How to get G1023SL into basement

Hello, all,
I know, I know... wasn't a similar question asked recently? Well, only sort of. I have some questions specific to this saw. Also, I already did a google search, and I've checked the library. :)
Here is my dilemma: SWMBO and I are buying a house this month, and I am allowed to have a shop in the basement. After calling Grizzly, they offer curb-side drop-off, so as long as I can get them to bring the saw in a truck with a tailgate that lowers, shouldn't be a problem. Also, our driveway slopes upward toward the house, and is about 200ft long. Also not a problem, provided I have a hand truck. Now comes the trouble. Access to the basement is via a bulkhead in the rear of the house, but to get to the rear of the house, you need to step over a 2ft retaining wall.
I understand the saw comes in 2 boxes: one being about 100 lbs, and the other being about 360 lbs. I am not built like Arnold Schwarzeneggar, and this is likely to be a 1 to 2-man job. My question is this: Anyone have experience taking this particular saw apart and putting it back together again? How difficult would it be, given I do not have (nor do I wish to purchase) _expensive_ calibration equipment? Will I need specialized tools? Could I disassemble it using an ordinary screwdirver/socket wrench set? Is the top difficult to make square again once it is removed? How heavy is the top of this thing, anyway? After taking it apart, would it be reasonably safe for a one person to bring it down a bulkhead? Are there any other forseeable problems with my plan?
Any input you could give would be appreciated. Also, I am a newbie, so please be gentle. :)
Thanks, Barry K.
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: Hello, all, : : I know, I know... wasn't a similar question asked recently? Well, only sort : of. I have some questions specific to this saw. Also, I already did a : google search, and I've checked the library. :) : : Here is my dilemma: SWMBO and I are buying a house this month, and I am : allowed to have a shop in the basement. After calling Grizzly, they offer : curb-side drop-off, so as long as I can get them to bring the saw in a truck : with a tailgate that lowers, shouldn't be a problem. Also, our driveway : slopes upward toward the house, and is about 200ft long. Also not a : problem, provided I have a hand truck. Now comes the trouble. Access to : the basement is via a bulkhead in the rear of the house, but to get to the : rear of the house, you need to step over a 2ft retaining wall. : : I understand the saw comes in 2 boxes: one being about 100 lbs, and the : other being about 360 lbs. I am not built like Arnold Schwarzeneggar, and : this is likely to be a 1 to 2-man job. My question is this: : Anyone have experience taking this particular saw apart and putting it : back together again? : How difficult would it be, given I do not have (nor do I wish to : purchase) _expensive_ calibration equipment? : Will I need specialized tools? Could I disassemble it using an ordinary : screwdirver/socket wrench set? : Is the top difficult to make square again once it is removed? : How heavy is the top of this thing, anyway? : After taking it apart, would it be reasonably safe for a one person to : bring it down a bulkhead? : Are there any other forseeable problems with my plan? : : Any input you could give would be appreciated. Also, I am a newbie, so : please be gentle. :) : : Thanks, : Barry K. : :
I cannot help but ask, what is a bulkhead in a house ? As far as manpower, it takes 2. Don't try to muscle the piece parts even if they are relatively light. One drop and all bets are off.
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Whoops, sorry. A bulkhead is a set of 2 slanted metal doors that lead directly from the outside into the basement, with wooden steps. Must be one of those New-Englandy phrases.
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Yes, it is. Never hear it here in the west. I'm originally from Maine (now living in Seattle) so new immediately what you meant.
Must be one of those

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A bulkhead in a house is a set of concrete or wooden steps that leads to the basement. The top is covered with a pair of wooden doors set at an angle to the house (and it leaks) or a new Bilco unit that doesn't leak.
http://www.bobvila.com/images/HowTo/IHouse/Structural/basement_door01.jpg
http://icoho.org/images/99-07-30/shirl_bulkhead_stair.jpg
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I did a Jet Cab saw a while ago... but I went UP stairs rather than down. I assume that the griz product comes about the same as the jet... fence is separate, cast wings are separate extension table is separate. The number of boxes is not really what you care about because you will likely unpack the beast outside and bring in the *pieces*.
I *ONLY* extra disassembly that I did was take off the motor. I'm guessing, but in my case it brought the main cabinet just below 200lbs. At that point, it was a very doable 2-man job (I'm not a big guy either).
FWIW taking the motor out was easy, but it took me about an hour to get it back in, because it weighs something like 80 lbs and needs to be installed through the cabinet door w/ me on my back and I only had my set of hands. YMMV.
-Steve

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II purchased a jointer a few years back and was also worried how to get it into our basement. I had to go up two steps, across a tile floor and then down a flight of steps with a landing half way down and 180 turn then another set of steps. I finally decided to rent a refrigerator dolly, and found the whole process to be much easier than I expected it to be. With the dolly on its back, the driver hung the jointer box off of the back of the truck. He lowered and I helped from the bottom. It wasn't that bad at all. I got it in the basement by my self with some guidance from one of my teen-age sons.
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On 3 Oct 2003 12:17:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@vmtw.com (vmtw) wrote:

How large a jointer are we talking about here?
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Build an A frame over bulkhead with a hoist to raise and lower saw down. Place 2x4's on stairs face down tack carpet on 2x4's to allow easire sliding and preventing scratches. When bottom of cabinet begins to reach 2x4's slide down to bottom of basement floor.

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The two boxes are the fence (you can easily handle this or go ahead and break it open and take out the parts) and the saw.
The cast iron wings are packed on the top of the box. You can pull them out easily to reduce the weight. If you are going to go beyond that you will have to start disassembling. Removing the top will be fairly simple (4 bolts) and will reduce the weight by maybe 65 lbs or so - I'm guessing that based on the weight of the wings, not because I actually removed it. IF you note and mark any shims which are in place when you remove it, it should be simple to reinstall and adjust it without any expensive equipment. The manual goes through the process in detail and you probably will be doing it anyway even if you don't remove the top. Going further than that will require more disassembing than I think you want to do (removing motor and/or trunions)
I think you are best off by seeing if you can get a couple more people to help you lift it over your retaining wall.
Note also that the saw comes on a pallet so a dolly rather than a hand truck might be in order.

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Barry, I rolled my G1023 down a set of ramps off my pickup and into my garage. I took it off the pallet and took the wings out of the box first. If it were me, I would have no qualms about taking off the top and removing the motor if need be. After all, you are only doing it once and when you get it all put back together and adjusted you will know a lot more about the construction of your saw. You will also be more confident that it is properly adjusted.
montyhp

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news.verizon.net wrote:

You'll be notified that it's coming, and then you'll have to get in touch with the nearest branch of whatever carrier is delivering the thing in order to schedule the residential delivery.
When you do, be sure to ask for a truck with a lift gate.
I've received a couple of residential motor freight deliveries, and I don't think either truck had a lift gate. I'm sure the last one didn't. We had to break down the pallet and take it off a piece at a time. Fortunately, it wasn't a machine.
I'm normally on the other side, as a truck driver. Our trucks don't have lift gates period, but we're not a common carrier, and we never do residential, so you don't have to worry about *us*. Most of the major LTL carriers do have trucks that sport lift gates, but I wouldn't expect that they all do. It's *definitely* in your best interest to make absolutely sure before the truck gets dispatched, unless you have a lot of friends, and a lot of beer on hand.
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I've unloaded a couple of big crates off semis by sliding them off the back onto a pickup truck with a set of ramps. That way the height is almost cut in half. Then you have to go down the ramp off the pickup again. If you don't have a truck, maybe you can borrow one. Another option would be to borrow a truck and pick the shipment up at the terminal, and they could load it using a forlift. Just my 2 cents.
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ToolMiser wrote:

Bad plan if you're liable for damage done to the truck. :)
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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