I need a finish

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I need a finish for wood that is extremely tough, I once saw a TV documentary showing a country gunsmith, he makes everything, the barrels and all the parts and stocks himself. But my curiosity is that it showed him using a chemical that disolves iron shavings, which he used as the finish on the wood, soaked in and further topically with more coatings. Does anyone know what this chemical is?
Thanks all,
Alex
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I need a finish for wood that is extremely tough, I once saw a TV documentary showing a country gunsmith, he makes everything, the barrels and all the parts and stocks himself. But my curiosity is that it showed him using a chemical that disolves iron shavings, which he used as the finish on the wood, soaked in and further topically with more coatings. Does anyone know what this chemical is? Maybe Tannic acid?
Thanks all,
Alex
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Tue, Jun 22, 2004, 10:09pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@notquite.net (AArDvarK) queries: <snip> Does anyone know what this chemical is? <snip> Yes. The gunsmith.
No telling. Could be one of any number of things, including vinegar, urine, and so on. A little google should find you something, then do a bit of practice on some small pieces of the same kind of wood you plan on using. Or, maybe the guy just bought something, and didn't bother to tell anyone.
It it was me, and I wanted to use the same stuff, really, really bad, I'd try to get in contace with the gunsmith.
JOAT Use your brain - it's the small things that count. - Bazooka Joe
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You mean vinegar and steel wool to create a coloring stain? Not it: http://www.woodworking.com/articles/index.cfm?fa=show&idu7 This chemical I seek is a real chemical, it literally "dissolves" iron filings. That then can become a coating on the wood. I suspect it to be Tannic acid but there is vague info on it concerning this purpose. Whatever it is it should be some nasty stuff. My reason is for an idea for use on wood tool handles like my screwdrivers and saw handle, no major dillema. As far as "urine" I only use my own to feed a bacteria tank, for nitrobactors and anabactors. The result is good as a pre-nutrified water for plants, or the bacteria itself for fish aquariums. I also feed it fish emulsion. Sickening? It is the same as composting.
Alex
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AArDvarK wrote:

If it wasn't vinegar it was probably "aquafortis", AKA nitric acid.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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Yes that is it, as I found, thanks. Alex
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"AArDvarK" writes:

2 part LP used for boat and car finishes.
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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What is 2 part LP?
A.
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"AArDvarK" writes:

Linear polyurethane.
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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probably a good idea over using nitric acid process with iron filings, thanks. Alex
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Tue, Jun 22, 2004, 9:24pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@notquite.net (AArDvarK) again asks: <snip>
What the Hell? I just responded to the same question in a post with a time of 10:09 PM. You don't see it pop right up, so you post again? Try giving it a day to show up, next time.
JOAT Use your brain - it's the small things that count. - Bazooka Joe
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Oh, my apologies then... A.
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Yes.
Bloke called Bill Knight knows all about it. He's an amateur gunsmith, professional chemist and author of "Staining and Finishing for Muzzleloading Gun Builders", a small pamphlet that US gunshops should be able to find for you. If you can't find one, shout and I'll let you know other addresses for him.
The chemical could be a range of things, but it's probably nitric acid / iron nitrates as a stain / colouring agent. The finish over this would be linseed oil, prepared in a variety of ways, usually involving high-temperature boiling with lead compounds. An English gunsmith OTOH, might have been more likely to use a low-temperature boiling and allow the oil to polymerise alone, without adding metallic salt driers.
It's not a simple subject, and although I've done some quite complex forms of this treatment, any understanding I might have is simply lifted from Bill Knight - so read his text instead. I don't suggest random experimentation on your own.
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THAT'S IT! The rebel's are there!
Last night I did a search for "dissolving iron filings" and found this page: http://www.armoryhill.com/ask03.html but their link references didn't have the answers. Then their video reference did, "The Gunsmith of Williamsburg" with Wallace Gusler and narrated by David Brinkley in 1969. It is Nitric acid. Once applied it must be heated with a hot iron near it, then goes on the linseed oil. I was rather hoping that the iron is added to the wood as a strengthener, I guess not because such an idea would be great for wooden tool handles.
Thank you, and I will look for the Bill Knight pamphlet, I have a friend that owns a gunshop.
Alex
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wrote:

That's somewhat optional. It changes the colour, but you can also work without it.
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...nitric acid and dissolved iron

Here is the book reference, this book is not to be found anywhere as published, bottom of the page: http://www.codesmiths.com/shed/workshop/techniques/oilcloth
Alex
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Oh, you don't want to believe anything on _that_ site. Guy's an idiot 8-)
I believe http://www.dixonmuzzleloading.com can supply copies of Bill Knight's staining book.
George Franks is an interesting book, but it's really not a book for beginners. It's still my favourite reference for real French-style (pumice on the rubber)French polishing and the dyeing experiments are inspiring. However the explanations of the chemistry are thought to be somewhat dubious according to my semi-tame house chemist and it assumes a lot of prior knowledge.
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Old fashioned wood dyeing page: http://www.publicbookshelf.com/public_html/The_Household_Cyclopedia_of_General_Information/wooddyes_cbh.html
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wrote:

Almost every recipe on that page (from 1881) is a blatant rip-off, right down to the wording, of Robert Mussey's "Cabinet Maker's Guide" of 1827. Such plagiarism was fairly commonplce in the period.
Incidentally, if you're hunting such old recipes, Mussey is available from Dover Press as a cheap reprint. They do many of the classic old text too, such as Theophilus and Cellini. Sadly I still haven't found myself a Dossie, or a Stalker and Parker.
--
Smert' spamionam

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Thank you for that. Is this your website? http://www.codesmiths.com/dingbat / I love that steel brief case, it looks like something someone in "The Firm" would use for ... whatever, but it is killer!
Alex
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