How to get rid of router lines??


Whenever I use a round-over bit on my router I end up with a small edge where the roundover bit ends. I have tried to adjust the router height so that you can't see this and even though I can get it close it's always there. I am cutting dozens and dozens of pieces and end up having to sand each of them after using the router.........a major hassle!
Does anyone have any suggestions for me?
Thank you!
II
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Typically I have had this problem also, but I find the amount of sanding minimal. You might find roundover bit that would reduce this to almost a nonexistant problem, but with a good bit, I would think the amount of effort to clean up this line not to be a concern. I would be interested in other woodworker's reaction to this this perceived problem.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Is the bearing just ever so slightly undersized? To find out set the fence proud of the bearing in a router table and see if the problem goes away with careful set up of the height.
Dave
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Perhaps your workpiece is not as flat as you might think it is. IOW both opposite faces must be in the same plane.
If sanding and scraping ain't your game then try a dish bit, basically a wide, planing router bit.
J.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Will a dish bit do the same thing as a roundover bit? Sorry John I am a complete novice! I build fishing lures and wouldn't mind the sanding but when you have literally hundreds to work with it becomes very tiring.
I have tried adjusting the height dave but can't ever seem to get it to go away "completely". I am using hard maple so the sanding part is "hard"!
I have tried a flat file to sand them, sandpaper, a drum sander on my drill press, a belt sander, they all work but the amount of time needed to correct the problem is considerable and it really wears me down after doing 30 of them.
II
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

that's why I think your bearing MIGHT be undersize. see my earlier post for determining that. dave
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I think he was referrring to a "foldover" where the routing ends, not a lip along the length of the rout? It would deserve some further explanation of the problem.
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After seeing others' responses I think perhaps I misunderstood your original question. Sorry. The only other suggestion I might make then would be that perhaps a slightly thinner workpiece might help. If you can post a photo or drawing of the problem you'd likely get definitive answers quickly.
J.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I agree with Dave. The bearing is slightly narrow or (I have had two roundover bits like this) the cove of the bit is less then 90 degrees. They both went in the garbage. I stick to higher-end router bits now.
Wayne
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snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca wrote:

what brand was it, Wayne?
dave
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Is your roundover bit is actually that and not a bead bit? If so, your bearing is too small. You can fix that by using a fence. If the "edge" is on the side of the board rather than the edge your depth setting is too deep.
The other possibility is that you are trying to round over *both* edges to form a half round. If that is the case, you'll get a slightly asymetrical shape with the "edge" you refer to. That is because when you do the second edge the bearing is riding on an area that was cut when you did the first edge - it is inset slightly. The easy cure is to use a fence. A less easy one is to add a piece of fiberboard or such on top and use a top bearing bit running on it.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
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wrote:

If the problem is along the length of the route, and not the end, as I had assumed, then this is the best explanation, I think.
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I get this all the time. You can't rely on eyeballing the bit height. Simply retract the bit, bit by bit (!?) until the edge disappears.
Remember, if you're not practicing on scrap, you're practicing on your project. :-)
--
Vince Heuring To email, remove the Vince.

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On 30 Dec 2005 18:31:12 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

1. Your bit might not be sharp ..you ARE routing hard maple! Also, there are good bits and cheap bits.
2. Some might not agree, but I have occasionally [carefully!] started from the end, routing in the backward direction for a VERY short distance, then going to the beginning and routing upto that point.
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I had this problem also. I always got this router edge when I attempted to round over a corner.
I went to rocklers or maybe it was woodcraft and told them the problem I was having. It's been a while but what I had been sold before was a beading bit not a round over bit. When I got a round over bit the edge went away.
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.3
IF you are talking about the top of the bit at the widest part of the cut, you need to raise the bit so that it does not cut as deep. Yes the round over will not be complete but minor sanding corrects that. That sanding is much easier than having to take out a ridge caused by cutting too deep.
If you are talking about the round over near the bottom at the bearing, get a new and or better bit.
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If the 'edge' is at the bearing end of the roundover then the bearing is slightly undersized.
If it is at the other end the depth adjustment is wrong. Or I suppose the bit might be incorrectly ground.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Yes. Sounds to me that the bearing has worn and is no longer terminating at the same edge as the cutter. IOW.. the bearing isn't keeping the cutting radius away from your work-piece adequately. Put a little filament tape over the bearing (increasing its diameter) and test at slow speed if you can. The worse thing that will happen that the piece of tape will fly off, but by that time, you'll have confirmed my suspicions.
Sometimes there is a little flange washer between the bearing and the cutter creating a line.
The other possibility, already mentioned by other crew members, is that you're riding the bearing on a surface which has already been rounded over, allowing the cutter to go too deep.
BTW.. does that line show up when rounding over a large piece of wood? Like a piece of 2 x 2?
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A great many of the responders didn't seem to not have read the orriginal post. He said that he had reduced the problem by adjusting the HEIGHT of the bit. It would appear that the problem is not on the side. The bearing would not have anything to do with it. The solution is simple. If it is cutting to deep, back it off.
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