how to move machinery?

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I am looking for suggestions with regards to getting my equipment down a straight flight of stairs into my new basement. I will try to get some muscle gathered up for the event but am looking for any input that could make it go easier. I will be moving in a bandsaw that weighs about 375lbs, a Unisaw that weighs about 400lbs, shaper 550lbs and jointer planer combo that is also about 550lbs.
Thanks in advance,
Blair
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First step, figure out if you can take the various machines into smaller pieces.
When I moved my 6" jointer into the basement, the sheetmetal base (with the motor installed) went as one piece, the fence assembly went as another, and the main table assembly went as a third (this was the only piece I needed help carrying).
My 12" bandsaw went in two pieces (stand w/ motor, and the saw itself).
The drill press went in several pieces (base/column, table, head).
If you're going down a flight of basement stairs, I think this is the most logical thing you can do. Let's say you and a burly friend weigh 400 lbs together. Add 550 lbs of machine, and you've got half a ton of live load. Are you even sure your basement stairs can support that much?
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A pipe frame and chain fall comes to mind.
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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Good except use a block and tackle. With a four to one reduction, the load can be easily handled. Do this from above. DO NOT put people below a moving load.

off.
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They would be highly motivated to not let the machine crash :)
CW wrote:

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load
moving
'Zactly!!! After all, I want something there to cushion the fall of the saw if it gets away from you!
Really, if done slowly and with good judgment about the machine being secure on the sled, there is little danger/risk. If the load gets so heavy that there is doubt, it is time to be disassembling something. -- Jim in NC
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True and putting someone on the downside of the load is not good judgement.

secure
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judgement.
If you didn't put it on a sled, how would you do it? -- Jim in NC
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I never said anything about the sled. As a matter of fact, I agreed with your method all except for putting people on the downside of the load, NEVER DO THAT. I spent a number of years rigging, hoisting and hauling loads weighing in the tons under the worst possible conditions. At no time was I or anyone on my crew ever injusred dispite loads slipping, cables snapping ect. The reason was that I never allowed anyone in a position where they would be in the way if something slipped. You never plan an accident, they just happen.

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I know, I was just asking.
As a matter of fact, I agreed with

NEVER
snapping
My point was that with a load the size of what we are talking, with the weight on a sled, and the friction of the sled on the stairs, it probably coulde be handled by the guys on the stairs alone, and the guys on the rope are insurance. Judgement must prevail as the type and weight of the load increases.
I have already conceeded. I'm a loser! :-) -- Jim in NC
4 guys could CARRY the kind of loads we are talking about.
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wrote:

I brought a DJ-20 in it's crate down my straight basement stairs two years ago. No base, no motor. I violated the rules for which I thank God nothing bad happened. That is, I used your plan. A rope looped around the trailer hitch of a truck controlled by one guy, two guys below. The crate slid on a pair of 2x4s. Two guys under "controlling" the crate. Well, in letting the rope out, it did slip a bit. Things happened far too quickly for the guys on the bottom to do anything about it. Fortunately the crate slipped to the side and stopped against the wall. What ultimately worked was straigthening the crate out and the two guys alone easing it the rest of the way (about 5 feet).
In hind sight I thing the rope should never have been part of this plan if the guys were to be there at all. I don't think there's any way for them to react and take up the load themselves if the rope breaks, is fed too quickly, the rope guy above lets go, whatever. Those guys are gonna be hurt when the crate comes down on them (in this case ~400lbs) If a rope with or without block and tackle is to be used it should be used alone.
BTW, I was one of the two guys below.
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Seems I am out voted on this one.
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D.B. wrote:

Unless it's your in-laws...
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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On Sat, 06 Sep 2003 12:20:55 -0400, Silvan

I liked my in-laws, God rest their souls.
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Start by being thankful that you are not fighting gravity!! Then slide the machines either on a sled as described earlier or on 2x10s. Use a good rope, (1/2 " nylon comes to mind) tie the machines off well. (Re read the Boy Scout handbook?) You should not have anyone underneath the load when you slide it in place.
You can control the slide using a mountain climbing technique called belaying, (similar to rappelling except you lower someone else instead of yourself). Wrap the rope around a stationary smooth round object a few times. The friction will slow the load.
I have installed several machines (South Bend and Oliver lathes, a 14" bandsaw, a 6" jointer, several workbenches from a school sale, and most recently a cast iron boiler/furnace) in my basement by myself using this method. In my case I ran a couple of turns around a trailer hitch ball served as a belay point for most of them. Once in the bsement a hand truck or flat dolly becomes valuable.
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On 06 Sep 2003 00:27:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Tchswoods) wrote:

Have you given any thought to how to remove them from the basement if need be?
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There is a special kind of handtruck designed to go down stairs with heavy loads. It is hard to describe, but it has two rubber tractor-like belts, one behind each wheel of the handtruck. When you run a standard handtruck down stairs, as the wheels leave the end of a tread they drop down to the next tread. With this thing, the tractor belts ride the nose of the tread. I've seen 500 lb classified safes moved down stairs with this type of truck, two guys. You should be able to rent one of these, maybe from a U-haul place.
This being said, a friend and I just brought in my new Dewalt TS -- only 275 pounds versus your stuff. We used my handtruck that has pneumatic tires that are larger than the standard hard rubber tires. The saw bounced a bit at each stair, but not much.
BTW, as someone else said, I would also suggest checking the stairs for their ability to carry the load. Of course, it should be able to, but who put in the new stairs?
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I would be more worried about to get the machines back up the stairs.... :)
wrote:

375lbs,
tread.
bounced
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Yes it can be done. All of which is in my basement. PM 72 TS PM S27 shaper PM 12 " jointer PM 160 planer Dewalt series 35 RAS (Original Super HD) Mini Max BS. In pieces mostly by myself. A good hand truck and a bit of Muscle will do it. Take as much apart as you can and do it one at a time.
wrote:

375lbs,
tread.
bounced
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He's talking about:
http://www.pbrhandtrucks.com/WescoStandardAppliance.jpg
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