How to reclaim painted wood?

Do any of you reclaim wood for your projects? What do you do to prepare the stock? I have some nice pieces but they are painted and I don't want to use paint remover. I need to plane it down but can't imagine running that paint through the planer. Is there any easy way to do it?
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A drum sander works great if you have access to one. I have an old set of knives I put in the planer for this purpose. Art
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A portable belt sander could be a good way to start, if you need another tool. With my 3" belt sander, it takes just a few minutes per side to smooth a 2x4x8 board. Removing paint would probably take just as long, switching to progressively smoother grits as work progressed.
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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RE: Subject
A 3x24 belt sander with 24 grit belts.
YMMV
Lew
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Puckdropper wrote:

One of my less pleasant but more useful memories from Junior High is of Mr. Bean chewing me out for stripping paint with a belt sander. He pointed out that the stripper to remove that paint cost a _lot_ less than the belt. Of course those were the days when a school could hand a 13 year old a can of methylene chloride without risk of hearing from the kid's parents' lawyers, Child Protective Services, OSHA, and every other agency that thinks that "protecting the children" is a higher good than letting them learn that pain stripper treated without due respect will burn you no matter how rich your daddy is or what color you are.
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I use a 9 inch disc grinder with a 24 - 36 grit to remove paint and cupping and then I plane The rollers on my planer slip on painted boards so I don't remove paint with my planer. Jerry
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/MyWoodWorkingPage
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/1974RuppCentair
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sbnjhfty wrote:

Use a sharp hand plane blade as a cabinet scraper to scrape the paint off.
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Nova wrote:

Eeek! Poor plane blade.
If you want to scrape, I suggest a carbide scraper. Relatively cheap and stays sharp much longer than steel.
Chris
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0) Most latex/oil paints are nonabrasive. 1) A plane blade can be resharpened easily. 2) Use a scrub plane.
scott
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sbnjhfty wrote:

Having done a fair amount of work with reclaimed lumber, I would like to offer some ideas:
First consider where the lumber came from. A few years ago, I refinished a pool table that I built in the mid-70s. It was finished with a "wood grain" kit (paint). Since I knew about the piece (made from poplar and screwed together) and knew for certain that there was no imbedded metal, I ran the rails and aprons through a planer. There was little damage to the blades but the time spent was well worth the cost of fresh blades. Curved parts were denuded (ooooh) by chemicals and sanding.
On the other hand, when a neighbor offered me his redwood deck, I accepted. This stuff falls into the category of "probably OK" but I couldn't be certain that there was no metal embedded in the wood. I first washed the wood to get rid of as much dirt as possible. Next I used a combination of eyesight and a cheapo metal detector to find the bad stuff. The detector wasn't worth the powder to blow it to hell ($20 doesn't buy you much) but I found a few nails in there visually. I pulled those out and next went after it with a hand held belt sander. This took off some more ground in crud plus bits of old varnish. Next I vacuumed it and took one last look for nasties. Finding none, it was ready for jointing.
The lumber and hence several pieces of mud room furniture look rather good. Some of the sapwood is spalted and can be displayed prominently or cut out as your taste dictates.
    mahalo,     jo4hn
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Acutally I "would" use paint remover, there are some very effective, user friendly, environmentally safe removers that IIRC are Soy bean based.
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scrub plane.
scott
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Instead of sanding, consider heating (electric hot air gun) and scraping; no dust, quickly gets through dozens of coats. Propane torch works, too.
Then use chemical paint remover on the residue; it's easy, quick, and effective, unless y ou have some kind of milk paint/epoxy/powdercoat odd finish to deal with.
When the finish is off, it's a lot easier to remove the nails so it can go into a planer...
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