i need advice on how to proceed with my oak kitchen table

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Karen wrote:

From the dates on the pictures, this even happened in 2004. Excuse me, but why are you asking about a project that is NINE years old?
Deb
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No telling with that scammer outfit. What they do is aggregate Usenet groups and add advertising ... IOW, they profit off the freely given advice we proffer here ... Scumbags one and all.
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I do not think I sanded vertically. The marks are smooth as well. I am posting new pictures. I do not know how to reset the date on my camera.
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I do not think I sanded vertically and the finish is smooth to touch. click to open the full size version of the image
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wrote in message

Pull the leaves apart and give us a picture or two of the EDGE of the apron and of its back. Don't worry about getting really close, sharpness counts for more.
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dadiOH
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On 8/11/2013 2:24 PM, dadiOH wrote:

No point -- that picture is perfect. Look at the RH section--besides the previous ability to see the vertical grain in the substrate in the middle section from the end to the right a couple inches that tapers from nearly the full width to a rounded end at the right as the thickness gradually increases to obscure it, there are two other clear indications--
a) in the decorative saw kerf it's very apparent that is _not_ grain in the horizontal direction but that of the ply substrate (looks pretty much like luan or similar), and
b) there's a small missing roughly triangular section at the corner which shows the edge of the veneer where the corner broke and the vertically oriented grain of the substrate beneath.
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On 8/11/2013 12:44 PM, Karen wrote:

I'm sure you didn't and I'm also sure you sanded thru the veneer... :)
See previous response for my suggested resolution path.
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wrote in message

Thank you,Karen. I wish they were sharper but they are sharp enough to show that the apron is, indeed, solid oak as I thought originally.
Naturally, dpb now agrees that the apron is solid but asserts that it has a piece of "bending ply" over it (which would mean it isn't solid oak). That is certainly possible but I have to ask myself why any manufacturer would make the apron out of solid oak and then stick a piece of oak veneer ply on top of it. I could understand - maybe - applying veneer to it but not ply. For example, if the maker wanted the apron to be "tiger oak" he might have applied a veneer of that over the apron. (Tiger oak is oak that displays a distinctive grain due to the way it is cut from the log; because the apron is circular, it would not be possible to have all of it display that grain pattern if the apron was sawn out of tiger oak boards; bent, yes, sawn, no).
He also cites the "bright vertical line" as proof of his thesis. Again, that is possible. It is also possible - probable,IMO - that the "bright vertical line" is just a reflection from your flash. That edge curves inward slightly, as shown in your first set of photos. Since it curves inward, the edge will be more perpendicular to your camera and will reflect light more than the other areas. FWIW, I was a photographer for more than 50 years.
He also thinks he sees a glue line between the top and its edge molding. I can't see that. I *DO* see something on the bottom surface of the table that wraps around to the back edge of the molding but I have no idea what it is or what purpose it serves. If that is what he sees as a glue line,he is wrong.
Finally, he keeps suggesting you apply new veneer as a fix. It would be possible to do that but it would look a fright without a lot of prep work. The apron has dings and nicks...those would need to be filled/repaired; that edge with the "bright vertical line" would need work so that it didn't curve inward as veneer doesn't bend well in that direction and won't bend at all in two (which you would need). Both the prep work and actual veneering take a fair measure of skill and I wouldn't suggest it to you.
I wish I could tell you unequivocally how to procede but I cannot; the photos just aren't sharp enough to be 100% sure. However, you should be able to tell by close examination of the apron edge whether or not the solid wood has any kind of facing applied to it. If it has not, make the face good and varnish; if it has, your best option would be paint. Paint could look very good there, either painting all of it or just the top part, down to but not including the kerf, leaving the bottom varnished.
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dadiOH
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