How to get burn-free cuts?

Page 1 of 2  
I kept on getting burn marks on my Delta Unisaw when cutting Maple. I have a tune-up, align the blade and table slot to less than 0.002". (more like 0.001" with a dial gauge). I also replaced the left side of the board on the Biesemeyer fence and aligned to the blade. I tested it using Delta's saw blade and Forrest WWll (thin Kerf) blade. I am still getting burn marks (less on the WWll blade) after the tune-up. Will it help if I increase the clearance between the fence and the blade by as much as 0.030" on the out feed side of the blade as suggest by a woodworking magazine? What other advice do you have?
Thanks ..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WD wrote:

Maple, being high in sugar content, has a tendency to burn easily. Increasing the toe out most likely cause the burn to be on the waste side (the side opposite the fence) of the cut.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I saw Norm cut maple and get a burn mark so don't feel so bad. I know I felt better. Phil Brown
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I hear you. I struggle with the same problem.
Keep you feed rate up... that wil help alot.
-Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would suggest using a full kerf blade, thin kerf blades can and do flex ahd could be rubbing the wood.
Will it help if I increase the clearance between the fence

If every thing is correctly set up NO moving the fence out at the back only creates problems some where else. You want your fence to be dead parallel to the blade. Moving the fence out only hides problems and leaves the waste side of the cut with a rough edge which is not a good thin if you plan on using the waste side.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Regardless of the saw and blade it is difficult to not burn Maple, A fast feed rate helps.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

fast
Never thought about it before, but it makes me wonder if there's anything similar to TopCote except it's sprayed on the blade to permit easier cutting resulting in a faster feed rate? Akin to soaping the blade so to speak.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Actually there is a coating for bits and blades. Empire makes it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

First let me thank everyone who replied. I can see It not only my problems. Previously, I use Oldham Signature Series combination saw blades. I encounter little or no burn. My past experienced cleaning the saw blades with a pink gum cleaning solution (sold by Woodcraft) will also remove the Teflon coating. I have since sold my old Crapmans table saw and with it, I generously gave all my Oldham blades. Today I cannot find Oldham Signature Series combination saw blades. Few weeks ago I did not buy one that was available in Ebay. It was a used and without the stabilizer. Anyone where I can buy an Oldham Signature Series saw blades? Thanks again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WD wrote:

See:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Oldham+Signature+Series+saw+blades&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&oq
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's not just the average feed rate, but make sure you keep the board moving. When feeding a long board, I think the slow downs when changing hands creates burns. Try to get a hand over hand motion to keep the board always moving. I think feather boards help too because the keep the board from moving as you change hands, and thus slightly change the point on the board where you are applying force.
I also second the call for a 24T rip blade. I have a thin kerf Freud rip blade and it is 100x better than my WWII when ripping. The perfect combo blade is still a myth.
Mitch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

A good 20T rip blade can also help.
I love my WWII's, but sometimes, the tooth count is simply not right for a specific job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keep the blade free of pitch and gum. I also agree with a slight extra angle on the outfeed side of the fence (probably less than the .030" suggested, it's actually just some amount you can visually detect: Heck, the Biesemeyer fences are not even that consistently accurate for high-volume use [insert argument here]), but it will also depend on which side of the board is going to warp toward the blade when cut and the grain releases. Kind of a crapshoot. We use a lot of maple in our shop and have to deal with this. No complete answer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote in message

Bingo!
LOL ... even David J Marks has his share of burn with maple. With maple, it's the 5 lb gorilla in the room nobody mentions. :)
Damn it's cold up here in Austin ... way too far North for this coonass!
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, right now it's -15C with a wind chill of -24C in Toronto.
That's -5F and minus 11F with the wind chill for you other people. It's supposed to be worse tomorrow.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Upscale wrote:

It is supposed to be 82 degrees F (23 C) here is So Cal tomorrow. It was 86 F today. This week, it has been hot for January even by So Cal standards.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Upscale wrote:

I flew from Hartford to Harrisburg, PA and back in a small, twin-engined aircraft Friday. Even with the gasoline powered Janitrol heater cranked, flannel lined jeans, and three shirts, I froze @ only 5000 feet.
Normally, we can do burgers on the heater grate!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I was once in a mode where I was creating lots of buthcer block tops. This meant ripping hundreds of bf of 4/4 5/4/ and 6/4 hard maple into l 1/2 to 2 1/2" strips. When the shop upgraded the burned out 3hp in the unisaw to a 5hp I rarely saw burn after that unless I had stressed wood that was pinching the blade (no splitter).

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try coating your cutter with some petroleum jelly.
Maple has a sugar-like compound in it that carbonizes when heated and the lubrication helps to retard this.

Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

...long ago when carbide was a potential, we used WD40 to lube blades when doing alot of Skilsaw ripping. That technique stuck with me and I use the stuff to this day when called for...like when ripping maple or any super dense wood. While the substance may help (and it does) there is no substitute for a *steady* and consistent feed. When preparing to rip longer material, I always review my footwork and hand positioning...burns still occur on occasion, though, so leaving a little extra to re-rip or joint is good CYA. ;0-)
cg

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.