How to cut miters on wide, long pieces?

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What is the best technique for cutting 45 degree miters on piece 6" or so wide (too wide for my miter saw), for something like a base trim piece of a cabinet? Also this would be on a long piece approx. 6' long, so it's not easy to do on the tablesaw (with any technique I know anyway)..
Look at the bottom of this piece and you'll get an idea of what I'm trying to make (though I think mine is wider):
http://www.konteaki-furniture.co.uk/images/reclaimed-pine-buffet-hutch.gif
Cheers
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On a table saw with a sled
Len "
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How do you support the opposite end and keep the piece moving uniformly through the blade? It's a 6' piece. I only have 20" or so of table to the left of the blade.
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Use a couple of roller supports, and rest the workpiece on a board that travels along the rollers? With a good grip, I've done this. Tom
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Clamp the work to the sled and add counterweight to the other side of the sled.
I dado 8' long bookcase sides using this method, with fantastic results.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Make a tall miter box and use a handsaw.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pH434&cat=1,240,45313
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That looks good but I think I might make my own. 45 degrees is the easy angle. Take a board 8' long and another 8' and make one out of that. The length from the 'bolt' that pivots them to the same point on the end of each must be matched and of equal length.
Now you have a very accurate angle. Shorter is less and the 4" ones used in school are less than all.
This will mark the line. It can be adjusted parallel to the line to guide the saw but you might have saw guides already.
Martin
DGDevin wrote:

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Or get a speed square at any hardware store for 1/4 the cost...
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Doug Miller wrote:

I have one of these and it works great, lets me nail the angle and it's thick enough to function as a cutting guide for a circular saw or jig saw. I use speed squares all the time, but I sure can't hit 15 cut after cut with one. And it was on sale and the wife was with me when I bought it, you can't walk away from a situation like that.
http://www.chhanson.com/pivotsquare.html
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2009 15:10:09 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

Probably the best tool is a radial arm saw or sliding miter. The cuts can be made a tablesaw using a home-made panel cutter with a runner. Without either of these, you could build a wooden miter box (that can be clamped down) and use a backsaw to made the cuts. Not the best choice, but a circular saw might do the job with some kind of fence setup or jig. Use a sharp blade.
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By miter saw do you mean compound miter saw?
If so you can get a little more out of it by raising the piece you are cutting by putting another piece of wood under it. This raises the work piece nearer to the center of the blade instead of the bottom.
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It's a compound miter saw, but stand the piece up on it's edge, the blade will not cut through it (too tall). Too wide to cut layed down even on another piece as well.
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Circular saws can often be tipped 45 degrees, so you might be able to make the cut with one. I'd consider a circular saw cut in this case to be a rough cut, and finish using a hand-held belt sander.
The easiest answer would be to find a larger saw. You need a sliding CMS or a radial arm saw for this cut. The cheapest would be to use a hand saw with a miter gauge.
Puckdropper
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.

This really needs a diagram, but for a long piece that is difficult to machine, try the following:
Knock up a U-shaped 'mitre box' with one end angled at 45deg.
Across the top of the box fit a bridge piece.
With the job in the box, make a wedge to fit between the work and the bridge.
Use a smoothing plane, guided by the box ends to whip off the waste in no time at all.
Jeff.
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Jeff:
If I am reading your post correctly, I think I watched someone use this method once. It was kind of like a variation on a shooting board, only the person demonstrating used a low angle block plane. One of those 2 hour seminars at a Woodworking show I paid some money to see. (I didn't expect him to bring his best and sharpest plane to such a show / demonstration so that maybe why the block plane.)
Amazing results, when done by an experienced pro with a very sharp plane. Not all that time consuming, if done by an experienced pro.
But gosh, that technique usually requires a few "Mulligans" the first time a woodworker tries it on his / her own. Not for knot free straight grain black-cherry wood 8' long board first time out. Trust me on the "Mulligan" do-over bit.
Phil
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Take your pick, depending on what's available to you:
- radial arm saw - sliding compound miter saw - portable circular saw with a guide clamped across the board
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How about using a router with a guide bushing, using a drafting tri- angle as a template?
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A 6" wide fence, a couple of clamps, and a Swanson Speedsquare and a sharp blade in a circular saw.
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That one is easy. Use a track saw such as a Festool TS-55 and you can cut your 45 degree miters as wide as you want, a miter 8' long is easy with one of these. You will also find it needs no cleanup after cutting.
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