How to cut 16" miter joint?


I am building a 16" deep stand. The top and sides will be a miter joint. My RAS will only cut 15.5". Any way to get that extra half inch? If it were a 90 cut I would just flip it over, but you can't do that with a 45. And no, I can't do it on my TS. I have an oversized motor on it, and it sticks out above the table when set to 45. I found that out the hard way; ran into the motor when I was concentrating on the blade.
I am thinking about moving the fence back an inch and putting a 1" shim in. Then putting a fence on the table perpendicular to the regular fence. Making my cut and locking the saw all the way back, removing the shim and completing the cut by sliding the work back against the perpendicular fence and repeating the cut.
Yeah, its half-assed, but I can't think of a better alternative. Well, other than telling the customer it has to be 15.5"; or just doing it that size, I doubt anyone would ever know.
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You can move the fence or spin the board 90 degrees raise the blade, position the blade and lower the blade into the dado for fit, raise the blade push it back and make your cut.
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skill saw and a strait edge. or finnish the cut with a router and a chamforing bit and a strait edge. how much does the motor stick up? if not a lot you could make a sled smaller than the 16" required and let the piece overhang the sled.
skeez
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I've done just what you suggest with the fence... it works. Just be careful to make sure that the blade still remains behind the face of the fence and you should be OK.
John
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Toller wrote:

Use a handsaw? Maybe a chisel?
Chris
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Toller wrote:

You may be able to raise the wood up off the saw table (put a piece of scrap under the work piece), this may give you a little more usable blade width and may get the extra 1/2".
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bing bing bing, we have a winner. Yes, I moved the fence back 3" and put a half inch of plywood on the table, it gave me the extra room I needed. Thanks much.
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in.
fence
Why not use a circular saw with a guide?
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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wrote:

I second that. I had a similar situation, bought a very good blade for my PC circular saw, carefully clamped on a guide and the cut was as good as I could have made on my RAS.
Frank
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Two 8" boards and glue em up after cutting the miters?
-Leuf
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make it in 2 pcs. 8" each and glue them together. ross <www.highisandexport.com>
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If you cut the stock at 90d first on the table saw, then set the TS to 45, the little triangle of wood ripped off may clear the motor.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Toller wrote:

I'd cut it by hand. Clamp a straight piece of wood on the cut line and use a sharp saw. Clean up with a jack or jointer plane.
R
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Toller wrote:

Set the RAS up to rip and do it that way.
--

dadiOH
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Toller wrote:

<snip>
Actually, yes, and to accomplish other goals, too, maybe.
I took Ian Kirby's advice and made a simple sled jig to hold work at 45 deg to table. His main argument is that contractors' t/s-s have such flimsy links between angle-adjusting trunnions that you get the arbor located to do 90 deg. and make jigs to cut at all other angles.
Made eminent sense to me, even for my Hitachi, or Maki/ta t/s. Jigs for 45, tenoning, and 10deg (raised panels) need only to clamp the work, set the fence, and set blade ht.
You need to cut longer pieces, you make longer sled jig. (Within reason.)
J
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snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

Even on a "good" table saw I think jigging is the way to go. You spend a little time on the jig and get it right and then everything goes quickly and safely. And then you have the jig forever - and can crank out your miters in a snap.
JP
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Amazing variety of great ideas; thanks all.
I got my panels glued up today, so tomorrow I will cut the miters; some how.
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