I don't get it, why is metric better?

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On 8/9/2016 7:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

The recipe for Coca-Cola is critical. When a batch comes out not quite right, they repackage and and sell it as Pepsi. :)
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On 8/8/2016 2:11 PM, Just Wondering wrote:

Glass or plastic, we no longer see soda bottle vending machines, like we used to. I actually recall a few in odd places.
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On 08/08/2016 4:52 PM, Leon wrote: ...

There are a couple stashed in offices around town I recall altho like the one you mentioned I think it's been probably 20 yr since they were anything more than "yard art". There's one of the chest types still on the showroom floor at the Chebby dealership but it's under about 3" of dust and old catalogs now... :)
Glass is pretty much a bygone; cleaning and recycling is just too expensive. About all I see any more are imports coming up from Mexico by the immigrant population bringing them back -- they're popular mostly because as somebody else noted elsethread they're mostly sugar-based with less fructose. (Some claim can tell by taste; the double-blind tests I've done similar to Sir Fisher's on the lady serving tea as to whether the milk was added first or later were unable to show a statistically-demonstrated case it was true for most).
--


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On 8/8/2016 5:00 PM, dpb wrote:

Scratching my head and thinking back a bit, I do actually recall, recently, a plastic bottle vending machine, IIRC it took dollar bills.
But I was thinking where you put the money in a grab the bottle from a slot. The few recent ones I recall drop the soda or water much like a bag of chips is dropped and then you reach inside, to the bottom, through a spring loaded door.
I normally see these outside restrooms at shopping malls.
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...and credit cards.

Yeah, now a robot grabs the bottle from the rack and drops it into a basket.

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On 8/8/2016 6:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

We've gotten pretty fast and loose with the idea of what a robot is. I always thought a robot required artificial intelligence, not just mechanical linkage however complex it might be.
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wrote:

Nope, no intelligence needed. A CNC machine is a robot.
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There are taste differences, but I think real sugar coke vs HFCS coke wasn't that great. The glass bottle coke vs plastic might taste different because of the way the container hits your mouth.
Now, Mountain Dew vs Mountain Dew Throwback (real sugar), there's a definite taste difference. The Throwback has a lighter feel and a different finish.
Puckdropper
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On 8/8/2016 9:55 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Exactly any why caned sodas never tasted as good a glass bottled IMHO.

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So drink it out of a glass (says one drinking Diet Coke out of a 44oz. Styrofoam cup ;-).
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On 8/9/2016 8:09 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Actually I believe it is the size opening along with the ability of the glass bottle to stay cold a little longer than a plastic bottle.
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Remember the steel cans ? Before Al. The Steel ones would die after a while (shelf life) as the acid would find a break in the coated ones. Dr. Pepper tasted better with extra iron.
I was overseas and with 6 weeks on a ship to our dock and maybe a month of waiting in the storehouse before coming...
The steel would start to leak. So policy came about that we only bought what we could drink in xxx days. Ship people to verify them and return (Ha Ha ) leaky Cans. I suspect not for the drink, to to see the process error or where the leak cam from.
Al was much better, different taste. Then there was Al coated. That changed the taste again.
I've noticed a number of drinks that were in glass are now in plastic. Pure glass is expensive. Clean pure sand...
Martin
On 8/8/2016 10:59 PM, Leon wrote:

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On Thu, 11 Aug 2016 00:02:52 -0500, Martin Eastburn

But you can not recycle plastic drink bottles for making more drink bottles. So we make carpet fiber out of them primarily. Glass, aluminum not a problem to refit into the production cycle. Now given that Pepsico is looking for at a .001 cent per unit to add to the profit line as a good thing, plastic most be a lot cheaper.
Anyone else remeber the two liter bombs Pepsico made?
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On 08/08/2016 9:55 PM, Puckdropper wrote: ...

...
That's what the significant (wouldn't say "vast" :) ) majority who took the double-blind taste tests concluded. Did this as a project inside a graduate statistics class years ago where there was a year-end class project for various teams within the class. We all had a team to design/conduct an experiment using class concepts and all the rest of the class were required to be the subjects for each others' teams. Actually was a lot of fun... :)
Anyway our team did the fructose/vis a vis sugar test, another did the Coke/Pepsi. The sugar/corn syrup fraction was statistically indistinguishable from 50:50; no different than coin flip overall. Coke/Pepsi fared a little better; it was just over 60:40 correct iirc; I've personally always been able to tell those two apart and am a devout Pepsi preferer over Coke (altho as I've gotten older I've gotten to where I rarely drink any soda any longer; we basically don't buy it at all anymore).
Just a side note; nothing of any significance other than it's almost 100F out and I've come inside and am passing time while avoiding office work should be doing...:)
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Interesting. Around here can vending machines have pretty much completely disappeared. It's all plastic bottles. I kind of think it's because so many people want things other than soda, and you can put water, or juice, or other things that don't usually come in cans into them.
John
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I see them (plastic) quite often.
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wrote:

It actually is more of a name. The original specification (from Thomas Edison) was for 1.375 inches. It became "35mm" when European filmmakers captured the market for it (Kodak originally could only sell to Edison, but Edison overlooked patenting the film in Europe, so makers there could sell to anyone).
John
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On Sunday, August 7, 2016 at 3:10:39 PM UTC-7, John McCoy wrote:

Those Europeans! They changed perfectly good .30 caliber to 7.62 millimeters, too!
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says...

Sorry, laddie, but the 35mm standard originated in the US with George Eastman, William Dickson, and Thomas Edison. Only it wasn't "35mm" then, it was 1-3/8 inch.
Fuji, Agfa, and others are the ones who "had to do it"--Kodak started selling 35mm film in 1892.

The best reason not to use metric is that not using metric annoys people like you.
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On 08/06/2016 10:15 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote: ...

Of course, just like Leon's initial example of converting _from_ imperial to metric, it's no more difficult to go the other way if were to really, really want (or need) to...

...
The key is the latter--we don't set out to the store to buy precisely a liter, we can only buy the container that's on the shelves. The manufacturers made the shift for one reason to satisfy the mandate of the EU that required it and doing so; it's only economic to have one production line for a given nominal size. It's fortunate that a liter is roughly 1 US qt (within about 5%) so it is essentially transparent.
But, ever hear anybody take that and say they're going run out and get 2L of milk? No, the innate volume reference of the US population is still the qt and 1/2- and 1 gallon milk bottle/carton and likely always will be.
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