How to care for tools?


As I am just starting out, I don't know all the ins and outs of caring for tools. In the past, I have just let tools sit in garage. As result, I have found rust of a few of my tools, such as screw drivers and pliers.
I have slowly gotten into woodworking. Slowly as in have some money for tools OR wood, but not both. So I am at that stage of collecting tools (the best part of woodworking, right?), and am wondering what is the proper way of caring for tools? This includes hand tools and power tools? What about cast iron table saw tops?
Thanks in advance,
- Clayton
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Lot's of different things to consider but, for me - I use both a non silicon wax and a product called Boeshield to protect my tablesaw, jointer, etc. I also cover them at the end of the day and try to remove any sawdust from the flat surface. Hand tools, generally get Boeshield or WD-40 and lightly wiped. Everyone has their individual preferences so you should get some good suggestions.
Good luck,
Vic
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Vic Baron wrote:

One of the keys for me is to make sure each tool has a home. By that I mean a dedicated shelf, cubby, slot, nail on the wall or case where each tool gets returned to when I'm finished with it. I like my tools exposed and visible, personally, so I can quickly get to them and quickly see if something is missing. Trouble starts when you've got a pile of tools all banging together getting pushed this way and that to make room for something else you've acquired. Organize!
JP
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wrote:

If you were to have seen my garage, you may have a heart attack. But it IS better. Slowly trying to get organized. Right now, it is the stack of 2x4's and lumber on the floor that is always in the way that is the big blocker for getting things organized.
All my father's tools were always in boxes banging and scratching each other. And of course, like father like son. But now that I am older and wiser, I am trying to actaully take care of the tools I have inherited and new ones I am collecting.
- Clayton
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Johnson's Paste Wax
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On Fri, 30 Jun 2006 00:01:56 GMT, "R. Pierce Butler"

Do you put the wax on hand tools as well as saw tops?
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It depends.
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When I was in the appartment stage in my life, things had to go in tool boxes. For small tools, I still do that -- model making, electronic, etc. I now have things up in my workshop area on peg boards. I can see them, and they are ready at hand. I also have a small tote box that get loaded up with stuff when I have a household project, then the tools get returned to the bench.
I make it a point to have any edged tool -- chisel, saws, etc., hanging free so that it doesn't damage the edge. Boxes for small stuff, cans of paint, etc. Everything in its place, as one poster said.
Specialized stuff like bike to automotive tools do have a separate box. I like the plastic ones, as they cushion things a bit. Sportsman's "Dry boxes" for tool sets in the car. They have a rubber "O" ring that keeps moisture and dirt out.
The guy who dies with the most tools wins...
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wrote:

Sounds like you have a moisture issue. Keep your tools in air-tight boxes or cases when not in use. Wipe them occasionally with a rag that has a few drops of kerosene in it. There are special sprays you can use on the saw table tops, or you can polish it using Johnson's paste wax. I polish my cast iron tops once a month, although weekly is better. You can put a 3 watt bulb under the cast iron table to keep it slightly warmer than the surroundings--that will help drive moisture away.
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Phisherman wrote:

Umm, no, that'll draw moisture. As soon as a cooler draft comes in the table will almost grab that moisture right out of the air.
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A tool in the garage cycles between warm and cold often: the tool gets cold, say overnight, then the weather heats up, and the humidity rises simultaneously. The tool retains the cold longer than the air, and the humidity of the air condensates on the tool.
Also never leave anything in a spray can in a cold garage. The can will be useless. An open top container, depends on whats in it that counts.
-
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