how to create 1-1/2" radius for full length of a door?


Just wondering what a good way to create this 1-1/2" radius along the length of a wooden door on the hinge side. See photo.
a) mark up the lines on the door and go at it with a power planer? b) is there a router bit that would accomplish this? c) anything else?
http://mysite.verizon.net/vze3jrb8/rad.jpg
Thanks for you input Mike
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Half-right IMO :-) change "power" to "hand" though.

Possibly. Have you checked Google? Places to try might be leevalley.com grizzly.com woodline.com mlcs.com

Guide lines and a spokeshave.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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oo Mike oo (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| Just wondering what a good way to create this 1-1/2" radius along | the length of a wooden door on the hinge side. See photo. | | a) mark up the lines on the door and go at it with a power planer? | b) is there a router bit that would accomplish this? | c) anything else?
Best way would be to track down a router bit. (I checked MLCS but didn't find.)
Failing that, I think I'd try making a radiused strip (like a molding) that could be glued to the square edge of the door. If it's a one-of-a-kind project, I think I'd try it with a hand plane.
In my shop I'd cut it with a 1/2" round nose bit on the CNC router. If there's a CNC wood shop near your location, you could have them cut it for you.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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Can be done on the router table if you can hold on to the booger. A set up shown at the jointing link: http://www.patwarner.com/routertable_jointing.html
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I would use an Amana 49526 http://www.toolking.com/productinfo.aspx?productid607
But of course, I have an Amana 49526. But fortunately for you, I am willing to sell it. New, it is $172 at Tool King. My slightly used one, in perfect condition is $100 delivered. (well, assuming you are in the lower 48...)
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Yeah, the bit is prolly the best way. However, for a one-off and you don't wanna epay for a moulding plane, I'd start like the guys mentioned above with a plane/shave but finish with a sharp scraper made to the radius you need.
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Both of these would require two passes. These are a LOT of bit for a 1/2" shank. They're round-over bits. The full Bullnose bits stop at 3/4" radius.
Velepec 22-410 about $150.00
Amana: AMA-49526 1-1/2" radius $ 146.74
Personally, I'd use a hand plane and a sander... you know the drill, buy a new one, I'm sure Steve Knight can fix you up. <G>
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Mike,
Any method that has you hoisting the door up and moving it, is going to be painful and probably require additional stands and maybe a helper, especially if its a heavy door. I personally could see myself sneezing right in the middle of moving the door and taking a big old gouge with that BIG high speed router bit.
Look at the measurements. You're taking off about 1/4" at either corner of the edge. Drill a 1 1/2" hole in board and cut it in half as a contour guide. Set your door on edge against the bench, mark a line along either edge as limits. Hand plane with eyeball calibration and get very close. Use your contour guide to check along the length of the door. Finish if off with some sanding and I bet it nobody would ever be able to see the difference without a micrometer. This would be a 15 minute procedure that has no chance of hurting your back or making a big gouge by accident.
Bob
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BillyBob wrote:
"oo Mike oo"

Make a radius gauge from a piece of 1/4" hardboard.
Clamp door with work surface up.
Use a hand plane to remove material checking with gauge as you go.
Final finish with a fairing board which is a piece of plywood about 4" wide x 48" lg with a piece of 60 grit paper attached with rubber cement and a couple of handles attached.
When your arms feel like they are ready to fall off, you're done <G>.
Lew
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On Fri, 14 Oct 2005 15:45:25 GMT, Lew Hodgett

this is how I'd do it.
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On Fri, 14 Oct 2005 12:21:15 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@all.costs wrote:

Thanks guys, that gives me some good ideas to go on! This is definitely a one time project so I'm not crazy about using a big old router bit to screw up an expensive door. Router isn't my favorite tool anyhow, not enough experience with it yet.
I hadn't thought of using a contour gauge and the fairing board sounds like a good idea. That will give me time to screw up the door over a longer period of time :), just kidding, heh heh.
Thanks, Mike
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Cool. I learned something new.
Bob
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BillyBob wrote:

A fairing board AKA long board is a standard piece of equipment to finish out the hull of a boat.
Used with a fairing batten which marks out the low and high spots, you can get very smooth compound curves.
A strong back and arms are a must.
Lew
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Use 1 1/2" radius corner (1/4) round and run the doorr through your table twice. Lot's of companies make them. Here is Amama http://www.amanatool.com/bits/49492.html . Last bit in the first section.
The side benefit of spinning a bit that big is it will create enough wind to cool doewn the shop too.
BW
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