I Have An Excuse! Which Cordless Hammerdrill / Drill / Driver?

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In 6 weeks to 2 months I'm going to help my brother put up drywall in the house he's building. My HF and 13.2 v "FireStorm" cordless drill/drivers aren't up to the task of putting drywall screws into 2x4's so (Yipee!!) I'm looking for something I can use for (hopefully) many years.
Sunday afternoon I spent an hour or so fondling drivers at the local HD. The 18 v DeWalt HD/D/D feels pretty good in my hand, but I'm wondering about the NiCad / Other battery technology issues. I'd also like to stay "mainstream" so it will be easier to get replacement batteries in the years to come. (The 13.2 FireStorm batteries are available factory-only, and really expensive.)
I've also seen the "Drywall screws on a belt" at Lowe's and wonder what sort of driver / attachment is needed to use these.
Thoughts? Thanks!
-- Mark
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Keep in mind that (typically) more power = more weight. In particular, if you're going to be working over your head (i.e. hanging ceiling drywall), lighter would definately be better.
I've got the DeWalt 18v drill (not hammer drill), and am quite happy with it. I'd buy it again.
Clint

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If you are going to be driving srywall screw screws into drywall I suggest a corded drywall drill. Typically a corded dry wall model will run at 4000 rpm and some times faster and insert the screws faster. Typically the battery operated model drills do not run any where near that speed. Faster battery powered ones tend to be 1200 to 2000 rpm.
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Mark Jerde wrote:

I'd also recommend getting a corded screw driver. I bought one of those cordless Senco drivers. It's ok for drywall, but the corded one (Dewalt if it matters) drives the screws in faster, has more torque, and I don't have to worry about the battery getting weak. It's a little more trouble to drag an extension cord around, but worth it, IMO.
Or you could just buy/use a regular corded drill. If I had it to do over again, I'm not sure I'd buy a dedicated screw gun again.
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SSsssshhhuuusssssssshhhh!!! This is my chance to ditch the nearly-dead 13.2 FireStorm for something "real", like a DW!
<g>
-- Mark
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Look at HD for a lifetime Ridgid warranty... That's one I'd consider buying first...
I've been sold on a Makita ever since I picked one up. It was love at first lift. It felt much lighter when in usage position, obviously transfering the weight to my body effectively.
Oh, and you need two drill/drivers. One small 9.6 volt one and an 18 volt one. ;-) The 9.6v will do most the little stuff just fine and the 18v will handle bigger tasks like 2" and 3" screws. (You can also chuck a drill bit in one and a driving bit in the other.)
Puckdropper
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I ve put in a LOT of Drywall screws with my DeWalt 12V cordless and its light enough to hold over your head. The two battery set-up will give you enough juice to work all day. I built a house with the DW and ran over 10,000 screws with it ( and an old Craftsman 9.6V) Theyre under $ 100 these days.
I just bought a Ryobi P220 18V 3 spd hammerdrill at HD for 49.97/ chgr 19.97/ 2 batts 39.97..whole works for $ 110 and it wails !..but try and hold THAT baby over yer head for a while..
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wrote:

Yes, but have you ever tried a screw gun? I used to think these cordless drills were one of the wonders of the universe, and maybe they are, but not for all things. We had a pro drywall installer come in and show us (Habitat) a few tricks. Also had one of those nifty screw drivers. The difference was notable and I even talked him into loaning it to us (he was coming back to help out more than once). The screw gun is lighter and more suited to driving screws than a cordless drill. A cordless drill will work, and if you can only get one tool, than the drill is more versatile. But, if you can swing both, (and I've seen the screwguns for under $100), go for the screw gun for your drywall.
Renata

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Mark Jerde wrote:

Your at least using the 13.2v version ;) After bringing home a 6 amp corded Dewalt I took a look at my B&D cordless and it says 6v. No wonder it does not do much. Big difference!
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Mark Jerde wrote: > In 6 weeks to 2 months I'm going to help my brother put up drywall in the > house he's building. My HF and 13.2 v "FireStorm" cordless drill/drivers > aren't up to the task of putting drywall screws into 2x4's so (Yipee!!) I'm > looking for something I can use for (hopefully) many years.
Can't help you with the drywall, but have the 18VDC DeWalt drill for 8-9 years now.
Replaced the batteries, but otherwise, it doesn't owe me anything.
Lew
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Thanks for the feedback. I appreciate it.
-- Mark
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My wife got me a backup 14.4 Volt Makita Drill Set for Christmas. It came packaged with the smaller 14.4Volt impact driver. It weighs a lot less than the drill motor and does a great job. I just set more than 2,000 2" deck screws during a privacy fence project and the biggest problem was getting my finger off of the trigger before I drove the screw through the cedar fence boards. Best part is it is lightweight.
RonB
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Thanks. I haven't crossed Makita because of their color.... <g>
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde wrote:

get a regular 'ol corded drywall screwdriver. get it used- they show up at pawnshops and swap meets in droves. drywall is an unpleasant trade with a high turnover....
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The 4000 rpm screwguns are intended for metal studs; the 2500 rpm screwguns are better for the wood framing. Buying a used or refurb 2500 rpm screwgun is the right choice. BTW, obtain hearing protection...in use, the trigger is locked ON since the clutch determines when a fastener is driven. That's a noisy whine to listen to for hours on end, even if the noise is not from the one you're using.
The tool list goes like this - Screwgun, extension cord Speed square, carpenter's pencils Drywall square, utility knife Rasp or drywall plane to trim to fit Lipstick for marking outlets Regular claw hammer and pouch for screws First-aid kit Big honking circulating fan to blow air/dust out a window
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Sorry, I didn't kommunicate well...
Gentlemen (and ladies),
I have 3 cordless drills/drivers that don't accept charge very well anymore. Sometimes I smash a lighting bug and attach the ends of a jumper cable to each end of the smashed bug to attempt to jump start my drill /drivers. It doesn't work very well but I do feel a glow..... <g>
In 6 to 8 weeks I'm gonna help my bruder and his family put up a buncha drywall in the house their building. I kould show up with nobbat my undies and tool belt and Alla wouldbe kool. But that aint the point. I wanna throw away my 13.2 v FireStorm drill that, even though it's on its third set of batteries, refuses to take much of a charge. I wanna show up with a hammerdrill /drill /driver that goes
Rrrrhheeeeee! Rrrrhheeeeee! Rrrrhheeeeee! Rrrrhheeeeee!
and tightly screw in my portion of the drywall screws.
Then, when I leave my bruders after a couple days, having helped enclose 3,000+ sq ft with drywall, I want to take away the driver I brought with me. I'm hopeful that, with the feedback from y'all, it will be a very useful tool for me for the next 10+ / 15+ / ... years. My two HF and one 13.2 FireStorm D/D's have worked very well. With y'all's help I can make a good selection for my next "main" cordless D/D.
Thanks.
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde wrote:
> > Sorry, I didn't kommunicate well... > > Gentlemen (and ladies), > > I have 3 cordless drills/drivers that don't accept charge very well anymore.
<snip>
Cut to the chase.
Any decent cordless drill you select will represent a 1,000% improvement over the cheap crap you have.
Put some names in a hat and pick one.
The names I would put in my hat would include, Milwaukee, Panasonic, and DeWalt.
You might want to add Makita.
Lew
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*snip*
Does the motor still run well? I've got a use for a 13.2V motor... Seems it would fit quite well in a Garden Scale Model Train. ;-)
Puckdropper
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On Wed, 12 Jul 2006 01:46:25 GMT, "Mark Jerde"

Perhaps you should refrain from smashing the poor creature before you attach the cables - you might get more juice outta a live one...
Renata

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I have a Hilti SD4500 http://www.us.hilti.com/holus/modules/prcat/prca_navigation.jsp?OID=-16781
It has an attachment that takes the screw strips. It makes for attaching drywall very fast. Others like Milwaukee make a version as well.
However, unless you plan on hanging a bunch-O-rock - just nail or use a regular battery drill. The only problem with using a regular drill to drive drywall screws is they usually set them too deep, tearing the paper and thus reducing the holding power.
Dave
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