Hygience glueing a chopping board

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"jmcquown" wrote:

---------------------------------------------- That's just to simple and low cost.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

My mother is still using the Mahogany and Maple one I made in the late 70's. I think it's a full inch thick. She doesn't even remember or care that I made it, but I enjoy seeing it still in use when I visit.
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I'll bet she remembers. I'm using a board my dad cut for my sister who painted a design on the back. It was a mother's day present in the early 60's. The design is nearly gone-- but sis burned her initials in it. I should probably wrap it up and give it one of her grandchildren. Nah-- I like it.
Jim
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Maybe the board in question is large and would be expensive to replace.
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George M. Middius wrote:

The average home wood kitchen board costs like $10... but I'd attempt to repair even a small board if only for the challenge... a couple dabs of glue is no big investment. And if not used within its relatively short shelf life glues become unusable so if ya got it may as well use it before it goes bad.
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tiredofspam wrote:

Quite right. Epoxy is the obvious choice -- just give it time to cure. If, for some reason, you can't find epoxy, go in search of a polyurethane resin. It's an industrial product and its fumes will kill your children and pets.
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On Thu, 06 Dec 2012 13:20:34 -0500, George M. Middius

Making ones own wood filler is a waste of time and effort. The only reason commercial wood fillers fail is because people do not properly prepare the surface... home made will fail as well. Using wood filler is is like welding metal, if the surfaces are properly prepped and the rest of the directions are followed the joint becomes the strongest part. People who say commercial wood filler fails it's only because they don't know what they are doing, most likely illiterates who can't read the directions. Making ones own wood filler when commercial wood fillers are readily available is tantamount to making ones own house paint.
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Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Because I've used both, and I know which one is both easier and more durable.
Isaac
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Yeah, all those huge corporations make wood filler by the freight train car loads as a joke... and all you can do is flap your lying gums... next you're at the big box hardware stores check out the wood filler, from two ounce tubes to five gallon buckets... professional cabinet making shops buy those buckets by the pallet, and naturally they have money and labor to waste, according you idiots like you. Plastic Wood and other commercial wood fillers IS sawdust with epoxy, dummy!
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Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

A few of them use a polyester material (very characteristic smell -- not like epoxy), and you can recognize them because they come with a catalyst you have to mix in. Most wood fillers just use a solvent-based glue (another very characteristic odor), and don't adhere as well to wood as epoxies do, plus, they shrink as the solvent evaporates.
Isaac
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On 12/02/2012 04:32 AM, Tim west wrote:

I'd run each edge surface over the jointer until flat, then re-glue with TB3.
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On Monday, December 3, 2012 6:19:20 AM UTC-8, Doug Winterburn wrote:

Yes, recut the wood so you don't have a gap. Water will infiltrate and breal the joint pretty quickly no matter what you "try"
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I'd rip it along the seam, lose 1/8" of width, and re-glue it rather than trying to fill the gap.
djb
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