how to: inlay a cutting brd in countertop

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I have some ideas on this, but I suspect there's better ones out there. So...
I have to deal with this kitchen countertop that had a hot pot set on it at least once. It burned thru the formica in spots (a fair number of spots, though not large ones) and I thought about inlaying a butcher block cutting board in the area of the burn. Routing out the space for the board and dropping it in.
Two questions:
1) Any other ideas on how to deal with this burned area (no, I don't want to replace the entire counter or reformica the entire counter), like a special touch up paint, etc.? Creativity is lacking on my part here as I just want to get the project out of my hair.
2) What's the best way to make a template or whatever to route a precise fit for the cutting board, stiff enough that clamping it to the counter only at the front (sliding the counter forward to be able to clamp at 4 corners vs. 2 isn't feasible) will preclude movement while routing. Again, I have ideas, but... Alternatively/additionally, any ideas for creative methods for dealing with the interface between the cutting board edge and countertop edge once the board is dropped in place (e.g. if I'm a wee bit off on the routing template...)?
Hope this makes sense (I'm not quite awake/aware yet, and probably won't be til tomorrow...).
Thanx REnata
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Renata wrote:

Use double sided tape to hold the template down. How about doing a ceramic tile insert? Use contrasting colors or even patterned/painted tiles.
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from my experience you want the insert to be removable. with this in mind we made both a ceramic tile insert and a cutting board insert for my mom so she can change it to fit what she is doing.
randy

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<slapping self upside the head> See - what a great idea by some of y'all - TILE! I think that'll be the easiest - about 6 or 9 of 'em.
THANX Renata
On Thu, 08 Jul 2004 15:46:36 GMT, "Saudade"
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<snip>
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How about making the template such that the outside frame is secured to a middle piece (think a sideways letter 'H', perhaps) which is then secured to the formica with a couple of screws in the area to be 'wasted'. Then pattern route.
Will the formica be cut all the way through? If so, think 'sink cutout', and support the board from underneath with cleats. A hole drilled, or plunge cut, then you have a place to clamp your template.
Or not. But there are a lot of ways to do this, and you've probably thought of three more since you wrote your note. From what I've seen of your work here, you've figured out lots of good answers...
Patriarch
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I tried to send a response directly to the author, but it bounced...
Here was my suggestion:
You might consider not having the cutting board surface flush with the counter top.
Router a socket/cut-out in the counter top, then make the cutting board slightly larger than the cut out. Router the edge of the cutting board with an overlap that sits on the counter top when dropped into the cut out, such that the cutting board is a quarter inch or so above the counter. Do not glue the cutting board down.
The overlap would prevent food, etc. from getting into the interface. In addition, the cutting board could be removed from its socket for more vigorous cleaning (or replacement) if/when required.
"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

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I read some of the other responses, and had this thought: Why not just sit the cutting board/butcher block ON the laminate surface, maybe on soft plastic feet? Sort of a wooden trivet. Covers the discolored area, avoids the water/bacteria sealing problem, makes cleanup easier, and gets you on to a project for which you have some enthusiasm?
You could be done in 30 minutes! ;-)
Patriarch
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I was was thinking exactly what Sid said (below) .
However, I would add that you would have to seal with some sort of finish the raw edges of the cutout because spills would inevitably dribble into there.

with
such
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bacteria trap. water intrusion into the subbase, causing swelling. a bad idea all around.
you'd do better to cut a hole larger than the board, seal the sides WELL, and support from below using sink clips.

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If you do an inlay, you can seal the space btw the board and the Formica with a color caulk - depending on the style/color of your Formica. Bath/kitchen fixture companies make caulks to match some of their fixture colors -- Kohler is one, IIRC.
If you do the overalp lip and drop-in design, as others have suggested, (much easier as you can do a cutout with a saber saw - like doing a sink) you might put closed-cell weather seal under the lip -- that is what some appliance companies do for drop-in appliances. Also, you do not say how thick the cutting board will be and if you want it flush. If you like the drop-in idea, and were planning on a 1.5" cutting board, you could instead try a 3/4" board, round over the edges, and then simply attach it to the counter top with screws from underneath. If you do that, consider using some kind of sealer at the edges, underneath, whether the plumber putty stuff used for sinks or clear & food safe caulk.
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Cut a hole out of the counter top using a jig saw, much like you cut out a sink opening. Trace around the cutting board and then trace inside that line about a 1/4" inch. Cut that out with a jig saw. For the cutting board, assuming it's 3/4" thick, run all the edges of the cutting board through a jointer taking 3/8" x 3/8" out of a corner. Drop in the cutting board into the counter top, should fit in there just right.
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snipped-for-privacy@myrealbox.com says...

Carpet tape will hold a template nicely
--
MikeG
Heirloom Woods
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calmly ranted:

Just be careful when removing it or -it- may be stuck better (than the formica is to the substrate) and you'll lift the formica, perhaps in pieces.
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wrote:

Here's what worked for me and the concept will work for you. I needed to cut a perfect hole in my router table top, which is covered in Formica. I built a jig from hardwood wood strips 2" wide, 1/2" thick. I fitted my router with a straight-cutting bit and a collar. Knowing the (small) distance between the cutting edge and collar is important. Lay out the strips such that the router will ride on the inside of the rectangle and half-lap the corners of the strips. Making the jig such that the corners cross rather than make a corner will make the jig stronger and provide an area for clamping. You want the jig to be smooth with no steps at the joints. Make a test run on some scrap ply to see if the cutting board fits !!! It might be easier to make the hole slightly smaller then trim the cutting board to fit. Holding the jig tight to the counter is important. As you stated, you can clamp the jig to the counter edge, but on the sides and back use double-sided carpet tape (To remove the tape dampen with kerosene and scrap with a credit card.) Take several passes around the template, cutting a max 1/4" with each pass.
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Renata wrote:

Just a dumb notion here, but have you considered inlaying a granite tile or three instead of the butcher block? If a hot pot got set there once then one will again, and granite will take that a lot better than butcher block.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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calmly ranted:

There is? </English Teacher mode>

How about gluin' & screwin' (from the bottom) a cutting board on top of the counter with a bead of clear sillycone 'round 'er?
Glue down a thin cork hotpad area instead of a cutting board?

Since you're cutting out the center, screw a template onto the bad portion of the counter, then rout around it with a pattern bit. Hotglue some plates on the bottom to hold the cutout if you want to go all the way through.

Cut another bit (1/4"?) of contrasting wood inlay to go around it. That'll only work once, and the "bullseye" look would begin at the second strip. ;)

I've never understood that. I'm about 95% awake by the time my feet hit the floor, and mornings are my best time. (My body hasn't had time to get tired yet and after the ten minutes of arthritic creakiness, I'm pretty much good to go.)
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Hey! I 'tole' you I wuz half asleep. Language skills were obviously still in bed.
My early start to get back to MD got waylaid by the amount of last minute crap I had to take care of in PA. Had to drive thru a nasty storm, got in at 1AM, woke up at 5AM. Coffee NOT ready at work. Brain just wasn't too interested in waking up, in spite of my insistence to the contrary. Normally there's about a one hour delay, but mornings are the best for me too.
The clear,crisp air (a rarity for Washington in summer) this morn made ever so hard to drag myself in to work... Hmm, maybe I'll sneak out early ;-)
Renata
On Thu, 08 Jul 2004 18:49:18 -0700, Larry Jaques

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Renata,
You can buy a pre-made board complete with a mounting flange at most home centers.
They come with a template similar to a sink. And flange the same way.
Glass (corningware type)boards are also available if you are concerned about bacteria buildup etc.
Rob
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Thank you all for some great ideas. Project being what it is, I think I'm gonna go with tile (ceramic or granite), since that'll be simplest. But, I'm gonna save some of the suggestions for future use.
Thanx! Renata
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Will you just apply the tile to the surface or will you try to recess it some? I think this is a very cool idea and think that I may try something similar in our kitchen.
I'd love to see what you come up with.
SteveP.

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