I'd like your advice on a refinishing project I am working on

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Thanks for the detailed reply Robert. I will give it a shot. BTW, one of my friends uses Citrustrip Remover. Is that what you refer to as an organic stripper?
In any case, I will try the BIX products as you have obviously had good success with it.
Dick
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The Citrus products are just more of the organic products. They seem to work a bit on some products, not at all on others. The old standard of BIX products have been around for a few decades, and it has all the nasty stuff in it you need to dissolve something like poly.
A few more thoughts to make you project easier. Go to a discount store ( I buy mine at Big Lots ) and get a stiff grout brush and a tub brush. If they have those cheap plastic putty knives there, buy a 3" and a 1 1/2" as well.
After you decide that the stripper has done all it can, cast a bit of sawdust (not sanding dust) onto the surface to use as an abrasive medium. Scrub the finish off with the tub brush, and the sawdust will help control the gooey stuff. To remove the goo/sawdust left on the surface after a good scrub, scoop it off with your throw away putty knife.
For the inside corners or tough to reach spots, dip the grout brush in a bit of stripper and have at them. The smaller brush with the stiffer bristles will be a life saver in corners, copes, moldings, profiles, etc. For the finest work, those 2 for 99 cents tooth brushes at the discount stores work great. Use 'em, toss 'em.
Using heavy duty scrub brushes, I never have to use any metal scrapers, metal putty knives, or anything else that could potentially damage the damp surface.
Work in sections (plan that out) so that you can keep the wood covered with your plastic until you get to it. If you only your original finish to take off, you will be surprised how well it will go.
Make sure you wash it off with the lacquer thinner after stripping and after sanding. After the first wash, if you find that there are still remnants of finish or discolorations on the wood, apply stripper to the whole panel or side, not just the area with remaining finish. TRUST ME ON THAT. If you strip only a small section, that in turn will be a different color than the rest of the adjoining area when it dries.
Since you are only taking off one finish, I think that will careful application of the stripper that won't be an issue.
Before applying your color, wait a day and let all the thinner evaporate. The large open area will dry quickly, but little joints and corners won't. Apply your color as you wish, preferably over a very light sealer, and wait a day to make sure it all took well and the appearance is uniform.
Apply sealer as you usually do.
Once you get all the stripper off the piece and you are looking at clean wood, you will be wondering what all the fuss is about over stripping.
Once again, good luck and don't forget to post a follow up!
Robert
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Thanks again for another detailed posting Robert. I have to admit I was leaning towards trying PS as an easy way out but you have sold me with this post and another post of yours to get this back to the red oak I started with. You are correct. I don't want to learn a new way of finishing. I am in the midst of making a teak entertainment center which is a lot more fun than refinishing that dresser by SWMBO is hot for me to get the dresser done so ...............
Thanks again and I will post the results after all this is over.
Dick
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I am sure you will do just fine with the refinishing.
I am glad you get some information out or my posts. I am a serious night owl, and surf and read a lot on the net in the quiet hours to soothe my jangled nerves.
With that in mind, I re-read some of my posts and I am surprised at how poorly they read, how many simple mistakes there are in them, and how far away my mind wanders when typing. Couple that with with the fact I hammer away on the keyboard with wild abandon, editing as I type, and I swear I confuse myself!
So I am glad in the end you were able to decode the posts. If you have a bad weather day or so more before you start your stripping, there are more posts on this forum that have good insight into the processes.
I am looking forward to news of the project.
Also, if you hit a snag or just have a question, hit me back here or start a new thread to ping me and I will help if I can.
Robert
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the picture and ask the questions.
Dick
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On Wed, 5 Jan 2011 19:17:50 -0800 (PST), "SonomaProducts.com"

Even if you use a $23 Purdy synthetic brush. I'd never willingly brush polyshades again, especially the dark walnut. BTDT, hated the shit. I never should have asked the client what they wanted to use for finish. "Oh, I have some polyshades in the shed. We'll use that."
-- Some people are like Slinkies ... not really good for anything, but you can't help smiling when you see one tumble down the stairs.
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First rule of finishing is to test the complete process on samples of the same material or hidden spot before ever doing an actual project.
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As a rule when manufacturers finish their products, they use tinted clearcoats so they accelerate the age process. I took the time to look up the polyshades color chart and I'm willing to bet that your color is not the "natural cherry" . It's probably the Bombay Mahogany. look this over:
http://www.minwax.com/products/one_step_stain_and_finishes/polyshades.html#Colors
I hope the link works. despite all the naysayers of polyshades I'm willing to bet you can pull this off without stripping. Polyshades does suck if applied wrong. BTDT and I've ~also~ had good results putting on one good coat over a sealed product. Try it on your test piece and you might be pleasantly surprised. Whatta you got to lose? $15 for a quart-o-stain. BFD. If it doesn't suit your taste strip it and start brand new. Good Luck.
RP
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RE: Subject
Picture a band in the pit playing a bump and grind routine while on stage a young lady complies with the lyric, "take it off, take it all off."
Lew
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