How to sharp inside corners

We had to make some L-shape pieces from 1/2 in plywood. We did use the table saw for the outside dimensions (2' x 2'). Table saw was used for most of the length (around 11") for the two lines towards the center. The last inch was cut with a jig saw. Obviusly the result was not as good as with table saw. To smoothen the last part we did use a stationary 12" sander.
There must be an easier way to get the nice inside edges. What is that?
Cheers, Ollie
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Ollie wrote:

I think I might have used a router instead of jig saw, then a corner chisel to remove the inside fillet left by the router.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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I have never seen or used corner chisel. It sounds a good tool for rough surfaces, but can it do a smooth finishing touch. What is the reference you use with that tool to get all the edges square and straight?
++ Ollie

most
last
with
sander.
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Ollie wrote:

Here's a link to a catalog listing for the one I have. It's self-aligning. They're available from a number of manufacturers and suppliers and they all work more or less the same.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?pageD837
Hope this helps.
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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Try raising the TS blade as high as it will go and flipping the stock over to zero in on both sides.
Bandsaw with a fence would work well, as would a (good) jigsaw/blade combo with a straightedge.
Have you got a hollow chisel mortiser?
How about a CNC router?!
JP
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Jay Pique wrote:

Still need either a reasonably powerful laser for the CNC or a corner chisel.
I suppose you /could/ cut a good inside corner with a 1/64" up-spiral bit in a couple of dozen passes; but I haven't seen any of those bits with an adequate cutting length to clear the chips/dust from a 1/2" deep cut.
Lasers that'll cut 1/2" plywood are a *bunch* more expensive than corner chisels. (-:
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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If I were a rich man, I would have a laser cutter, CNC, and HCM and playing with them all day long. =)
PS. Now I am dreaming for a tilting HCM. I am waiting for the GE 75-050T1 to be available on the dealers.
PPS. I will try the corner chisel for the 1/2 plywood cut.
PPPS. The surface from bandsaw is too rough for the application. ++ O

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Ollie wrote:

Reasonable capacity lasers are fairly expensive relative to most shop tools. The last time I priced laser cutters, they were more expensive than my entire existing 96"x48"x6" CNC setup. I decided that I'd best do without.
My HCM is a cheapie (<$100) from Harbor Freight and works well. I don't use it often; but have been satisfied with its performance so far.
I've seen good used 3-axis CNC routers for sale with a $2500 asking price. That seems like a fairly hefty sum until you add up the costs of all the stuff they replace. You may be able to find even lower prices if you monitor offerings on E-Bay and some of the CNC forums like http://cnczone.com/classifieds/index.php and http://www.talkshopbot.com
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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On Tue, 20 Jul 2004 00:07:22 -0400, Ollie

What? No water jet?
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How about the old fashion way like using a hand saw ? Clean up with a scrap of 1x2 wrapped in 100 grit paper.

most
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"Ollie" wrote in message ...

most
I use a jig saw (Bosch 1587AVSK), like you did, on inside corners that are too big for the band saw (read kick plate cutouts on cabinet sides).
A good jigsaw, a sharp, straight, high quality blade and, very importantly, a framing square or edge guide of the appropriate size for a saw guide, will generally give me a cut you can't tell from the table saw blade.
If you can, plans the cuts so that you can make the inside ones first, giving you a stable base for whatever edge guide you use.
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On Mon, 19 Jul 2004 19:16:48 -0400, "Ollie"

Band saw to leave about 1/16 of the center both ways. Carefully file away the last tad. Clamp blocks both sides if worried about splintering when filing.
Bill.
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Ollie wrote:

What kind of jig saw did you use? A Bosch with the right blades gives a remarkably smooth cut.

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--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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John,
It's a Bosh 1585 VS with "standard" blade driven manually following a line. What kind of blade and feed settings you recommend? Instead of eye-hand coordination, what kind of guide system is good? Should it be on left or right? Should I update my jig saw to a newer model?
++ Ollie

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Ollie wrote:

Am I alone in thinking use the power tool to get close and finish the cut with a good hand saw?
You guys DO know what hand saws are, right?
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On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 06:30:45 GMT, Chuck Yerkes

Sure. They are for sawing hands.
No you are not alone.
Bill.
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That's an excellent jigsaw. See if you can find an assortment of Bosch blades, and try several. In the manual that came with mine, there were recommendations on what blade to use for what purpose. When I read the manual, and followed the instructions, the saw performed MUCH better.
I guess there's a first time for everything, right? ;-)
Patriarch
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"Ollie" wrote in message

To make a long story short, to cut a straight line with a jigsaw, you will always get better results with a straight edge/saw guide to guide the cut.
On reasonably short cuts, I use one of two different sizes of framing squares only because they are easy to hold with your free hand or clamp. Any straight edge that you can hold, or clamp, on the workpiece along side the cut will do.

Whatever fits. Put it on whatever side of the workpiece will take it and is comfortable for you to cut on.

No need ... just get good blades and use a straight edge/guide of some type.
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