I don't get it, why is metric better?

Page 13 of 16  
On 8/6/2016 9:47 AM, John McCoy wrote:

Yeah!
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On 08/05/2016 4:16 PM, Leon wrote: ...

3.57/25.4*64 = 8.99528... or, going backwards,
9/64*25.4 = 3.57187500...
It's just some idiot converting their original design documents from imperial to write them in metric to make them "acceptable" for the EU rules to be able to export product w/o having duplicate documentation.
It's much cheaper to reprint the datasheets and leave the product unchanged than retool to the nominal nearest whole mm so they do the former rather than the latter.
Likewise the 4.37 mm is 11/64" -- 11/64*25.4 = 4.365625000...
(Although I'm sure you knew this, "just venting"...)
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On 08/05/2016 5:37 PM, dpb wrote: ...

And I suppose there's probably some EU regulation that requires them to be precise to some level such that rounding to 4 is outside of allowable tolerances as if 1/64" is going to make a hill of beans in the screw location; you'll be lucky to keep it within that owing to grain unless it's a fully automated production system that pays no attention to such niceties by being full CNC-controlled or the like in a production facility. By hand, it's in the noise...
Or, if may just be as noted first, just gave the job to some flunky to compute the numbers and plug 'em in and nobody ever gave it a thought as to whether it made any sense or not...you can see the same insanity in the spec's for almost everything that is an existing product or made to match up in building trades to the common use of feet-inches in layout such as the 16" OC stud spacing leads to 4x8 ply and then the nominal thicknesses for it and on and on and on. It'd one-up the Caterpillar in Wonderland for riddles...
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On 8/5/2016 8:29 PM, dpb wrote:

I think yo may have hit the nail on the head there. ;~)
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I think so too...I didn't go as far as 64ths when I looked for a match yesterday.
John
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That's because they were made to Imperial dimensions which were then converted to metric. Hardware made to metric dimensions isn't like that.

LIke I said... made to Imperial dimensions.

No, of course not. But 4.37 mm is 11/64", 3.57 mm is just about exactly 9/64" -- and both are the result of some idiot making something in Imperial dimensions, then converting the dimensions to metric.
Why didn't they just make it metric in the first place??

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On 08/05/2016 6:26 PM, Doug Miller wrote: ...

'Cuz it was already made and it's much cheaper to markup and print new materials to satisfy the mommy-state of the EU than retool...
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There's another thing to consider here: when you retool, you risk breaking all your customer's jigs or CNC programs.
Puckdropper
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On 08/06/2016 12:08 AM, Puckdropper wrote: ...

True, the latter of which is one possibility for the reason in keeping the precision in the conversion; at least for the slides that could conceivably be used in such an application.
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On 8/5/2016 6:26 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

And while that sounds like a reasonable explanations there are some metric standard measurements on the slides that are a common metric standard. These slides are designed to be used with the 35mm system and does have some dimensions in whole mm's. But then there is a measurement that is 4.6mm (.18in.) Maybe they got converted back and forth so many times common measurements of either have become skewed because of rounding.

Yes but 4.6mm converts to .18" that is a little less than 3/16"

I think it was made to one standard and probably converted back and forth too many times with the previous results.

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On 8/5/2016 5:16 PM, Leon wrote:

3.57mm = 9/64". Such odd numbers show up because the original design of the hardware was done in imperial not metric. If you are using truly metric hardware you will find nice numbers like 5mm a lot but never a fraction in my experience.
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On 8/5/2016 7:31 PM, John McGaw wrote:

Actually 3.57mm rounds down to 9/64. If you want the accuracy to be that fine of resolution why not use easier to measure units. 1/8" would have been fine instead of 9/64" If the hole spacing/placement needs to be that fine they should specify what size screw to use in the hole also as a smaller screw will allow movement. But hole spacing is not "that" critical in this instance.
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On 8/5/2016 5:16 PM, Leon wrote:

As already mentioned, that is a bastardized imperial translation. I've been working with metric machines using metric tooling to make usually metric dimensioned parts. It is rare to ever see a decimal and it is always .5 on some small items.
Many people here bitch about having to use metric, but on the occasion we give Imperial measurements of parts for tooling made in China, they have no problem translating. Once you use it for a couple of week it is really easy. You never have to wonder if you need a 23/64 or 3/8 wrench.
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On 8/5/2016 8:06 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

international operations, drilling is in metres but in the US it is in feet. The situation in South America is weird. Although the countries have long been metric, they still drill in feet. Graham
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On Friday, August 5, 2016 at 10:29:33 PM UTC-4, graham wrote: nder if you need a 23/64 or 3/8 wrench.

That must hurt.
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On 8/5/2016 9:06 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

So are you saying that the metric system is like not being able to use all of the letters of the alphabet to spell all of the words? LOL
I realize that metric is just as easy to use as imperial but I can see how there can be some confusion if you are measuring a large difference in values. It seems to me that if all resolutions of metric measurements did not all have the suffix that they would be easier to differentiate.
Working with Festool tools you learn quickly to measure and convert between metric and imperial. There I said it, Festool! Get your points while they are hot! LOL ;~)
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We seem to do alright in that regard. The Roman alphabet has several letters that we don't use, which other languages like German and Icelandic do.
John
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On 8/6/2016 10:06 AM, John McCoy wrote:

Hawaiian, 12 letters, IIRC.
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Most of which seem to be vowels.
John
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On 8/7/2016 9:03 AM, John McCoy wrote:

LOL. Is that numerically possible?
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