How to clean plastic-bristled brush used for applying polyurethane? (Ecofriendly process preferred ...)

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On Fri, 3 Jun 2011 23:14:49 -0700, "Edward Hennessey"

Ah, thanks!

(couple?? Lots, thank you!!)

<smile> That's so very kind, thank you! <g>Now there you've gone and made me feel all mush! <vbg>
Thanks for the excellent help. I read all this and all a great education all at once! Thanks. I've never had the need to paint/strip, etc., so this is new territory and was a bit intimidating. Dad did give me a couple of pointers before he flew out of the country but I haven't wanted to bother him for more since he's got so much on his plate. So thanks much! Much appreciated.

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wrote:

F:
Either you are surrounded by flying monkeys in bell hop suits while disappearing under a tall, pointed hat or the alarm bells is setting to fire off at an inopportune moment.

In parting, I recollected and collected a few more mentions. Anything can be intimidating without experience, so maybe these will spur you to that:
*Do thorough preparation. Scrape off any fragmenting covering until the surface is stable. Sand to smooth any irregularities you don't want to see, to give "tooth" to a slick surface, to get past any surface "chalking".
*Clean with a light mix of water, ammonia and alcohol if your surface is dirty. If it is nastily grimy, you will need a detergent/water/alcohol mix. Alcohol is a solvent but it is vital to speed drying. Don't saturate bare wood. Wet wood doesn't paint well. Rinse the wood with water and alcohol. Let it dry.
*Paint/varnish along a wet line. On a hot day or big things this is important. If you return to extend finished surface that has dried to the point your new brushing will disturb it, you wont like it.
*Don't paint in the hot sun if you can time it otherwise. Unless you like bubbles.
Bon chance,
Edward Hennessey

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wrote in messageF:
Here's the midnight oil final amendment.

An appropriate solvent like mineral spirits can be used as a cleaner, especially after you have sanded a surface. The benefit of volatile solvents--aside from what they dissolve or carry away--is that they air dry pretty quickly. Aqueous solutions , to contrast, can raise the grain for awhile if the wood gets sopped.
Our Paleolithic relatives daubing murals in the caves of Lascaux didn't have to go through all this rigamarole. Wait a minute. Didn't they have to prospect and trade for rocks, find rare plants, face fierce beasts and trade with hostiles just to have a paint box? Nevermind.
Have fun with the project.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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Ammonia is cheaper than mineral spirits. Soak the brush in a 1:4 ammonia:water mix and rinse clean outdoors.
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I mixed some kerosene with some lacquer thinner in a pickle jag, drilled a hole in the brush handle (to allow suspending it in the solution) and hung the brish over night ('till ready for the next coat).
But that reading the label idea is not bad either.
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