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This weeks tip from WoodSmith suggests using a drawer lock router bit to get tight drawers.
Rockler offers a bit for about $40.00.
IMHO, that is a waste of money.
Much easier to use a dado set and T/S to set up a $200, 8" dado set 1/4" dado using just the outside blades.
A carbide dado set will do a lot of other jobs as well as locking drawer fronts which allows for the recovery of it's $200 investment spread over many more jobs.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Thanks for the tip Lew! I was thinking about adding some drawers to the workbench I made (from Swingman's design) a few years ago. Dados will definitely add desirable strength. What would you use for the bottoms (and front, back, and sides), 1/2" ply?
Bill
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wrote:

The bottoms depend on how big the drawer is and what you're putting in there. For anything less than 18", or so, and normal stuff, 1/4" ply is probably enough. If you're putting boxes of hammer heads in a 36" drawer, it should probably be thicker. ;-) I like 3/4" ply for sides, if I'm using dados for the joints (the reasons I bought a dovetail jig - thinner sides).
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On Friday, September 11, 2015 at 10:48:10 AM UTC-4, krw wrote:

How many hammer heads can you fit in a 36" drawer?
http://www.divetime.com/images/photos/assets/0/50470-work-Hammerheads.jpg
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On 9/10/2015 10:33 PM, Bill wrote:

> What would you use for the bottoms > (and front, back, and sides), 1/2" ply?
I find it necessary to build a lot of mid level drawers for clients, drawers that don't have to be fancy or dovetail, but that are serviceable, strong and will outlast most drawers you see in homes today.
I routinely use the locking rabbet joint, and pre-finished 1/2" drawer side material (available at a local supplier at 6 different widths,all 5' long).
The drawer side material is already grooved for the plywood bottom, and the top is rounded over for a nicely finished look.
I use the same UV pre-finished 1/4" plywood for the bottoms.
Here's a video I posted on how I do a locking rabbet joint on the table saw:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1w7iQFW4hq8

You can make a ton of nice, serviceable drawers, with no finishing required, quickly and at a cost effective price that can can actually be a profit center on a job.
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopGarageCabinetStorageDrawers?noredirect=1#5951319365912134706
If you need to make them wider, simply use leftover scraps from the 1/2" pre-finished drawer side material to reinforce the bottoms, as you see here:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShop327KitchenRefresh2013?noredirect=1#5942064779998629746
... glued to the drawer bottom, and finish nailed to the side, the nail holes to be covered by the drawer slides
Bet I've made enough to pay for a half a dozen table saws, and dozens of dado stacks, just from these drawers alone. ;)
AAMOF, I can make them so quickly and cost effectively that I'll often throw some in as lagniappe on a cabinet remodel, simply to replace the old, flimsy, existing drawers that do NOT complement the hard work we've already accomplished.
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Bill wrote:

------------------------------------------------------- "Swingman" wrote:

--------------------------------------------------------- As my consulting engineering friends are fond of saying, "Change in scope", "write up a change order.
My comment was based strictly on starting with a sheet of 60" x 60" x 1/2" (9 ply), and a cut list.
Being able to use dedicated, prefabricated and prefinished material totally changes the situation.
As far as the U-Tube demo is concerned, my personal choice is to avoid a miter gage wherever possible and use a sled and some cleats for smaller pieces.
IMHO, it is safer and you are less likely to waste material.
Of course I'm not on the clock which makes a difference.
Lew
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On 9/11/2015 11:01 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:
> As my consulting engineering friends are fond of saying, "Change in > scope", "write up a change order.

LOL ... Mea Culpa.
I would have sworn your post never mentioned material of any type, and, as the subject indicates, was about not agreeing with the necessity of the use of dedicated router bit in a WoodSmith tip video specifically entitled "Rock Solid Drawer Joints". :)
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------------------- "Swingman" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------------ If you don't include pre-machined stock, the bit becomes a nice feature, but unnecessary bit.
Your approach of using pre-machined stock turns the bit into a totally new ball game, application wise..
Lew
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On 9/12/2015 6:01 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Why?

How?
Your original post is about a 'drawer side' joinery method, using a dedicated router bit.
The material used - finished, unfinished, purpose milled as to width, or not - is irrelevant to that joinery method.
Regardless of the stock used in my post, you still must provide the drawer JOINERY of your choice.
Again, your original post was SOLELY about a bit that is dedicated to providing "Rock Solid Drawer "JOINTS", _irrespective of material_ .
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-----------------------------------------------------------------------"Swingman" wrote:> I would have sworn your post never mentioned material of any type,> and, as the subject indicates, was about not agreeing with the> necessity of the use of dedicated router bit in a WoodSmith tip> video specifically entitled "Rock Solid Drawer Joints". :)------------------------------------------------------------Lew Hodgett wrote:> If you don't include pre-machined stock, the bit becomes a nice> feature,> but unnecessary bit.------------------------------------------------------------> Why?-------------------------------------------------------------Using the precut pieces you describe eliminates a lot of T/S work,and makes the remaining stock prep using the drawer bit a natural.------------------------------------------------------------>> Your approach of using pre-machined stock turns the bit into atotally>> new ball game, application wise..-------------------------------------------------------------------> How?---------------------------------------------------------------You seriously reduced the total amount of stock prep for a drawer,but what is left lends itself to the drawer joint bit.---------------------------------------------------------------------> Your original post is about a 'drawer side' joinery method, using adedicated router bit.>> The material used - finished, unfinished, purpose milled as towidth, or not - is irrelevant to that joinery method.------------------------------------------------------------But it does have a major impact on the total amount of stock prep timeand the methods used to do the job.I just like a T/S and appropriate sled where possible.Don't get me wrong, I use a router for a lot of things, but fordrawers,given a choice, I'll take a T/S.Lew
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"Swingman" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------------
Lew Hodgett wrote:

------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------- Using the precut pieces you describe eliminates a lot of T/S work, and makes the remaining stock prep using the drawer bit a natural. ------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------------- You seriously reduced the total amount of stock prep for a drawer, but what is left lends itself to the drawer joint bit. ---------------------------------------------------------------------

dedicated router bit.

or not - is irrelevant to that joinery method. ------------------------------------------------------------ But it does have a major impact on the total amount of stock prep time and the methods used to do the job.
I just like a T/S and appropriate sled where possible.
Don't get me wrong, I use a router for a lot of things, but for drawers,given a choice, I'll take a T/S.
Lew

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On 9/13/2015 8:14 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Yeah Buddy! How about them apples, eh?

LOL The drawers in the photos, with joinery done on the table saw, blows that contention completely out of the water.
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"Mike Marlow" wrote:
Gezzus Lew - you think you could post this again in a more logical, and

------------------------------------------------------------ Totally clueless,
Try again.
Lew
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On 9/13/2015 7:43 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

---------------------> How?---------------------------------------------------------------You seriously reduced the total amount of stock prep for a drawer,but what is left lends itself to the drawer joint bit.---------------------------------------------------------------------> Your original post is about a 'drawer side' joinery method, using adedicated router bit.>> The material used - finished, unfinished, purpose milled as towidth, or not - is irrelevant to that joinery method.------------------------------------------------------------But it does have a major impact on the total amount of stock prep timeand the methods used to do the job.I just like a T/S and appropriate sled where possible.Don't get me wrong, I use a router for a lot of things, but fordrawers,given a choice, I'll take a T/S.Lew

Jeeezus, Lew ... that mess is as confused as your argument. :)
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Swingman wrote:

Nice looking drawers, and I couldn't ask for clearer instructions! Thank you for sharing!
Bill
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I'll put my 2 cents in. For quick and sturdy, I have built 100 + this way, 1/2 Baltic birch for the sides and 1/4 ply for the bottoms. I once proved to my wife that 1/4" bottoms were plenty, 25 years ago, when I stood on an upside down drawer that wad approximately 22"x 32". This was one of three pots and pans drawers.
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Shearing 1/4 ply would take an immense weight (even shearing psuedo-woods like masonite or hardboard would take a lot). So your two risks are the bottom flexing enough to come out of the groove, or the bottom of the groove failing. The first is unlikely if the groove is reasonably tight, even for traditional style drawers without a groove at the back. The second is unlikely unless you cut the groove too close to the bottom of the side.
John
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On 9/12/2015 10:26 AM, John McCoy wrote:

I will say that I do build my drawers a bit differently also. The grooves for the bottoms are cut for exact fit and I do not slide the bottom in from the back under the back side. The bottom is totally captured and inset into groves by both sides, from and back. It is captured during glue up.
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On 9/10/2015 7:18 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Well then I guess the same could be said about the dado blade vs. a standard blade.
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Leon wrote:

I think Lew's point was that if you have a dado blade you don't need to spend any more money. Lots of the woodworker media focused on getting woodworkers to buy more stuff, period. They don't really care whether you ever use it or not. Some folks see the infomercial and say, "I need that to be a good woodworker". Lew is just pointing out, I think, that it ain't so. If it ever gets out that the most important part of woodworking occurs in the mind, some retailers might be sunk! ; ) Of course, there are those who would argue that the most important part of woodworking doesn't occur in the mind, and surely they are correct too. Roy Underhill explained it all once when I train was going by so I didn't catch the whole thing...
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