how to move machinery?

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Exactly. Thanks.
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Thanks for the URL. This is a great selection, and worth every penny.
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All the suggestions sound temporary. I'd put something in permanent to be able to bring up all those large projects ya built with this machinery.

375lbs,
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Few things you can make with wood will be as heavy as a honkin big ole cast iron piece of equipment. Some people never make anything larger than a coffee table. -- Jim in NC
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This is how I moved a Jet XActa saw into my basement:
1. Built a plywood ramp with 2x2 strips as "guardrails" at the sides, and nailed it to the basement stairs (using double-headed nails for easy removal).
2. Built a cart of 2x6 lumber, approximately the same size as the side of the saw cabinet, and attached a pulley to one end of the cart. Laid the saw down on he cart (cabinet and top only, no extension tables, no fence, etc., net weight about 400 lb according to Jet).
3. Braced a 4x4 across a door opening 6 feet from the basement stairs, lashed one end of a rope to the 4x4, and passed the other end of the rope through the pulley on the cart and back to my teenage son.
4. Walked down the ramp ahead of the saw to guide it, while my son payed out the rope.
5. Stood the saw upright on the basement floor.
Calculation beforehand showed that, due to the slope of the stairs, about 60% of the weight would rest on the stairs, and 40% would be loaded onto the rope. The use of a movable pulley meant that my son had to hold back only half of the load on the rope (20% of the total), with the other half being loaded onto the 4x4. So the stairs took a load of some 410 pounts (60% of the saw, plus 100% of me), the doorposts about 40 each, and my son about 80. He said it was pretty easy.
Note that the total load on the stairs was about the same as that of two large adults at once. Not a big deal.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Wow. "Oops, sorry Dad, there was this cute girl from the neighborhood walking by outside and I got distracted. Are you OK? Dad? Dad?"
:)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Before you go putting this stuff down the stairs, make sure that your stairs are built to handle that kind of load. A failure could ruin your whole day. If your stairs have the vertical backboard supporting each stair you will probably be ok. If it is open, I'd do a few calculations before I tried any of these, especially the heavy ones.
I don't have my manual handy, or I'd remember that your allowable stress would be halved due to impact loading, and that your worst case moment would be if you managed to drop the piece onto the stair from some height. If you assume 550 pounds placed in the center of a 3' wide stair without a center stringer or vertical backboards, then you will just exceed the allowable bending strength of a 2x12. If the stairs are 1" thick, then you manage to go over by a factor of 4. If you dropped the load even from a small height, then you will not have to worry about getting the machinery to the basement. You'll even have a woodworking project.
The sled idea sounds better because it will redistribute the load over several stairs. My question is what you will use to hold everything back. 550 # has a lot of potential energy, and as it goes kinetic it will require a serious beam to tie off the tackle to. Again, you could have another woodworking project.
While you are at it, very seriously consider the loading of the joists you are dragging this stuff over to get to the stairs. I'm assuming that you don't have the luxury of going across concrete until you get to the stairs. You could find some serious deflection at those weights. Gathering everything on the wood floor at the top of the staircase would not be a good idea.
Reduce the size of the equipment as much as possible. Take things down in as small a size as possible, with the equipment laying down on its side. Tumbing band saws don't look so good. You may have to make yourself a slide to put on top of the stairs, down which a sled carrying the equipment should be placed. Make the slide of 2xwhatevers placed side by side, or a few sheets of thick plywood with some 2x's to support them, with lots of support from the stairs. Putting a little sandpaper under the sled might slow it down a bit. Go slowly. A few inches per second is fast. A foot per second is out of control. Use a good block and tackle, with several shives to get a very high leverage. Figure that you can control 50# easily, so you will need 5 shives on each end. This is not the project to demonstrate how strong you are. Save that for the beer cans after the whole thing is done. Get a few friends, and have one or two in charge of nothing but watching and making sure things are going right.
One of the easier methods is to convince your SWMBO that her kitchen would do better in the basement, and that your woodshop would look better on the upper floor, after you reinforce the beams. This particular argument is fraught with danger also. There are many sharp objects that would have to be transferred in that case. Some might slip.
Michael

375lbs,
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Wow!
Talk about a response. I appreciate all the input from you guys. First I will put some risers on my steps to increase their strength, then I will also put in some vertical supports from basement floor to the steps themselves, and as mentioned, I will support the landing at the top of the stairs. After all that, I think I will use the sled and rope and pulley method for the big trip down the steps. I am not sure about how to keep them from tipping though, they are a bit top heavy and last time I removed the top of the jointer planer combo machine I had to get it realligned by the SCM mechanic, luckily it was back when I bought it and they didn't charge me for the service call, now it's about three years old and these guys charge about $100.00 per hour, Ouch.
Thanks agin for the input, it has been and will be helpfull. The big event will happen on or around the 27th of this month, I will take some pictures and post them on the binaries pics ww group.
Hey Mr. Munster, I hope you will be coming over to help!
Blair
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event
Lay them down on their sides or back, or whatever will make them have the lowest center of gravity. It wouldn't hurt to tie them to the sled, since you are not going to have anyone below them to guide them <g> -- Jim in NC
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Maybe contruction of a heated out building (garage) would be a better place to put them. Wouldn't have to lower them down any steps then......

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Yeah! Hehehe... I'll carry your chopsaw!
When?
John
Blair wrote:

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