How to remove screws

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Our local pub closed and sold off some tables. I bought a nice solid wood oak one, with two drawers, but each was sealed shut from beneath with two large screws (to keep people from putting empty crisp packets in).
No problem I thought, but I can't budge the screws at all. I've hit them on the head with a hammer, and put in some oil, but nothing works.
It looks like I will have to drill out the screws. Does anybody know how I should do this? I have an elderly electric Black & Decker hammer drill, but would it work on metal screws? And what kind of drill bit should I buy? The screws appear to be standard slot-headed.
Thanks for any advice.
s.
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someone wrote:

Since it is on the bottom, I wouldn't do anything fancy. Just drill them out. Of course if you want to get fancy them use a small drill and take them out with a broken screw/bolt extractor. Get a set at Harbor Freight.
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someone wrote:

Since it is on the bottom, I wouldn't do anything fancy. Just drill them out. Of course if you want to get fancy them use a small drill and take them out with a broken screw/bolt extractor. Get a set at Harbor Freight.
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someone wrote:

Since it is on the bottom, I wouldn't do anything fancy. Just drill them out. Of course if you want to get fancy them use a small drill and take them out with a broken screw/bolt extractor. Get a set at Harbor Freight.
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someone wrote:

Since it is on the bottom, I wouldn't do anything fancy. Just drill them out. Of course if you want to get fancy them use a small drill and take them out with a broken screw/bolt extractor. Get a set at Harbor Freight.
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George just send once and wait a while. sometimes it takes a long time for a post to show here.
Alex
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AArDvarK wrote:

Sorry about that, my computer was screwing up. I would hit send and then it would just hang. Actually is shows up immediately in my sent file, but didn't this time so I tried again--4 times. Again, sorry about that.
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someone wrote:

;-) Glen
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Look at Woodcraft and Rockler for hollow screw extractors that drill around the screw, leaving the surrounding wood intact. You can then plug any unsightly holes with dowel material, or not.
Kevin
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see if you can pick up an impact screw driver, you put in the correct bit then rap it with a hammer as it is hit it turns the screw, auto mechanics usually have one. here's a link to show you what it is....http://www.brandsonsale.com/impact-screwdriver.html

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I've never known one work on wood - there's too much "squish" under the impact.
--
Smert' spamionam

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'bite' into the screwhead, and with your drill on reverse (and running very slowly) they will allow you to back out the screw. I think I payed $10-15 for a set of three different sizes. I got them when I was trying to remove some very stubborn screws from a hardwood doorjam (stupid landlord) and didn't want to drill out a plug. They look kind of iffy, but do indeed work. Just be sure to run your drill at a very low speed or you'll just strip away the entire screw head.
Chad
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I think the product I have is this: http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/ product.do?BV_SessionID=@@@@1859582674.1092689133@@@@&BV_ EngineIDeiadcmfjekddlcehgcemgdffmdflk.0&vertical=TOOL&pid952154000
The case that mine came in looks a little different than the one in the picture, but I think the drill heads are the same. I've found it is better than trying to 'drill out' the screw with a drill bit, because this actually allows you to extract the screw intact, with the least chance of damage to the surrounding wood. The extractor is very similar to a backwards countersink head. It cuts into the metal screwhead, and basically creates its own slots. It doesn't always back the screw out all the way, but at least enough to grab the shaft with a pair of plyers and twist it out manually.
If you try using these heads, be sure to run your drill as slow as possible and use lots of downward (ie. into the board) pressure. If you don't do this, the head will not bite into the screw, and instead will just scoop out the screw head, essentially cutting a countersink like divot into the metal. Then you have a bigger problem.
Chad
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wrote:
|Our local pub closed and sold off some tables. I bought a nice solid |wood oak one, with two drawers, but each was sealed shut from beneath |with two large screws (to keep people from putting empty crisp packets |in). | |No problem I thought, but I can't budge the screws at all. I've hit |them on the head with a hammer, and put in some oil, but nothing works. | |It looks like I will have to drill out the screws. Does anybody know |how I should do this? I have an elderly electric Black & Decker hammer |drill, but would it work on metal screws? And what kind of drill bit |should I buy? The screws appear to be standard slot-headed.
Guys guys guys.
If you *read* the OP, you should see that this fellow is likely in England or some English speaking country other than the USA. Telling him to go to Sears or Harbor Freight probably isn't good advice.
I wouldn't try to drill these out until I had totally messed up the slots in the heads. Get a *well-fitting* screwdriver and put a lot of down force on it while turning it with a wrench if necessary. This is probably a two person job.
If this fails then you turn to the drill. And no, a hammer drill is inappropriate. In theory, you want a range of drill bits. You will start off small and drill down the exact center of the screw and then enlarge the hole with larger sizes until you just remove the metal without damaging the wood. In my earlier days in an automotive machine shop, I've drilled out hundreds of broken studs in cast iron blocks and heads using this technique. But with a smaller, tapered screw in wood, this isn't going to happen.
You will not find the exact center and the drill bit will wander into the softer wood. Resigning yourself to this proposition you might as well just try drilling a hole(s) parallel to the screw shank and hope that this relieves some tension on the screw that allows it to be withdrawn. The limiting case will be when you drill a series of holes around the screw and break it out.
Good luck.
Wes
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wrote:

Assuming the slot is still good, better to use a screwdriver that :
- fits tight -can afford to be thrown away later, then; -hammer the driver into the head making a better fit, then; -heat the driver in the gas till very hot, not white or red, then; -hold the driver in the screw head transferring heat, then; -re heat the driver and turn once tightening, then unscrew.
BoroLad
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Thanks to each and every one of you for your interesting discussion of my problem. I've printed your postings out and will go away and see if any of them can help me. Wes Stewart is right, I'm from U.K., but maybe my local B&Q hardware will be able to help. In any case, there are specialist tool shops that might be able to help me, now that I know what I'm looking for.
Thanks again, folks.
s.
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Went to B&Q, looking for a suitable drill bit and met a neighbour looking for paint.
He suggested I drill holes *all around* the offending screws, yank them out with pliers, and fill the holes with plastic wood or some such. Sounds simple to me...of course, the finished product may not be a pretty sight.
s.
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Just ran across an add for a "damaged screw remover" Brand name is ALDEN Corp. Number is 800-832-5336 web addy is www.alden.com for something call and "X-OUT" extracts 6-14 screws including specialty heads. R. Wink

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Greetings,
The URL did not go to what I expected, however, a google search for the words alden x-out and the exact phrase "damaged screw remover" produced a lot of good links including these: http://www.aldn.com/x-outscrews/x-out_screw_remover.htm http://www.handsontools.com/store/show_product/?product_id 16
R. Wink wrote:

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There are hole bits on the market that will drill a hole around the screw. After you remove it plug the hole with a dowel. You then have body where you can replace the screw. If it is a finished surface you still have the problem you woled have with filler, but if it is to be painted you should never notice it. Good luck!!

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