How to progress from zero knowledge to cabinet making

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Prometheus wrote:

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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

There was plenty of MDF and its immediate precursors around in the 1930s.
OK, so the thick stuff wasn't the same density and the dense stuff was only thin, but "glued up rendered fibre boards" were certainly prominent, if not actually common.
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snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com wrote:

Sorry but MDF was introduced in either the 50's or 60's? I read an artical somewhere on the web about its first manufacture.
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Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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The3rd Earl Of Derby wrote:

oop's 20 years out. :-( http://www.trustile.com/about/default.asp?cidF
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Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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Wayne:
Any advise, pointers etc greatly appreciated. I live in Brisbane

Good luck. I'm one who believes, just keep trying. You'll make a lot of mistakes, but we all do, all the time, but if you keep doing, you'll learn.
I'd second the suggestion of a good woodworking class. I'ld look around at tradeschools, colleges, etc, and see if they offer adult evening classes. If that doesn't result in a hit, try your local friendly woodworking group. Should be one in your area, (try your tool shop that you mentioned or a lumber supplier).
Look for great books - Danny Proulx has some wonderful basic cabinet books out. He is since departed this earth, but his ability to educate live on.
And, as always, ask here in this group. Great bunch of people!
MJ Wallace
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Wayne,............I would suggest that you become proficient in two skills. Making simple boxes in mdf and secondly learning to apply veneers. Dont forget to put a balancing veneer on the back and get a book on veneering..its quite easy on small items like radios and you can get very striking effects.
Most cabinets in those days were made in this way and the process still applies for speaker cabinets today. Solid timber is likely to warp and crack with the heat geneated from old radios. You dont need many tools and your router and mitre saw are a good start.
Try some small boxes first with glued mitre joints.
and the best of luck.
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On Tue, 10 Oct 2006 18:53:46 +0800, Wayne McDermott

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Bob Smith wrote: Well, he actually wrote nothing i guess...

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Wayne McDermott wrote:

I recently picked up and was impressed with this new book: <(Amazon.com product link shortened)62383954/ref=sr_1_1/104-5139835-3138346?ie=UTF8&s=books>
This is also quite good: <(Amazon.com product link shortened)>
I have both books and would buy both again.
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