How to create a large raised panel without using a huge bit?


I saw some raised panels cut with a large Grizzly bit. I like the looks, it's a bevel and bead. However, the router bit is gigantic, on the order of 3-1/16" in diameter. That would scare me even with a Porter Cable 7518 in a table. That is a BIG bit.
The profile looks like this: http://www.grizzly.com/products/c1410 - as you can see, the 12 degree face is unusual. Add the bead in that position and it's an interesting job.
How would you do this profile without using that giant router bit?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some companies make vertical raised panel bits. Instead of a bit that's 1.5 inches radius, it's 1.5 inches tall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I doubt you can do it with a set of small cutters, unless you have one made. But for a trivial example of what you're after, see the
http://patwarner.com/images/edgeguide1.jpg pix link.
Do understand, (and I agree with your safety concerns) that big cutters in small routers are a common occurrence. Fence Safety measures are possible. Tho not clear in this picture, you can isolate yourself from the cutter. (Pix link = http://patwarner.com/new_pix.html )
http://www.patwarner.com (Routers) _______________________________________ snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@patwarner.com wrote:

So where would I have a bit made? I'd prefer a vertical bit for safety - where would I go to have this made?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3 Aug 2006 11:08:32 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I would do the 12 degree portion on the table saw, and then try to find a small roundover bit that doesn't have a bearing at the bottom.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This sounds promising. I'll try to visualize it. The first part makes sense, cut a 12 degree face. The second part - how does that work? The bead is about 3/16" or so, I would suppose it could be a little bigger or smaller without ruining the effect.
I thought I would end up trying to use a beading bit on an angle. More trouble.
Leuf wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

you've gotten a couple of good replies.
you could get to this panel look, or at least pretty close, with a table saw for the bevel followed by a non-bearing roundover bit on the router table. <http://www.grizzly.com/products/c1318>
it's more work, but does let you avoid swinging a giant bit in the router.
for that matter, you could drop back 500 years and punt. google "panel raising plane"...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
By the time you remove the dia. of the guide you only have apx 1 1/4 cut. which is very easy to do on the table saw @ 12 degrees as mentioned by someone else. you could use a scratch block for the round over.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a P-C 7539 router and use a 3-wing Eagle America bit at 10,000 rpm.
http://www.eagleamerica.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_186-4735_A_Raised+Panel+Bits+%2D+Large
One of the key things that I did not see on the Grizzly site was the rated speed of the bit. The Eagle America site says 12,000 rpm max. That's probably also appropriate for the Grizzly. One problem is that power is proportional to the square of the speed, so if it's truly a 3-1/4 HP router at 22,000 rpm, it's about a 3/4 HP router at 10,000 rpm. The Eagle site says, you'll have to make many light passes. This is the reason. It'll bog down.
It takes me about 6-8 passes in red oak. I do full depth (bit raised as high as I want the final cut to be) and move the fence for each successive cut. This keeps the panel from riding up on the bit.
FWIW, I'm not happy with this router, but, it's what I have.
The vertical panel raiser bits will allow a greater speed and therefore allow a heavier cut.
All in all, a shaper is the best way, but I don't own one either.
Hope this provides some insight. Roger
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No 120 volt router on the market will produce even 2.5 horsepower. Throw that into the mix.

router
bog
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Veatch <.> wrote:

That may be true for a synchronous motor with a variable speed drive but routers generally have universal motors and control the RPM by reducing the available power rather than by adjusting the frequency of the signal.
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
True they have universal motors but the speed control does not act like a simple rheostat. They slow the rpm by pulsing the power, full power pulses. Most have feedback circuitry to maintain rpm under load.

the
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Veatch <.> wrote:

Cutting the AC waveform off at a certain voltage level, which reduces both the voltage available and the current.
There's a discussion at <http://www.ubasics.com/node/12/print . The principle is the same as for a Triac/SCR/Thyristor light dimmer.
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Shaper.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What are you scared of? Do it is 10 tiny passes if you like.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.