How to get that very dark stain look?

I apologize if I'm posting this in the wrong forum, but I do not know where else to turn. I recently purchase a piece of furniture that I would like to stain. I would really like for it to have a very dark brown appearance. Not nearly black, but very dark deep brown. I purchased a dark mahogony stain but when I applied it to a test area, it wasn't nearly dark enough. Someone suggested that I apply the stain and not to wipe it. That if I leave the stain on it will leave a much darker paint-like effect. Is this an acceptable method of applying stain?
Here is an example photo of the color/look I'd like to achieve.
http://a1412.g.akamai.net/7/1412/8802/0001/image2.styleinamerica.com/weecimgs/images/products/200435/0003/img14l.jpg
I don't mind if it comes out slightly lighter. I'd just like to get close to this look.
Thanks in advance and once again, sorry if I'm posting in the wrong forum.
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There are probably better ways, but I did it with a brown dye followed by dark mahogany stain.
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toller wrote:

My experience has yielded much more uniform and predictable results with aniline dye. This dyes the wood and the color is a function of the dye rather than the soaking time of the stain so seems more reliable than stain and is less tempermental about how long you leave it on. I've only used water based aniline dye which is very convenient to mix to the right shade but does require that you pre-wet, dry, and sand the raw wood a couple of times to get the grain so it won't require sanding after the dye is applied. Sanding will sand off the dyed wood and you will lose color richness. Light steel wool is all you should need.
TWS
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Not if waterbased will be topcoat. Or synthetic wool.

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Joey wrote: snip-> when I applied it to a test area, it wasn't nearly dark

Yes, you can leave it on without wiping, but it'll take quite awhile to dry. I did this over lightly shellacked pine (helps avoid blotchiness), and it took about a week plus to dry enough so I could topcoat. And this is in Arizona! Gluck! Tom Work at your leisure!
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On 2 Sep 2004 15:43:08 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@dreamtraveler.net (J) wrote:

Try the "Ebony" shade of this:
<http://www.garrettwade.com/jump.jsp?itemType=PRODUCT&iProductID 1718>
Practice on scrap, or the bottom of the table.
Barry
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For a dark color with a more even grain color, I use dye. One that works well for me is TransTint. Use it at full strength on a test piece and dilute if it is too dark.
Check out http://www.homesteadfinishing.com/htdocs/TransTint.htm
Preston

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<extraneous stuff trimmed>

The October issue of Woodworker's Journal came in today's mail. It so happens that Michael Dresdner wrote a nice long article on just such a topic.
Who says there's never anything good in the magazines?
Patriarch
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Hey guys, Thanks for all your input! I really appreciate it. I think I have a really good starting point now.
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If you haven't tried anything yet, Sutherland welles makes a concentrated line of stains that you can mix to pretty much make whatever color you want. expensive stuff but if nothing else works it might be worth a shot for you.
good luck
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A little hard to tell from a picture, but something like Bartley's Jet Mahogany might work for you.
Wayne

http://a1412.g.akamai.net/7/1412/8802/0001/image2.styleinamerica.com/weecimgs/images/products/200435/0003/img14l.jpg
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"Joey" I'll give you the answer, but a lot of the 'purists' on this forum will really scream.
"Burma Teak" by MinWax.
It's one of their 'PolyShield' products. {Pretty sure - a can is in the 'paint locker' so I'll try to do this from memory.} It combines a stain with a Poly finish. The first time I used it - years ago - I followed the directions on the can. Painted it on and let it dry. Came out like our dining room table - deep, dark, Duncan Phyfe mahogany.
I've experimented with different techniques for applying the stuff. Including using it just like a 'regular' stain - wipe on, wipe off. Like it a lot. However, If you want that DEEP, DARK red-brown color, all you need is a foam brush, a light touch, and a bit of patience. Over it, I would recommend several coats of a water-based clear Poly. This will give a good, HARD finish that will protect the stained surface.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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I'll add that it's all about the look _you_ want!
I've done furniture from gorgeous mahogany, with mostly traditional methods (only a few power tools <G>), and a simple wiped on, hand rubbed oil finish. Purists would love it.
I've also done pieces with plywood, biscuits, and 49 gajillion coats of sprayed on lacquer, with all kinds of stains dyes and toners in between. Purists would disparage it to they day they drop.
The end users are thrilled with both examples.
Spray paint it pink if you want. <G>
Don't forget to practice on scrap, or the bottom of the piece, if it's all you've got.
Barry
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