How to make painted OSB look halfway decent?

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On 4/11/2014 11:19 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Ok, after checking out this stuff online... the SD stuff. what about the weight of someone walking on it, won't that crack the tile (obviously it would not sell if that were the case BUT), I think it is the subfloor giving that is causing the slate and grout lines to break.
So if you put down this SD over ply or OSB, wouldn't this still be an issue? They say that tiles can be done over ply or osb.. My wife picked out porcelain tiles..
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On 4/11/2014 10:31 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Actually, and IME, there is less chance of cracks with Ditra than with other methods. AAMOF, that is one of the advantages/selling points of the product.
I particularly like using it, as I stated, when there is an issue with floor heights from one room to the next.

I'm not one to run with the herd in building circles, and since I don't use common OSB flooring, I could not answer that from personal experience, but both builder acquaintances, and my tile crew, say they do it all the time.
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On 4/11/2014 11:39 PM, Swingman wrote:

The price for the SD is higher than the per tile price that she picked out... damn...
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Let me guess. A laver of 1/2" OSB applied to the joists or trusses, then 5 /8" MDF underlayment (sawdust board)?
That was a popular cheap way to do it back then. I never liked it, and never did it that way.
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On 4/11/2014 11:21 PM, Morgans wrote:

OSB on top of OSB. :-(
You tell me.. can you hear me screaming. Let me tell you about my foundation/sill. The sill plate is not on the foundation.. it wanders off of it. The brick on the outside is tell tale... it is behind the foundation..
We are the second owners... I didn't notice all the defects until I moved in...
Electrical... disaster.
This was a highly respected builder... I have no idea how they made it.. They are out of business now.. When everything fell apart the owner retired.
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On 4/11/14, 10:18 PM, Morgans wrote:

As I mentioned to Karl, they are all Oriented Strand Board. As he said, a Maserati is an automobile, too. So it a Buick. :-)
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Only in the same way that all chip type engineered lumber products do have the strands oriented. For technical definitions, OSB is the stuff people use for roof sheeting and wall sheeting that is not tongue and groove. The products like Advantec and Goldbond are engineered wood products for floor use and are tongue and groove. The chips and ratio of fine particles are greatly different, and so is the compression and the type of glue.
So no, Advantec and their ilk are not OSB.
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On 4/11/14, 10:29 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Are you thinking of metal wire trusses?
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-MIKE-

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"-MIKE-" wrote in message

No, the wooden floor trusses used in residential construction... plated 2x4 web (or I-joists for that matter) fail before dimension lumber joists in similar fire conditions.
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On 4/11/2014 10:42 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

And, IME, great pains are taken in modern building science and structural engineering/building codes to mitigate that as an issue to basically a moot point.
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On 4/11/14, 10:29 PM, Morgans wrote:

I know all that, but technically and in the industry, they are. Not the same animal as has been more that adequately explained in this thread, but OSB nonetheless.
I don't like to call it that, either, because it's so superior a product and I don't like to "insult" it. :-)
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On 4/11/14, 10:31 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I can't explain it better than their website, but that never stopped me before. :-)
Again, it must be repeated, mortar and tile should never be installed directly on any wood product. I don't care how "advanced' it is. If it expands and contracts at all, it's too much.
Cement-board is good but it doesn't really decouple and if your sub-floor/joists have much deflection the grout lines will still crack and you may get tiles separating from the mortar. The real purpose of cement board is to receive any moisture that penetrates the tile and mortor without soaking it up and swelling like a wood product will.
Ditra sheeting acts to decouple the subfloor from the mortar. Moisture cannot penetrate. More so, however, it also allows expansion/contraction above and below at different rates without any friction or contact. If there's too much deflection in the floor, Schluter suggests an engineered sub-floor before the Ditra. But, I've known tile contractors who use it on very unstable floors with great success and long term durability.
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Nope. Strand board is not plywood. Plywood is layers of veneers, usually with alternating layers at right angles to each other. Not a stack of chips oriented and glued and compressed.
It is all engineered wood products. OSB is manufactured to a totally different set of standards to the strands that are oriented in the engineered product known as Advantec. There are strands, but the lengths and widths of the chips are different, with Advantec strands being much longer and more narrow. They also have a much higher percentage of strands oriented in the long direction in Advantec compared to OSB.
Tell me this, as the final test. You go into a lumberyard. You ask for some OSB. You going to get OSB sheathing, or you getting Advantec?
I rest my case.
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On 4/11/2014 10:55 PM, Morgans wrote:

You would be resting on shaky ground as far as building codes go, which is where the rubber meets the road.
FACT: for building science and code purposes both are considered the same material, and the term "wood structural panel" is used as a singular description for either.
Sorry, Bubba ... but there is simply no room for your argument on that score.
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On 4/11/14, 10:31 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I'm not sure I was clear in this, but the Ditra is absolutely designed and purposed to go right over any sub-floor surface. If going down over a wood product (ply, OSB, engineered sub-floor), they recommend a latex additive to the mortar that will attach the Ditra to the sub-floor. That's the only stipulation.
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On 4/11/14, 10:42 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Makes sense, but I think the trade-off is worth it. A fire is a fire. Shit's going down. :-)
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"-MIKE-" wrote in message

In some areas fire departments will withdraw from, or not even enter, buildings with wood truss or I-joist construction as the risk of falling through the floor is greater. In those cases the losses tend to run higher. There was an extensive article on this some years ago in, as I recall, Journal of Light Construction (or maybe under it's previous name New England Builder). The article talked about roof structures also as the same problem exists there.
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On 4/12/2014 9:47 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Wood burns, steel twists and buckles, bricks and stones tumble and fall.
St Louis burned to the ground in 1849 and subsequently mandated that all structures be made of brick and stone ... they still had fires and the necessity for a FD.
Everything in life is a compromise to some degree, and it is rare to experience any benefit without some attendant risk.
Shit will happen, but most of us do the best we can to make housing both safe and affordable by assessing the risk versus benefit of those two components.
just my tuppence. ;)
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On 4/12/2014 10:47 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Yep, here in nj all commercial buildings must have a sign showing the type of roof construction. One fire dept lost many fireman (I think 5) when the roof collapsed. I'm not sure it would have made a difference for that fire, as they had to know in a flat roof that it was a truss roof..
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On 4/11/14, 10:43 PM, woodchucker wrote:

You have to take everything into consideration. How much is cement board and will it suffice for the floor it's going on? If it will and it's cheaper, great.
Schluter systems are a bit pricy, now, but getting more competitive every year. I equate it to engineered lumber. It was way too expensive at first, but the price of solid wood lumber is catching up quick.
By the way, the finished surface of any product usually is the cheapest part of a quality installation no? Look at paint.
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