How to heat a 9 x 16 uninsulated shed? Suggestions sought.

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snipped-for-privacy@vt.edu wrote:

...
Problem is, of course, there's really no source of pure carbon as a fuel. Eastern coals have roughly 5% or so H in an ultimate analysis plus that in the 2-3% moisture; western coals are somewhat higher. H normally doesn't show up in the analyses as generally one sees the proximate analysis, not an ultimate so the moisture content is all that's reported on that basis (but the elemental H is additional to H20 in an ultimate analysis so it's not a double-accounting).
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dpb wrote:

Coke and charcoal come pretty close, with up to 95 percent carbon content.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Don't have an ultimate analysis handy, but 100 - 95 is pretty close to 5 :)
Not too many use either for space heating, though, which was the general subject. Anyway, was just noting there's H pretty much everywhere, even in nonhydrogenous fuels unless special care made to remove it.
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Coke?
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Stuart Winsor

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Stuart wrote:

For space heating?
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It is a source of almost pure Carbon for use as a fuel :-)
Actually, one of my daughters is a blacksmith and uses Coke for her forge - place can get pretty warm.
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Stuart Winsor

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Stuart wrote:

Secondary effect :)
It's probably the most common use for coke, of course...good friend has been plant engineer for one or more foundries for years. One of his horror stories is the new furnace dedication of a Japanese owned facility -- the religious leader picked up a big handful of sea salt and before John could stop him, having no idea what was coming, tossed it in the hot vessel! Needless to say, the Cl and other nasties caused so much contamination in what was to be a very specialized high-purity stainless forge they had to completely gut the lining and redo it -- at the cost of something like $10M.
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Yes I know, when they're not using the forge they have a wood burning stove to keep warm :-)
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Stuart Winsor

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dpb wrote:

Usually overkill for the purpose. Charcoal on the other hand has at various times and in various places been plentiful--it's a byproduct of pine-tar extraction for example, which led to it being something of a glut on the market in Scandinavia at one time. After a while they ran out of pine trees though . . .
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dpb wrote:

Snort enough of it and you won't care how cold it is? ;-)
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Jack Novak
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The price I paid for the infrared propane heater was $49. http://www.heatershop.com/propane_infrared_heaters.html
Thanks for all for the good advice and for alerting me to the moisture problem. I think I'll start by leaving the double doors open for an hour or two after closing down work.
I haven't taken a close look at it yet, but the easiest way to insulate for me will be to use the firm pink foam stuff with the shiny silver backing from Home Depot.
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On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 18:03:11 -0800 (PST), KIMOSABE

Heated an 8 x 16 shed w/ no insulation through an extremely cold upstate NY winter a while back with one of those single burner round ones. One thing that really helped was a small fan behind and above the heater to help circulate the warm air it produces. Kept the kids toasty after school while I rebuilt a house from the ground up. Although water vapor is a byproduct of almost all combustion, I never noticed a problem with it. Good luck bud
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-MIKE- wrote:

Cellulose C6 H10 O5
Lignin is not clearly defined chemically but it also contains a great deal of hydrogen.
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KIMOSABE wrote:

For a rough estimate of how much heater you need you might want to run the calculator at http://www.heater-store.com/heater_calculator_info.htm . Note that with good insulation you need a _lot_ less heat.
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On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 16:25:14 -0500, "J. Clarke"

Evan a little bit of insulation makes a big difference ;-)
I had an outside shop (electronics in those days, not woodwoorking) that was 8x10 with insulated walls and ceiling and very little leakage. I used a 1250 watt electric heater (with a wall thermostat) and was comfortable when the outside temperature was 30 degrees (a little better than the calculator indicates).
John
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Here's another approach if you have a South Wall exposed: http://www.instructables.com/id/Solar-Heater /
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Hi,
I've got about what you do, 12' x 24' metal storage building, with an overhead door, two windows, a hand door, and lots of leaks. And I live in Minnesota, where it does get cold.
I haven't found a way to insulate the shed without building a wall inside the existing walls, which looks like more $$ and time than I want to put in.
So, on the advice from a friend I bought 4 infra red heat lamps (think chicken brooder heating) with porcelain sockets. I put two at the bench and two at the lathe, and I use a small radiant propane heater (about 14000 butu) on top of a 20# propane cylinder (called a fish house heater, before fish houses got to be traveling living rooms) to put heat where I need it.
And I invested in a pair of flannel lined jeans ($50) and insulated shoes from LL Bean ($70) and a stocking cap. Add a chore jacket, a sweatshirt and gloves, and I can be reasonably comfortable working out there in 25 degree weather (ambient is about 40 inside) if the sun is shining, and 30 degree weather if not. Oh, I found some of those interlocking rubber mats for kids to play on and put them on the floor where I usually stand ($20). Obviously I am happier working with tools with wooden handles when it's cold.
Any gluing or finishing or working with water ends up being done in my attached garage which stays at about 50 degrees.
Shirt sleeves? No, but for a minimum of effort and fuss I have a reasonable heating system so that I only have to concede 2 months a year to winter. Fair compromise.
I thought about a wood stove, but it bothered me to have something that hot in the way, and to bank up the fire and leave it unattended at the end of the day.
Old Guy

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*snip*
Just a thought... Have you looked in to a spray foam insulation? It has to be applied professionally, and will take a little space, but it's better than building 2x4 stud walls so you can install bat insulation.
Puckdropper
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Have you seen the silver backed rolls of insulation that are always against metal roofs in big corrugated steel buildings? I can't remember where, but I saw that stuff being installed once with built in adhesive. They pealed off a backing and stuck it up, straight on the roofing. The adhesive was super-duty, like that rubber self-sealing window flashing. It would stick to anything and everything, and would not come loose.
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