How: Very simple platform bed

Hi
As a very novice DIY person I want to build a very simple platform bed, and am struggling to find any advice online for something so simple.
My ultimate aim is to have a frame with four chunky, square legs (around 15cm square). Mounted on these would be the 4 pieces of the outer frame (2 running length, 2 running width).
So to my questions: in order to support a king size mattress, is any wood suitable (strong enough) to simply lay on this outer frame, or would slats be more appropriate. If so, would be it ok just to fix these to the top of the outer frame, and what thickness wood should I use? Should I consider anything running down the middle of the bed (length or width) in order to add extra support to the slats?
Onto a more technical question, what joints should I use to fix the frame onto the legs, the front and side frame timbers together, and mounting the slats on or to the side of the frame?
Ideally the final construction would be easy to disassemble (for removal) and also not creak at all
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I made a queen size mission style bed and used pine as the slats to support the mattress it is pleanty strong enoug because you have to run a accross and yet on king usually 2 down from head board to foot board to support the slats. I used to deliver furntiure and but alot of them together and used their design to make the bed I have made. I hope that helps.
-- Log

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http://hamiltonwoodworks.com/drichards/Misc/KoaBed.jpg
Take a look at this drawing. This is for the bed I sleep on every night. No racking or creaking and it requires no tools to assemble or disassemble.
On to your questions:
Slats would be appropriate, especially with a king size. Our bed is a queen and it has slats. The slats are linked together with a couple of long webbing straps (dark gray in the drawing). The end slats have holes drilled so they slip over dowels in the legs. The webbing ensures the slats remain evenly spaced. It also keeps the slats together when transporting the bed--you just roll them up and go.
I've seen other bed designs that entail pins for every slat. That seems like a big PIA to me from both during construction as well as during setup.
Next, yes, you should run a support from head to foot down the middle and it should have at least one leg in the center of that support rail. Our queen has that although I didn't show it. The center rail is shaped like an upsidedown tee and the slats sit in the rabbet. The slats, then are slightly less than half the width of the bed. Hope that and the drawing give you some ideas.
Dave
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On 21 Jan 2005 10:14:40 -0800, the inscrutable "abaker"

Hmmm most platform beds that I've seen don't -have- legs, just a platform and base. Try www.Google.com with the query "platform bed plans" or "platform bed construction". It'll give you some ideas.
The simplest platform bed I've seen consisted of a rectangular set of plywood boards with 2x2 cleats to make the base, a pair of longer boards with slots for the center support X in the base, and a large sheet of plywood for the platform top. Who needs plans?
Another heads-up: most queen and king matresses are sold as pairs, a mattress with foundation box spring. You might want to source a separate mattress before proceeding with the base.
- Yea, though I walk through the valley of Minwax, I shall stain no Cherry. http://diversify.com
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I made a platform bed of which I am rather proud. Had been conjuring it up for many years. It looks like it is floating, as the legs are inset about 12" all around. Also, it is built a bit high so that I can fall out of bed and right onto my feet. I don't have any photos available. But, some relevant points, perhaps:
- The bed is king-sized. Mattress only. - I used 3/4" ply as the platform. There are two sheets. I left a slight gap between them so that any (even slight) movement would not cause a squeak. (Past experience.) If I had used a wood edging (see below) I would have also used biscuits (even if dry) and would not have left the gap. - There are two (basically) 2x4s on their side running the length of the bed about 12" in from the sides and from the head to about 12" in from the foot. - There are 3 2x4's running at the head, about mid-way (where two sheets of ply meet), and about 12" in from the foot. - The platform extends about 12" beyond the end of the mattress to create a floating "bench". - Legs are 2x8s with 3.5" wide, about 1/2" deep rabbets to match up with the 2x4s of the "frame". - I made the bed before I had my current collection of tools (e.g., biscuit joiner, TS, kreg jig), so I finished the exposed areas with cloth over padding. The bench has about 1" foam and for the edges all around I used foam pipe insulation. Some manly fabric and a staple gun gave it a tailored look, IMO. (No "H".) The bed frame structure is solid and while there is some give in the ply because of the inset frame (i.e., where it hangs over), the give is as I had expected -- gentle. (I weigh >200lb.) If nothing else, no more stubbed toes! HTH. -- Igor
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Check out:
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/fw_currentissue.asp
Great article on making beds in the new issue of FWW.

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The current issue of Fine Woodworking has an excellent article about bed construction. For a king size bed they recommend a cross member with a center leg. There are a variety of ways to join the rails into the posts. but they should be some kind of easy knock down joint.

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I built a simple platform for our king size bed using 2x4's, 4x4's for the legs, and a couple of sheets of 5/8" particle board.
I made my frame smaller than the mattress so it provides a "toe kick" of sorts. This keeps me from stubbing my toes on the corner posts.
The frame itself is a simple box of 2x4's, setting on edge, and screwed together with 3" deck screws. I added a 2x4 lengthwise down the middle for a little extra support.
I made the legs out of 4x4's and cut rabbets in the top so the frame would be supported by the legs and not by the fasteners. I put one in each corner, one in the middle of each side, and one right in the middle of the bed under the center rail.
I just used 3/8" bolts, washers, and nuts to hold everything together. Not exactly an appearance item, but because the frame is inset from the mattress, you really can't see the frame anyway.
I then screwed the particle board to the frame, and set the mattress on top. Very sturdy, and no squeaks in more than 10 years.

When I need to move the platform, I just unscrew the particle board top and carry the whole frame as a unit. Easy enough...
If you don't need the space under the bed, you could just build a simple plywood box or two that set right on the floor.
Anthony
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abaker wrote:

My build was simple, using 6x1 sides/ends with 3x1 re-enforcements to carry the slats and spine, flat 6x1 with 2x2 for the centre spine, legs attached one to each side and end, slats 4x1 dowelled to locate and hold the frame together. No tools to disassemble, no metal in the frame, all legs 4x4, inc the centre "king" (or humping) post. 12 years, 2 dogs, 2 kids and its still quiet and stable!
Niel.
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