How to make painted OSB look halfway decent?

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On 4/11/2014 2:26 PM, Michael wrote:

I would think multiple layers of primer and sanded between each coat until you get a smooth surface and then add the paint.
It would probably be less expensive to get a smoother material to work with to begin with.
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Well, what we don't know is what the application may be.. We can't make a worth while suggestion as there is not enough information. I could picture the OSB already permanently in place and the possibility of not being able to fit a better material over it.
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Exactly so.
I recently needed some sheet goods for a project. I could buy ply for almost $40 per sheet or OSB for $11. I would have preferred ply but for my use it didn't much matter...skim coat the OSB with drywall mud, sand with a 1/2 sheet sander, prime and paint and it is fine. And I am $100+ richer.
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wrote:

Not bad looking but how do you get rid of the splinters?
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I think he said it's an outdoor wood drying "kiln" behind the house that he just wants to look decent.
I's just use board and batten lumber siding and let it weather grey.
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wrote:

I'm sure the tile in my bathroom is over just the plywood. There are a couple of loose tiles by the tub because of it. It'll all come up in a year or so when we redo the bathroom (and get rid of the plastic shower stall). I've had very good results with Hardiboard under tile. Raising the floor 3/4" has been the only problem, in past jobs.
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What steps? Fire resistant OSB? My current house has the I-beam floor joists. I see nothing protecting them at all. They do seem to be pretty susceptible to fire damage. Once the bottom rail is compromised, there isn't much left to hold up the floor.
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On 4/12/2014 10:07 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Most likely because you don't know what to look for; and/or the elements of fire resistant construction, draft stopping, dampers, etc. are hidden by wall coverings.
DAGS "Fire Resistance-Rated Construction", part of every framing/building inspection I've ever been through, both residential and commercial.
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"Swingman" wrote in message wrote: >>> And, IME, great pains are taken in modern building science and

There seems to be a gap between the ideal and the typical when it comes to this stuff... It is not unusual for me to see exposed 2x4 trusses or I-Joists in basements in newer homes I've been in... That includes a friend's 10,000 sq foot home that is about 6 years old... the majority of the basement is finished but the ceilings of the two mechanical rooms and the dead storage rooms (as compared to the pantry room, are not and the trusses are exposed. Arguably, the mechanical rooms with the furnaces, A/Cs, humidifiers, hot water heaters, heater and filter for the indoor lap pool, electrical panels, etc. should be the rooms with the most fire resistant construction...
It wasn't too long ago I read an article in either Fine Homebuilding or Journal of Light Construction about putting drywall on the sides of the 2x4 trusses to make them more fire resistant... this was a retrofitting process, not a construction phase process.
I don't think home owners appreciate the risks they face when the fire proofing detailing is left out... They simply don't know any better and surprisingly (to me anyway) even the home inspectors they rely upon are not noting the issues.
John
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On 4/13/2014 9:39 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

> I don't think home owners appreciate the risks they face when the > fire proofing detailing is left out..
By definition, five out of every ten folks who take a breath daily fall on the left side of the bell curve with regard to intelligence.
The times we live in ... those of us who were raised in a time when there was more value placed on being conscientious, than in being cunning, do what we can.
After that it becomes inevitable that it is every man for himself.
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On 4/13/2014 10:39 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

WHAT 10k sq foot... what does he do for a living, drug sales? My wife and I always kid about the McMansions around here, what the hell do they do....

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Jeff

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On 4/13/2014 10:39 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Wouldn't it be easier to spray a fire retardent spray on them, and offer more protection? You have all the plumbing and wiriring to work around and re-seal.
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Jeff

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wrote:

Yeah, but it's a matter of whether it goes down before or after we get out. ;-) The fire department's job is to protect the neighbor's house.
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On 4/12/14, 9:52 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

FWIW, Hardiboard comes in 1/4" thickness for use on floors.
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-MIKE-

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On Saturday, April 12, 2014 11:25:00 AM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:

Are you saying that 1/4 hardboard over plywood will work for tile?
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On 4/12/14, 10:11 AM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

If it's *really* a problem, then why don't codes require new home construction to have sprinkler systems installed? My friend's house came with them.
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On Friday, April 11, 2014 2:26:34 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

Update: A guy was selling 1/2 inch plywood for 9 bucks a sheet. No need for OSB for this project. Thanks.
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On 4/12/2014 2:53 PM, Michael wrote:

Damn that's a good price?? Where.. I need to make a blast cabinet for sand blasting. I wouldn't even use the OSB for that...
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Jeff

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On Saturday, April 12, 2014 2:11:28 PM UTC-5, woodchucker wrote:

Milwaukee, WI. He had only one more sheet to sell. Thank you, Craigslist.
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Make sure you are understanding what material we are talking about.
Hardboard is masonite type stuff, sometimes used as pegboard or as a base in making paneling. Don't use that.
Hardiboard is not anything, but it is close to describing the real product we are talking about.
The name of the stuff we are talking about is called hardibacker. Brand name. If you use that, then the answer is as follows.
Sure. That is exactly what it is designed for.
The key is to: Use a material that allows some movement in relation to the wood underneath it. Use a material that allows the mastic or grout to grab onto. Has a co-efficient of expansion similar to the stone or tile being installed on it. Does not deteriorate over time as it is exposed to the moisture always present when in contact with masonry products.
Meet those requirements, and you have a winner. Hardibacker or cement board, both qualify.
--
Jim in NC


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