How to control/reduce speed of drill press

Page 2 of 2  
David Nebenzahl wrote:

And so does the guy I was responding to. If /you/ understood what he was saying, I'd be just as happy to hear the explanation from you.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"if it isn't too small" was a line I tossed in to point out that the capabilities aren't infinite. It related more to the bit size than anything. In fact, I use a .125 to make a .5 hole, in the matter you describe, rather than plunging a full .5 straight in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robatoy wrote:

O ye of little faith! :)
I felt the same until the day I chucked up a 1/32" bit and let 'er rip at the same feed rate I use for 1/4" bits (I did increase the spindle speed a bit) and discovered that it's /all/ about cutting the wood out of the way.

I'm not surprised. The implications for hand-held routers is clear: It's possible to use a bushing and template to accurately "drill" about any size hole the same size or larger than the bit being used. Deeper holes just need more passes - true regardless of the type of router being used.
[ Note to Dave: There's nothing elitist about CNC - it's just another tool technology, and can generally be DIY'd for less than the cost of the conventional tooling it replaces. You're invited to follow the link in my sig to see an example/proof. ]
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What? YOU don't have a CNC? (Truth be told.. Morris has two...TWO, I tell ya!)
Some of us in here actually make a living with woodworking and woodworking related equipment. The fact that some evolve towards more precision and repeatability in output, in some cases require the procurement of more advanced technologies in order to fill the orders. IOW, you don't haul cattle feed in large quantities in a two-seater sports car. The fact that CNC's are really shiny and make cool noises....well, that's done deliberately by the designers to generate large quantities of envy in others. That includes twirling chickens.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robatoy wrote:

The finished hole or the cutting bit?
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The template and router solution sounds good to me for another reason. With a hole saw you might end up wasting a lot of time trying to dislodge the cut out piece from the hole saw. Those cut outs have a way of refusing to backout, you may end up having to take the bit out of the chuck more than you'd care to so that uyou can drill another hole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for all the good advice - I'm considering the best solutions given here and other forums and I'll let you know how things work out.
Les
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1/3 HP and a 3-1/2" hole saw in maple? The second that hole-saw hits the wood, things will come to a dead stop. BTDT. Even a proper 3/4 HP to 1 HP DP with reduction down to 200 RPM would make that a tedious, smoky job. Morris' suggestion is by far the better choice. (As per usual <G>)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

1/3 HP and a 3-1/2" hole saw in maple? The second that hole-saw hits the wood, things will come to a dead stop. BTDT. Even a proper 3/4 HP to 1 HP DP with reduction down to 200 RPM would make that a tedious, smoky job. Morris' suggestion is by far the better choice. (As per usual <G>) ============================= Yep, I had to drill lots of holes in metal with a hole saw. The job needed to be done within a day or two and I was on a very short timeline. And the drill was too fast too. My solution was to just squirt lots of lube on the thing and wear a mask with a fan going over the work. It smoked like a chimney. It got the job done. I went out and bought a proper drill press after that job.
We can all make do. But the proper tool can make pleasurable what was total agony before. BTDT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lee Michaels wrote:

Well, yes - but I just didn't have enough guts to point out just how quick and easy the hole job would be if LesT would apply the crowbar and bring home a CNC router...
:)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had the same thought...but suppressed it.. <G> (Hole saw? What hole saw?? You mean the one that makes elliptical holes?)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You probably won't ruin the bit running it too fast. Just pull out every second or so and let it cool off. You will probably make smoke and possibly burn marks on the wood... But you can hand sand them off.
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Secondary thoughts... I didn't notice the fact that it was a 1/3 HP motor. Ouch. Terribly underpowered. Might be able to do it, but it's gonna be tough especially if the glue in the ply gummifies.
Now... The bit spinning that quick is scary enough, but a hand drill spins it that quick anyhow so... You get my point I hope? Clamp everything down well and wear safety gear.
Now.. If the budget allows, but a better DP:
Delta DP400 or 17-900 (3/4 HP $400) Jet JDP-17MF (3/4 HP $550) Grizzly #G7944 (3/4 HP $325) Grainger #3Z917 (1/2 HP $650) Jet JDP-20MF (1-1/2 HP $1100) Grizzly #G7948 (1-1/2 HP, $625) Grainger #3Z919 (1 HP, $1100) Ellis #9400 (2 HP, $2000-3000 - Ask for dealer pricing) Grizzly #G0521 [Drill/Tap Machine] (2 HP, 3 Phase, $1250)
Personally I love the G0521 option except for the fact that changing speeds sucks. Their design makes it tedious at best.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com Production Tapping: http://Production-Tapping-Equipment.com / Flagship Site: http://www.Drill-N-Tap.com VIDEOS:
http://www.youtube.com/user/AutoDrill

V8013-R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Joe AutoDrill" wrote

The only hand drill you want to use for any hole saw above 2" diameter is a right angle one with a 200 RM setting.
Unless of course, you don't give a hoot about your wrists and the hurt you inflict on them when that hole saw binds, which it will.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Most of us have two hands.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have this on my whole house fan motor. http://www.kb-controls.com/product.sc?productId 4&categoryId%
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

This is quite possibly an insane idea. As in dangerous, and won't work either. But, I'll suggest it anyway and you can decide if it's as insane as I think it is.
Get a Lazy Susan bearing:
http://tinyurl.com/ogo9b9
Screw a piece of plywood on either side. Clamp the bottom piece to your drill press table, with the center of the bearing lined up with the center of your chuck (a little tricky, but not impossible). Clamp your workpiece to the top piece of plywood.
Carefully lower the quill until it just makes contact with the workpiece. Apply just enough friction to the workpiece to let it spin at 400 RPM. The holesaw is spinning at 620, the work is spinning at 400, the difference is 120 RPM!
Probably not something you really want to try, but fun to think about, in a sick sort of way.
Personally, I'd go with the idea already suggested elsewhere -- rough-cut with a bandsaw, then clean up with a router and template bit. Or maybe just a sanding drum?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

See if you can find a turntable that will turn at 480 rpm in the same direction.
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I hate to say this, but I'd replace the drill press with one that has more speeds. You need slower speeds for cutting metals and other hard materials. I recommend a floor model for maximum flexibility. I use two cone pulleys under the hood to change speeds when I need it. I typically use 1000 rpm (for wood and large-radius tools) and 300 rpm for metals and stone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A project in itself, but some have modified a drill press (or band saw) for low speed operation by adding a third speed reduction pulley via a jack shaft, thus: http://home.comcast.net/~glyford/js/js.htm or http://www.geocities.com/Eureka/Account/3074/Equipment/DrillPressUpgrade/DrillPress.html or http://www.metalwebnews.com/manuals/large-hole-drilling.pdf
You might also find a couple of these clamps handy to keep the workpiece under control on the drill press table: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber6221
I just made a bunch of 4" diameter half-moon cut-outs in 2 x 4" material by clamping two workpieces edge to edge, then centering the hole saw on the joint, clamping the whole assembly to the drill press table (with a sacrificial wood spacer underneath) and sawing thru.
Sometimes a ~1/4" hole drilled tangent and just inside the saw kerf to provide a place for the sawdust to escape makes the operation easier.
David Merrill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.