I Need advice on tool purchases

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Hey , hey, Hey!!!!!!! ;~)
I

Actually I have bought more Systematic blades between 1988 and 1999 than I have Forrest baldes. I will agree that they do do a good job. Up until I mounted a Forrest I thought the Systematic was a steal at $59. But like many others I prefer the Forrest. I very very seldom have to do anything to a cut edge before applying the finish. For me that is worth the difference in price. And the price difference comes out closer to a 40% price difference and or 66% more expensive.

You might want to take a look at the Triton prices. IIRC they are well over $100 cheaper than they were 3 or 4 years ago. IIRC they may be on the cheap end these days. http://woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyidE19
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On Mon, 3 Dec 2007 16:05:17 -0600, "Leon"

Have you tried the Freud Glue-Line blade?
Renata

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No, no need to.

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On Tue, 4 Dec 2007 11:09:13 -0600, "Leon"

Except half the $.
Renata

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"Renata" wrote

I have one, as well as three Forrest blades (WWII's and Chopmaster) and I do like it. I use FGL mostly for ripping thick hardwood stock for making panels.
Although I don't think the cut surface is any better, the Freud Glue-Line Rip does rip thicker hardwood stock more effortlessly than the combination Forrest WWII due to the set of the teeth.
I could live with either one, but if I have to do a lot of ripping I grab the Freud.
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Andy H wrote:

I'd say hold onto your money until you really know what you _need_ to do what you're trying to do, myself. (I know, like LRod, I'm up for the heresy stake! :) ).
I agree w/ Leon for what it sounds like you have/intend, the DC early on would seem to be a luxury that probably won't accomplish that much in terms of what it can actually capture at the source which is their real advantage.
OTOH, for what I typically do/way I've become accustomed to work, the jointer is probably the secondmost used of the stationary tools behind (barely) the tablesaw and planer. But, I reclaim a lot of old stuff that isn't that flat often unlike Leon don't much care for the trouble involved in trying to do that step w/ the planer.
I don't know what you're using for a blade on the TS now, but while I agree the WWII is excellent, there are others less expensive. But, if your heart is set on it, I won't say you would go wrong there as an investment.
For the router, can't comment too much on Triton; never had opportunity to see one even--been satisfied w/ the Hitachi and Makita I have (and I can't think of models, undoubtedly they're now old enough to be out of production anyway) but for most stuff I use the shaper rather than router anyway unless it's smaller or need the plunge or the mobility of working on fixed pieces.
But, as rare as it is in the rec, :) I really think when you know what you need is the time to go shopping, not just when you have a whim. IOW, start on your projects and see where you're stuck doing something the hard way and then decide what it takes to solve that problem. You'll probably be happier in the long run.
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dpb wrote:

I think that's the best piece of advice I've seen on this topic.
When I started thinking about seriously getting into the hobby, I set up a wish list at a few stores, including Lee Valley. It was tough with LV especially because there were so many things in their catalog I felt I needed and didn't want a behemoth wish list. Even with my pared down list, I found that as time went on, the original "must haves" were eliminated and replaced with other things that looked more applicable to the things I was doing and my skill level, which changed my perspective considerably.
In the last few years, I don't think I've bought anything that I haven't used, but each item has been on the list for a long time, waiting for the real "need:" for it and available cash.

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Tanus

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I went for years with a jointer and not planer. Then I got a planer and I don't know how I got along without it. It helps create incredibly uniform material that's easy to square and build. It also save a little money if you buy rough wood.
I don't know what you mean by "carts," but if you are doing any curve work, you might consider a bandsaw as well.
I agree with others that a dust collector is a luxury since you are not working in the house, where it might be a necessity.
S.
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wrote:

I'd want a jointer, the table saw's companion.
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Please help me understand this (newbe here). If I rip a board along a fence on a table saw with a decent blade, I assume I'll end up with a pretty nice cut. Will the jointer give me something "extra"?
Thanks, Bill
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wood that way (but the other edge was straight but rough). And, you can make a sled to guide curved boards through the saw, or you can make a jig for use with a router.
Otherwise, you run the risk of kickback. Kickback can be very hazardous to your health.
Jim
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Bill wrote:

start with. Ripping on the table saw will then give a uniform width.
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Bill wrote:

Yup!
The jointer will straighten the edge that goes against the TS fence, as well as set the edge to a perfect angle referenced from a face. If the edge riding against the TS fence has a curve, or the board has a bow or crook, the edge you'll get off the blade will be less accurate.
Also, properly prepared stock is far less likely to kick back.
A jointer will also flatten a face.
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You will end up with a "pretty nice" cut "maybe" but it may or may not create a straight board.
A table saw will only create a board with equal distance between sides "if" one side is straight and against the fence during the cut.
Bill wrote:

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Thank you for your reply Pat. Barry's explanation explained how subtle things could go wrong. I definitely did not realize how many factors came into play. I may have to get by with my smoothing plane for a while...

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: Thank you for your reply Pat. Barry's explanation explained how subtle : things could go wrong. I definitely did not realize how many factors came : into play. I may have to get by with my smoothing plane for a while...
You can joint an edge using a router in a router table, or a table saw.
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/2005/01/28/wb /
http://www.newwoodworker.com/tsjointjig.html
http://www.woodshopdemos.com/rtrplnr.htm
As far as I know you can't joint (flatten) a face without a jointer. I >think< I understand why you can't flatten a face on a planer, but I don't understand why they don't make planers that can also flatten a face.
______________________ XXXX _____________________ XXXXXX XXXXXX <--- cutter XXXX
(I'm very grateful to the experienced and knowledgable people in this group who take the time to explain things to newbies like me.)
--- Chip
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wrote:

With the proper jig, you absolutely can flatten a face with a planer.
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: > As far as I know you can't joint (flatten) a face without a jointer. : > I >think< I understand why you can't flatten a face on a planer, but I : > don't understand why they don't make planers that can also flatten a : > face.
: With the proper jig, you absolutely can flatten a face with a planer.
Thanks, Leon.
So I just make a flat, stiff, and parallel surface, attach the wood to be flattened to one side, and use shims so that the rollers don't flex the wood as it goes through. Then send that through the planer and the face opposite the jig becomes flat and parallel to the jig.
Do I have it right?
What's a good way to fasten the work to the jig? Double sided tape?
Thanks again,
--- Chip
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You are very close Chip.

Actually if you attach anti-slip sand paper to the wedges the wood stays in place very well without being fastened down.
IIRC FWW had an article with plans on building that jig and I built one myself. I can probably did up the plans in .pdf if you would like a copy. I would be glad to e-mail you a copy. I was able to flatten rough cut 4/4 oak 8-13" wide and 8' long with the jig and my stationary planer. That would be pretty tough to do with most any jointer unless you start getting into the 12" and larger jointers.
Keep in mind that the boards need to pretty straight and flat to be able to joint a board that wide and long and have at leas 3/4 left when you are done. If the board have much bow or warp you would be better off ripping with a BS and or shortening the board to begin with to minimize the bow or warp.
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