say...

Guess you wouldn't need a name for it then, eh? :)
I did do a quick google and found one uk-based woodworking discussion group where it was being discussed so assumed it was at least available, even if not widely used for whatever reason. I'd heard that there were restrictions on arbor length on at least some saws that limit their use, but don't know the precise details. I personally don't see them as fundamentally any more dangerous than a single blade and, in fact, use a 10" rather than 8" simply as it makes adjust of the arbor more convenient in switchover, not for any additional capacity although it does aid on occasion when use the two outer blades alone w/ a spacer between for simulataneous cutting of tenon cheeks.
I don't see the reason to be in such an apparent snit over the general issue, however, that a different terminology exists and that there's any reason (other than the obvious one of familiarity) to claim one is any way preferable to another so I'm done--I really knew I should have continued to ignore the whole discussion. Unless, of course, the whole point is simply to "stir the pot", so to speak.
I understand the initial question and confusion, just fail to see any merit in the followup once it was explained. In earlier response tried to defuse the issue by pointing out it isn't anything new at all in the US so can't claim "johnny-come-lately" or other such laxity in usage. That didn't seem to work, either. :(
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dpb wrote:

Well thats brought it to light then,a 17thC word yelled by a woodcutter.
A young guy working, chiseling a rebate in a piece of wood who accidently cuts his finger off and yells...Dado(father)I've cut me finger off.
Pmsl
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I agree that there are people in this world that need a good killing. At the least a fair trial before we hang 'em.
I watched a show on US TV about boat repair/mantenance. John Graviscus was describing a 'dah doh' . These are the moments when you need to get the gun. If you mis use a word at least pronounce it correctly as 'day doh'
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

Found here http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/handtools.pl?noframes ;read567 and in whole
Dave asked:
"I'm curious how a cross grain groove in wood came to be known as a dado? Any theories?"
I have wondered if the "sunken" aspect of the architectural dado may not be related to the cross-grain dado, but find this unsatisfactory because it doesn't address the cross-grain aspect.
So, your question prompted me to delve into this a bit last evening. In the process, I ran across an entry for "Dado" in Peter Nicholson's _Encyclopedia of Architecture_ (circa 1850's) which *may* provide a speculative basis for a theory about this etymology. Following is the entry at length. This is easier than attempting to summarize or paraphrase, and provides some traditional woodworking content even if it proves entirely irrelevant to the question at hand. :-)
"DADO (an Italian word, signifying a die), a term for the die or plain face of a pedestal; that part of a room comprehended between the base and surbase. The dado employed in the interiors of buildings, is a continuous pedestal, with a plinth and base moulding, and a cornice or dado moulding surmounting the die. This continuous pedestal with its moulding is sometimes only made of stucco or plaster; but in well-finished rooms is constructed of wood, and is usually about the height of the back of a chair. Its present purpose, when employed, is to protect the stucco-work or paper of the walls, but originally it was used as an architectural decoration to the room.
"The dado is made of deal boards, glued edge to edge, the heading joints ploughed and tongued together, and the back keyed; the stuff generally employed for this purpose is whole deal; the keys are always made to taper in their breadth, and may be about three inches broad in the middle; they are let into the back of the dado by a transverse groove, which is either wider at the bottom than at the surface, or it is first made of a square section, which is again grooved on each side next to the bottom. Though the keys should shrink, those of this last form will always keep their inner surface close to the bottom of the grooves.
"Some workmen prefer the broad end of the key to be placed downwards; the lower end should rest firmly, either upon the ground or floor, and the dado should be left at liberty to slide downwards upon the keys. Others, again, prefer the wide end of the key to be placed upwards, and the dado to be fixed by this; the key, as it shrinks, will fall down from its own weight."
What strikes me is that the "transverse groove" across the back of the dado boards may well have been established with "dado" or double nickered "jack rabbet" planes. This groove could then have been modified to form a tapered sliding dovetail joint or "T-slot" (as I interpret the text). Possibly, the transverse grooves and the planes which produced them, came to have the term "dado" attached to them by association through their usage on the dado boards?
Needless to say, this is a conjectural theory, and I put it forth purely for its heuristic value.
Don McConnell Eureka Springs, AR
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

Found here http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/handtools.pl?noframes ;read567 and in whole
Dave asked:
"I'm curious how a cross grain groove in wood came to be known as a dado? Any theories?"
I have wondered if the "sunken" aspect of the architectural dado may not be related to the cross-grain dado, but find this unsatisfactory because it doesn't address the cross-grain aspect.
So, your question prompted me to delve into this a bit last evening. In the process, I ran across an entry for "Dado" in Peter Nicholson's _Encyclopedia of Architecture_ (circa 1850's) which *may* provide a speculative basis for a theory about this etymology. Following is the entry at length. This is easier than attempting to summarize or paraphrase, and provides some traditional woodworking content even if it proves entirely irrelevant to the question at hand. :-)
"DADO (an Italian word, signifying a die), a term for the die or plain face of a pedestal; that part of a room comprehended between the base and surbase. The dado employed in the interiors of buildings, is a continuous pedestal, with a plinth and base moulding, and a cornice or dado moulding surmounting the die. This continuous pedestal with its moulding is sometimes only made of stucco or plaster; but in well-finished rooms is constructed of wood, and is usually about the height of the back of a chair. Its present purpose, when employed, is to protect the stucco-work or paper of the walls, but originally it was used as an architectural decoration to the room.
"The dado is made of deal boards, glued edge to edge, the heading joints ploughed and tongued together, and the back keyed; the stuff generally employed for this purpose is whole deal; the keys are always made to taper in their breadth, and may be about three inches broad in the middle; they are let into the back of the dado by a transverse groove, which is either wider at the bottom than at the surface, or it is first made of a square section, which is again grooved on each side next to the bottom. Though the keys should shrink, those of this last form will always keep their inner surface close to the bottom of the grooves.
"Some workmen prefer the broad end of the key to be placed downwards; the lower end should rest firmly, either upon the ground or floor, and the dado should be left at liberty to slide downwards upon the keys. Others, again, prefer the wide end of the key to be placed upwards, and the dado to be fixed by this; the key, as it shrinks, will fall down from its own weight."
What strikes me is that the "transverse groove" across the back of the dado boards may well have been established with "dado" or double nickered "jack rabbet" planes. This groove could then have been modified to form a tapered sliding dovetail joint or "T-slot" (as I interpret the text). Possibly, the transverse grooves and the planes which produced them, came to have the term "dado" attached to them by association through their usage on the dado boards?
Needless to say, this is a conjectural theory, and I put it forth purely for its heuristic value.
Don McConnell Eureka Springs, AR
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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

Found here http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/handtools.pl?noframes ;read567 and in whole
Dave asked:
"I'm curious how a cross grain groove in wood came to be known as a dado? Any theories?"
I have wondered if the "sunken" aspect of the architectural dado may not be related to the cross-grain dado, but find this unsatisfactory because it doesn't address the cross-grain aspect.
So, your question prompted me to delve into this a bit last evening. In the process, I ran across an entry for "Dado" in Peter Nicholson's _Encyclopedia of Architecture_ (circa 1850's) which *may* provide a speculative basis for a theory about this etymology. Following is the entry at length. This is easier than attempting to summarize or paraphrase, and provides some traditional woodworking content even if it proves entirely irrelevant to the question at hand. :-)
"DADO (an Italian word, signifying a die), a term for the die or plain face of a pedestal; that part of a room comprehended between the base and surbase. The dado employed in the interiors of buildings, is a continuous pedestal, with a plinth and base moulding, and a cornice or dado moulding surmounting the die. This continuous pedestal with its moulding is sometimes only made of stucco or plaster; but in well-finished rooms is constructed of wood, and is usually about the height of the back of a chair. Its present purpose, when employed, is to protect the stucco-work or paper of the walls, but originally it was used as an architectural decoration to the room.
"The dado is made of deal boards, glued edge to edge, the heading joints ploughed and tongued together, and the back keyed; the stuff generally employed for this purpose is whole deal; the keys are always made to taper in their breadth, and may be about three inches broad in the middle; they are let into the back of the dado by a transverse groove, which is either wider at the bottom than at the surface, or it is first made of a square section, which is again grooved on each side next to the bottom. Though the keys should shrink, those of this last form will always keep their inner surface close to the bottom of the grooves.
"Some workmen prefer the broad end of the key to be placed downwards; the lower end should rest firmly, either upon the ground or floor, and the dado should be left at liberty to slide downwards upon the keys. Others, again, prefer the wide end of the key to be placed upwards, and the dado to be fixed by this; the key, as it shrinks, will fall down from its own weight."
What strikes me is that the "transverse groove" across the back of the dado boards may well have been established with "dado" or double nickered "jack rabbet" planes. This groove could then have been modified to form a tapered sliding dovetail joint or "T-slot" (as I interpret the text). Possibly, the transverse grooves and the planes which produced them, came to have the term "dado" attached to them by association through their usage on the dado boards?
Needless to say, this is a conjectural theory, and I put it forth purely for its heuristic value.
Don McConnell Eureka Springs, AR
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"damian penney" wrote in message

I once walked into a butcher shop in Hounslow, UK, asked clearly and plainly for a steak (with just a modicum of Texicoonass accent I am certain, for I had just spent the past three years in Australia/New Zealand) and was informed implicitly "We don't have steak here, mate ... this is a butcher shop!"
Still trying to figure that one out 43 years later. There ain't no telling about the English language ...
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As much as you guys discuss / argue words in this thread, I can't help but thank the Earl for my favorite new expression:
"Faffing"
I love it!
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B A R R Y wrote:

That was in another thread,wasn't it?
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