I got a jointer...... not sure if I wanted it????

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stryped wrote:

Silicone is absorbed my metals.
From the General Chemical's "GenSolve" web site:
"Silicone and polysulfide, for instance, bond into metals and are generally removed by mechanical methods that can damage the underlying substrate.
Their web site says that "GenSolve" removes silicone but I have my doubts.
See:
http://www.genchemcorp.com/electrochemicals/gensolve.shtml
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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On 18 Sep 2006 07:36:29 -0700, stryped wrote:

Paint thinner will not remove silicone.

Don't attack the tables with any kind of grinder, unless you are certain they are not flat and true, and you know exactly how much off they are.
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Art Greenberg
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I layed a metal square on the table and could see light under the middle. Did not use a guage to see how much.
What is the best way to determin if the table needs reground and how to measure it?
Can any metal rule be used as a straight edge? Art Greenberg wrote:

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On 18 Sep 2006 09:40:22 -0700, stryped wrote:

Only if its edge is straight.
Better to use an instrument built for the purpose. A 24" aluminum straightedge, probably just about long enough to check your jointer tables, can be purchased for around $25. Still, that's money that could be used for something more useful, especially if you can borrow a proper straightedge for the few minutes it will take to properly evaluate those tables.
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Art Greenberg
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If you are putting the straight edge on one table (not across two tables or one table plus blades), it might need grinding. Don't worry about small local depressions, such as minor rust pitting or small areas where a previous owner might have gotten too aggressive in rubbing out some rust, though.

Good straight edges can get expensive. An inexpensive alternative is a pair of plastic "draftsman triangles". I haven't used them, but understand from others that these are generally very accurate and not subject to warping. Sounds like the "lose out" in a comparison to metal straight edges (to the tolerances of concern to a woodworker) only in lack of durability.
Put two triangles "back to back" so that they form a larger triangle. if there is a dip in the table, when the tops of the triangles touch, there will be a gap at the bottom
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Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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Probably not. But you should try to remove it ASAP.

No. Paint thinner won't touch the stuff. See below -- I already described what to use to get it off.

It will get the tables true, yes -- but you may need to make adjustments to the jointer to get them coplanar.

I imagine that'd be easiest.

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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No.
Probably not but I wouldn't worry too much about that until I got the tables in line with each other.

You very likely do NOT need to do that.

I doubt you need to take it to the grinder but I suspect you might need to take the thing apart to clean it up and remove any debris from the table grooves to get them in line. It's not a difficult process but it does take some time. In the end, you'll be glad you did it.
Mike O.
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Grinding won't help your table alignment problem, and is gross overkill for rust or other surface clean-up. Useful if the tables are warped (i.e., if a straight edge on ONE table shows a general cupping or bow, or if winding sticks (DAGS) show a twist in one table or the fence face.)
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Would brake cleaner work?
I can look for that stuff but have never heard of it. Doug Miller wrote:

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No.
That's what you need.

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

I admit I have never tried to get silicon off of an iron table before, but it seems to be that if it can mess up finishing on wood, then apparently the wood must be taking some of it off... if the wood is removing it, it seems like it shouldn't be that hard to get it off of there...
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The problem is that the stuff isn't soluble in most common solvents. The only ones that I've observed to have any real effect on it are the chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethane (the supposedly safer replacement for carbon tetrachloride, AKA tetrachloromethane) and, believe it or not, common household vinegar. Of course, vinegar isn't a real good thing to put on cast iron...
I have observed the following solvents to *not* remove the residue of silicone caulk from a bathtub and bath tiles:
soap & water dish detergent ammonia ethyl alcohol isopropyl alcohol paint thinner acetone xylene turpentine lacquer thinner
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

(snip)
...and even sanding just spreads it around.
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Yep.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I have the identical machine. It was given to me by a friend. It had been stored in the back of a shop for years and had dull knives, no motor, no stand, and the bearings were bad. And it was a ball of rust. But I took it completely apart, cleaned off most of the rust, re-painted it, built a stand and spent about $150 bucks to replace the missing/bad parts. It still has rust stains on the beds but they are flat. After re-alignment it works like a champ.
I bought new knives at Sears for about $30, part number 92293. They're pretty standard.
If you don't know much about jointers, PLEASE read up on them before you turn this thing on. There is a lot of stuff on the web on alignment and safe use.
Don
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How did you tell the bearings were bad? Thanks so much for that part number. Does yours work well edge and face jointing? What size boards can you use on it?
I have read alot. I think the ifrst thing I need to do is adjust the table. Do you have any advice?
Mine is missing the guard. I guess there is no hope finding a replacement? Don Wheeler wrote:

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Is that the right part number? I went to sears.com and they had a different number and they were 24.99? Don Wheeler wrote:

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I should have mentioned that I bought these about 10 years ago. They may not carry them now or changed the part number. I still have the box. I store the old blades in it. I figured that some day I might have them sharpened. Anyway, the writing on the box says "Fits all craftsman 6 1/8 inch jointer/planers". YOu could take one of the old knives down to your local Sears and compare them with what they have. I think thats what I did.
About the missing guard. To me, that would be a show stopper. I wouldn't want to run it without a guard. Jointers are scary enough even with a guard.
Figuring out that the bearings were bad was easy. They went crunch crunch when I rotated the cutter. They are a standard size. I took one to a local bearing supply house and they sold me equivalent replacements.
Don
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Any idea on where I could find a guard ro how to construct one?
Also, Don Wheeler wrote:

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Sorry, I can't help you there. I suppose if you could find something to fit the hex shaped hole in the guard return mechanism, you could make a guard out of 3/4 inch plywood. Take a look at some jointers and you'll see how they are typically shaped. Make sure it covers the knives in all possible fence locations.
Don
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