How to make this profile?

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I'm planning on making some boxes for birthday presents in late January. The profile for the box sides is shown here: https://www.amazon.com/clouddrive/share?s=jV1_-IDETg4r_R18m5vLcs
My plan is to make a single piece about 48" long for each box, then cut it into four pieces for the sides. Wood will be walnut, mahogany, or some other hardwood. What are the options for generating the profile shown in figure A? The only important dimension is the 4" width, everything else is approximate. Profile B would be acceptable as long as it can be made uniform over the 48" length. If someone out there has made a jig or fixture that will solve this problem and is willing to share the plan, it would be really appreciated. BTW, I have the usual complement of stationary, bench, and hand power tools.
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On 11/26/12 11:05 PM, David wrote:

Make a sled for the router that will ride over the stock. The sled will arch in the shape of that profile. The router will ride on top of the sled with the bit underneath. google: router planing sled Build one with the top in an arch to match the profile.
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The sled approach is one of things I've considered however it appeared to me the sled would have to swing over the top of the workpiece on a 20" radius. I think you're suggesting an arched sled that could could be moved linearly along the workpiece. Correct? That would be much easier to make and it looks like it would work. Thanks for the suggestion. Any other suggestions out there?

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I would be inclined to make a jig for the thickness planer with a shim under one side so that it raises the board up at the edge. Given the grain, move the shim to the other side of the jig and run the board through again to taper the other edge. The edge could be radiused with a router/sander afterwards.
John
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On Tue, 27 Nov 2012 07:35:52 -0500, "John Grossbohlin"

I suppose that might work (and be safe) if he stuck each piece down with doublesided tape.
Q: Are these tapered end-to-end AND side-to-side?
I'd use a hand plane or cabinet scraper to shape and then sand to final smoothness; maybe 5 minutes per. Or if he's a total Normite, a handheld belt sandah for the whole shebang.
Alternatively, I wonder if they might be fully shaped and smoothed on a large stroke sander.
Practice on a couple scraps to perfect the performance.
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On 11/26/2012 11:05 PM, David wrote:

Hand plane would take care of that in short order.
Easiest way to get a little head start would be a pass on edge through TS w/ appropriate angle. Or, assuming you have a bandsaw.
Second would be the planer sled altho I often for small pieces like that will just tack a shim (double tape works) on the off side and use the jointer for a couple of passes...
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On 11/27/2012 8:22 AM, dpb wrote: ...

It's easy enough "freehand", too...just put a shim on the infeed table and then hold the jointed face flat on the outfeed table. After the first pass or two there's sufficient surface to follow directly...
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wrote:

I agree with C-Less. Hand plane (sharp!), scraper, sandpaper or block.
For sanding you could make a custom block out of autobody filler (aka bondo) from a shorter board with the correct profile.
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On 11/26/2012 11:05 PM, David wrote:

Just a thought, it sounds like a lot of trouble to make unless you have a molder. My local wood supplier is also a mill that makes moldings from most every common wood. Have you looked at some of the baseboard moldings? Maybe buy a buy a molding with a curved top, rip it in half and glue the two halves together? Something to kick around.
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"David" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------------------------ I refer you to Fred Bingham's book, "Practical Yacht Joinery" for a graphical solution to layout the profile.
Layout a profile gauge block using 1/4? hardboard.
Make a "long board", again see Bingham's book, and dress profile to piece.
Check profile frequently using profile gauge.
A good sharp jack plane followed by longboard final sanding also works.
SFWIW, I'm a total Normite, but this is a hand job IMHO.
Have fun.
Lew
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"David" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------------- Forgot to mention another solution to get a "fair" curved piece.
A 4", right angle, sander/grinder equipped with 60 grit paper.
You use sweeping passes (Think of a paint spraying motion) along the board removing 0.015"-0.020"/pass.
Standard practice along with a long board to fair out curved surfaces.
Practice on a scrap 2by4 to develop your technique.
Lew

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I'd prefer to use a technique that is less reliant on the user's (me) skill and more on equipment or fixture setup. But, I found an inexpensive copy of Bingham's book and ordered it "just in case". Thanks for the suggestion.

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On Tuesday, November 27, 2012 8:45:39 PM UTC-5, David wrote:

If you have a (suitably sized) shaper you could have a knife made. You could get an assortment of large router bits and see if you can cobble something that way. A table saw and a lot of patience with fence and angle settings could do it too I'm sure.
JP ********************************* William & Hussey could help too.
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I don't have a shaper and probably wouldn't be interested in the expense of a custom cutter anyway. But, my backup plan is to use a saw to remove most of the waste material with one or two cuts, then use a hand plane followed by sanding.

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"David" wrote in message
I don't have a shaper and probably wouldn't be interested in the expense of a custom cutter anyway. But, my backup plan is to use a saw to remove most of the waste material with one or two cuts, then use a hand plane followed by sanding. ========================================================================Plane to rough shape them grind a scraper to fit. It will give you the same profile all the way down, unlike sanding.
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Another good suggestion. I have an old scraper that could be sacrificed if needed.

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"David" wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------- "Lew Hodgett" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------------ When you get book, find Fig: 5-42, "Geometric layout for any camber".
Provides a good gamber for your top. ----------------------------------------------------------- As I said, I'm strictly a Normite, but this IMHO, is strictly hand work. ----------------------------------------------------------- http://tinyurl.com/bwf5euz
This will show commercial long boards available from Jamestown Distributors.
I made mine using plywood and rubber cement to hold sandpaper strips.
A 4' x 36" rigid board should do a good job (1/2" plywood) of cleaning up surface.
----------------------------------------------------------------- Have fun.
Lew
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On Monday, November 26, 2012 9:05:12 PM UTC-8, David wrote:

I'm not sure I fully understand what the finished piece looks like but if it is a circular arc with a 20" radius, I would make a trammel for my router (mount router to one end of 6" wide board by 30" long). Then I would cut out this arc from MDF. Then use that as a pattern to build a jig. Affix the real piece to the jig and use a pattern bit (with a bearing follower) and shape the part on the router table.
If there is a bunch of material to remove then first trace the shape from the jig to the final part and precut the part on the band saw leaving just an 1/8" or so to trim with the pattern bit.
Does this make sense?
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On 11/27/2012 3:25 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

profile for the box sides is shown here: https://www.amazon.com/clouddrive/share?s=jV1_-IDETg4r_R18m5vLcs My plan is to make a single piece about 48" long for each box, then cut it into four pieces for the sides. Wood will be walnut, mahogany, or some other hardwood. What are the options for generating the profile shown in figure A? The only important dimension is the 4" width, everything else is approximate. Profile B would be acceptable as long as it can be made uniform over the 48" length. If someone out there has made a jig or fixture that will solve this problem and is willing to share the plan, it would be really appreciated. BTW, I have the usual complement of stationary, bench, and hand power tools.

is a circular arc with a 20" radius, I would make a trammel for my router (mount router to one end of 6" wide board by 30" long). Then I would cut out this arc from MDF. Then use that as a pattern to build a jig. Affix the real piece to the jig and use a pattern bit (with a bearing follower) and shape the part on the router table.

jig to the final part and precut the part on the band saw leaving just an 1/8" or so to trim with the pattern bit.

If I read it correctly, it appears that the sides of the box are 4" tall with 20" radius, and will be cut out of a piece 48" long, which must contain that profile before being sliced up for the sides ... pretty tough job for a router pattern bit. :)
But, I'm not sure if that is indeed the gig? ... if it is, and if had to do more than one, I would probably approach it thusly:
https://plus.google.com/photos/111355467778981859077/albums/5670803008599123937/5815642830465886418
Just talking out loud ....
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Your assumption is correct. I need to make a 4" x 48" piece with a convex surface face that approximates a 20" radius.
Although I didn't mention it, the approach you recommend is the first thing I tried: first saw an angle on convex face, then blend with a plane followed by sanding. It wasn't bad but I found it difficult maintain profile continuity over the length of the board, although the second or third piece would probably have become better with practice.
This afternoon I went to the shop and started building a router fixture inspired by the first commenter, Mike. However, rather than making a sled I'm working on a fixed fixed guide that the workpiece will pass under. If it works, I'll post the results tomorrow. If that doesn't work then I think the saw, plane, sand approach is the next best option.

https://plus.google.com/photos/111355467778981859077/albums/5670803008599123937/5815642830465886418
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