how to glue up to make a wooden plane

I'm going to try to make a wooden plane, probably a jack/fore plane.
Since I won't be able to get a single piece of stock that will be big enough, I plan on gluing up from thinner pieces. My question is, how should the gluing be oriented?
In bad ascii art (looking end-on)
| | | | | | | | | | IE - the glue joints are vertical
or
------- ------- ------- ------- IE the glue joints are horizontal
I lean towards the vertical glue lines, as the wood movement would be parallel to the blade. If I went horizontal, the space for the blade would expand/contract. Maybe the difference is small enough such that it doesn't matter.
But, I thought I'd ask here for any advice before starting.
Thanks, Steve
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Here's a thread on another forum that addresses your question, and others that you will have. http://www.unpluggedshop.com/blogs/luke-townsley/advice-making-wooden-planes
R
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I love using my wooden planes. In fact I don't understand how the metal ones ever caught on. I have never made them because the old ones (and some new ones too) are so easy to find, cheap to buy, pleasing to use, fun to clean up and tune, so I can't give you any good advice, except perhaps to copy slavishly an old pattern - no point trying to be clever here. You know how if you use a tool a lot you become intensely aware of the efficiency of that tool - the old patterns are much closer to perfect than you or I could ever think out or design already.
But really I just wanted to wish you well in your endeavour. It could be really rewarding.
Tim W
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Have you ever used an infill plane? They're about the best combination of features. The extra weight is a plus - like the extra mass on a jointer or TS - it cuts down on chatter and smooths out the stroke.
R
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wrote:

Have you ever used an infill plane? They're about the best combination of features. The extra weight is a plus - like the extra mass on a jointer or TS - it cuts down on chatter and smooths out the stroke. ---------------
I haven't. In fact I had to Google to find out what they are. Interesting.
Tim w
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Don't worry about wood movement, they all move, even the best Japanese planes. Takes but a second to set the iron, which is what makes a woodie so great. Irons on a 100 year old Bailey should set as fast.
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Actually I do have some advice after all, although you will know this by now if you have looked at some hand made planes on the net.
Traditionally the plane body is a single block of wood and you have to cut the throat through from top to bottom like a difficult angled mortice. You can cheat by forming the throat when you glue up the plane body out of separate oieces. Not really authentic, but with modern glues perfectly adequate.
Tim W
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On Wed, 27 Apr 2011 14:34:27 -0700 (PDT), Steve Anthony

http://www.diynetwork.com/videos/european-hand-plane/39703.html
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says...

I like his overall design.
I'd either put a couple of pins through the body or use either weldwood plastic resin glue or hide glue to glue it up. Titebond creeps under continuous force and the wedge provides continuous force. Neither Weldwood plastic resin nor hide glue will creep--there's a time for old school or older school. Dunno if it's a problem with a plane or not-- my wooden planes are all older than I am and the bodies are one-piece-- but I'd rather belt-and-suspenders it from the start.
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Mind your thumbs on the router table. That looked a *bit* close not to use a push block.
Krenov design. No handles, and works all the better for it. These are a bit finer finished. Krenov checkered or simply left the top surfaces rough from the bandsaw to enhance grip. The work they performed was more important. Krenov also shaped the bottoms of his planes to preform specific tasks, such as coopering.
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Steve Anthony wrote the following:

Well, it worked for the WWII British Mosquito. <insert Groan here>
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Did you get started Steve? I am tempted to start one myself now. I was thinking about a German pattern rather than an English one, you know with the handle at the front and the blade in the middle? They are good to use.
Tim W
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