I _like_ this panel cutter

Awhile ago JOAT posted this link to a quickie panel cutting table: http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com/panel_cutting_table.htm Or maybe this one: http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/w00035.asp I can't remember now.
I'd seen that idea before, but now I was getting ready to cut up a whole lot of half-inch plywood and drywall so I figured the price might be worth it.
Should have built this thing years ago. It works great, stores with the sheet goods, and doubles as a work surface. 13 bucks and change for the legs, about 7 bucks for the cheapest two by fours in the yard. Half an afternoon.
A sheet of half-inch plywood I just throw on the table, 3/4 ply I do that tip, lean, and lift trick. With a couple good plywood straightedges and this Makita saw, which I must say was really easy to tune up nice and straight, cutting any length and size of plywood is no longer a chore to set up nor a pain in my lower backside, and the only time it's the wrong size is when I measure wrong. I really have to do something about that. But I can't blame the tools.
When I get this much use out of twenty bucks and a few hours, I have to say something. Now I have, and I feel better.
Dan
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When I worked in a sign shop we had something similar. It was a 4X8 table with a 1/2" wide 3" high trim around the edge. Inside the boarder they had a 3" thick sheet of Styrofoam. We would place a sheet of Plexiglas on top of the Styrofoam and either use the saber saw or a router to cut through the plastic.
The foam would be replaced occasionally as it got chewed up, but it worked well.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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Roger Shoaf wrote:

Similar but different, I bought the styrofoam and purposely cut it into 2' X 4' pieces. I lay them out on the floor of my garage (where I bust down panels), make my cuts and carry the cut up pieces down the stairs to my shop (no scraping the drywall/getting yelled at). When I'm done the styrofoam gets stacked away (doesn't take up much room).
Of course my method means working on my knees and the OP's system is way better onna 'count of you get to work upright like God and Al Gore had intended us to do. I think I might be able to find a wee bit of room in the garage for the table frame idea.
UA100
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Yeah, and I'm getting reminded of all sorts of things that happened when I was younger, like whacking my knee against a hard sharp place a long long time ago. Now when I get down on my right knee it feels like it's sitting on thumbtacks. And since I don't feel comfortable wearing kneepads all the time just in case I'll need to kneel down, the table is a little more than a timesaver.
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Tue, Dec 28, 2004, 11:45pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@charter.net (Dan) claims: Awhile ago JOAT posted this link <snip>
I don't remember doing that, but will apologize for it anyway.
JOAT People without "things" are just intelligent animals.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in (Dan) claims:

THAT could be a good plaque for the shop wall! LOL
Patriarch
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On Wed, 29 Dec 2004 18:32:56 GMT, Patriarch

Shoot, that's the essence of marriage.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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Those table "frame-tops" are handy for cutting sheet goods. A tip I garnered from John Carroll was to use an old frame-and-panel door, knock out the panels, then you have a quick and easy table frame top. The wood used for doors is usually straight-grained and thus far superior to the 2x4s common in plans for the table frame tops, plus these doors are literally a dime a dozen at most salvage yards--or free at most any dump.
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