How to true a plane sole?

I have Stanley smooth plane I'm trying to repair. I don't know much about planing yet.
The sole is roughly ground, and has a few small rust spots. I can see light shining through in a few spots if I hold a straightedge against it. I would like to true it.
I was told I could tape a sheet of waterproof sandpaper to a plate of tempered glass and sand the sole down using water as a luricant and a rinse. I tried this method, starting with 400 grit paper and taping it as flat to the glass as I could. After a few minutes I discovered that the sole was being polished shiny, but mostly in areas at the nose and the sides at the rear. It was as if the paper was curling up or the plane was rocking as I rubbed it. Not wanting to round off the corners of my plane, I stopped immediately.
What's the best way for me to continue? Is there a better or easier way for me to true this plane at home? Is there a better way to stick the sandpaper to the plate of glass? Is it just a matter of technique? What would be the best paper grit size to start with?
Thanks guys, Adam
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Jacobe Hazzard wrote:

...
...
http://www.geocities.com/plybench/flatten.html
BugBear
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Tuning a plane is more than just flattening the sole. In fact, that is the last step.
Scary sharp is the term you need to search on, there is lots of info about it. Try:
<http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&q=scary+sharp&meta= to get you started.
400 grit is too fine for starting, I suggest 250 then double grits from there on.
Make sure that the plane is fully assembled and the blade backed off during the flattening or you will have problems when you try to use the plane.
--

Greg


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On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 04:33:33 -0400, "Jacobe Hazzard"
Put the kettle on, make a brew.
Then stop worrying about ultra-flat plane soles.
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On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 04:33:33 -0400, "Jacobe Hazzard"

Adam-
make sure the glass stays flat.
set it on a good flat work surface- a formica countertop is about right. make sure nothing is lifting the edges, like the raised drip edge on a lot of formica counters or a piece of the tape holding the paper down. glass is more flexible than you might realize. it has to be well supported...
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Thanks again guys. I have yet to be disappointed by the helpful readers of this group.
Here are my thoughts now: Andy, you're probably right. I'm sure I don't *need* an ultra flat sole, but it sure would be nice to get rid of those rust spots and make the tool look a bit nicer. And I realized that the glass was flexing before I read your post bridger, you're quite right. I used the bottom of my plastic basement sink (NOT flat) because of the access to running water and the ease of cleanup. I'll try it again, on a flatter surface and with a coarser grit paper (I thought 400 would probably be too fine, but I reasoned that too fine would be a whole hellofalot better that too coarse, am I right?). We'll see how it goes.
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On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 22:56:49 -0400, "Jacobe Hazzard"

Sticky-up rust is a bad thing, so you should blast it with electrolysis. If you still have recessed shiny pits afterwards, claim it's the new "fractal corrugation" process for extra-low friction and better wax retention.
Mainly though, woodworkers should remember which way up the plane goes. Sharp side down, cutting some wood. Doesn't matter how shrp and shiny it is, if it doesn't leave you time to use it.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Sticky-up rust is rust that protrudes from the surface?
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On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 00:21:21 -0400, "Jacobe Hazzard"
Yes. If it's going to scratch or to leave dirt behind, that's a bad thing.
If it's a small hole, it doesn't cause any problem at all.
If the sole is non-level on the macroscopic level, then the jury's still out on that one.
"Flattening the sole" isn't about making it flat (no pits) it's about making it level (no hills from end to end). Apart from cosmetic reasons (if you care) there's no need to remove the small pits. Whether a plane also needs to be a surface plate is another question.
--
Smert' spamionam

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"Fractal corrugation!" I love it! Tom Work at your leisure!
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:I have Stanley smooth plane I'm trying to repair. I don't know much about : planing yet. : : The sole is roughly ground, and has a few small rust spots.
Jacobe might like to look at my web site - Planing Notes - Fettling a Cast Iron Plane.
Jeff G
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
Email: username is amgron
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Jeff Gorman wrote:

Thanks Jeff! I haven't had a chance to read all the relevant sections in detail, but I can tell your site is a winner. I learned about five important things at first glance. I'm going to read all the sections when I have time.
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