How to build replacement sash and casement windows ????????

Hi, I have a 1920's home that has sah and casement windows that have a million coats of paint on them. Rather than struggle trying to strip lead based paint I was considering making replacements so I'm lookig for a site that will show plans and techniques for building sash and casement windows. Any and all help appreciated. Mike
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Strip the paint !
Even if it's lead based, paint is easy to strip with modern chemical strippers. There's a lead hazard if you do it with a blowtorch and scraper or by sanding, but not if you do it chemically.
BTW - A Stanley #75 plane is almost useless for planing, but it's perfect for getting the paint out of mouldings and rebates.
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http://mrsawdust.com
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Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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miey wrote:

I'd sure investigate the paint-stripping first if the windows are in good shape otherwise--for one thing, they (I assume) are the originals and there's value in that--at least for many.
If you decide to build/replace, two sources of info I recommend...
1. Delta has a good publication (sorry, I don't have it at hand to give part no) that has full discussion of "cope and stick" construction...
2. CMT has an instruction sheet w/ their window sash router bit set that isn't quite as easy to set up/use, but is more attuned to use of router vis a vis shaper...this one is online...
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I have a copy of the book. It is "Getting the Most Out of Your Shaper". It is a 1954 copyright. It was published by Rockwell Manufacturing Co, Delta Power Tool Division. I found it with a Google search in the used book vendors.
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Sorry about the double post, but a 1936 version of the book is at http://www.toolsrules.com/ORIG-CAT.htm
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Lowell Holmes wrote: ...

...
The publication I was referring to may have been a portion of the book reprinted but it's just a multi-page (4?, 6?, I don't recall) handout on cope and stick construction specifically of doors and windows that used to be distributed w/ their shapers...it's in the shop, I'll try to remember to get the data on it and see if I can find out if Delta still will supply it...it actually is <quite> good although I don't doubt the info in the book is also plus more, to boot, undoubtedly.
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Try alt.home.repair also

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I've been down that road already. Have you considered sending the sashes out to a stripping facility? It's not a bad option if you are doing just a few sashes at a time and you can live with plywood over the openings for a few days. Sending the old sashes out beats makinge new ones by a mile. That of course assumes that the sashes are worth saving...
Making new sashes is not too difficult with a very stout router in a table or a shaper. The cutters are easy to find. Go to www.oldhouseweb.com and check out their boards and preservation briefs.
It's nice to hear that you aren't just wanting to slap some vinyl monstrosity up in place of the original window. Old double hungs, properly weatherstripped and with wooden storms, are quite nice on those cold Ohio winter nights we are still experiencing.
Jim
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You might want to get a copy of John Birchard, "Make you own Handcrafted Doors and Windows", Sterling, 1988 ISBN 0-8069-6544-4.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
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I made mine. Even though I enjoy woodworking, would I do it again? Maybe, but probably not. Its just something a factory can do so much cheaper and due to the basic function of windows, its difficult to add any personal touches to.
Picture of mine.
http://www.teamcasa.org/workshop/images/windows1.jpg
Dave
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There's a few pics on my webite
www.nbjoinery.net
New site and I'm going to put section details up there in the next few days...
Cheers
Nicholas
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Nicholas Buttle - Quality Joinery and Cabinet Making
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"Nicholas"

Nice stuff Nicholas. However, it looks like your shop is in cave! If I had your single tenoner, I would not hesitate to make more windows. However, my next big machine may be a TIG welder or a Multi-Router.
Ah - so many tools - Hmm, what project can I start to justify buying more tools!
Dave
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Thanks to everybody for the adviice. I have a question, if you send them out to be stripped do you have to remove the glass? Also, the windows I want to replace are double hung sash with no lites. I'd love to know what problems I'm likey to get should I choose to make my own. MikeOn Thu, 10 Mar 2005 20:03:05 -0000, "Nicholas"

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"miey" said

If the glass is single pane, I'd just remove it unless its antique glass. If you are going to make your own, make sure you leave extra material for final fitting, cut the window so it will accommodate dual glazed panels.
Dave
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Teamcasa, Thank you, I not sure what I would need to do to make them dual glazed. Make the rabbet deeper ? Mike
wrote:

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miey wrote:

...
"No" lites??? Or you mean just a single pane (that would be one lite)?
RE: potential problems...what material do you want to use? I had a heckuva time finding 5/4 clear white pine (in fact, gave up) as apparently Andersen, et al., have a near lock on the market (at least unless you're nearer areas where it is produced and have access to larger wholesalers than I have <easy> access to).
One real pita imo, is that it is very difficult to find the stub-spindle cutter to make the matching cut for the sticking to make a traditional full-length rail tenon as opposed to the present stub-tenon. Delta was the only manufacturer of these for small shapers that I was aware of and they have ceased production (and are out of stock, I've checked). The only way at present to do this that I'm aware of is w/ the CMT router set, but it's somewhat more tricky of a set up than the Delta shaper set was. I've sent a profile to a custom house to see about getting a custom carbide replacement--when I get the quote back I'll post -- if there are others interested it might cut setup one-time cost down signficantly.
How are the windows hung--traditional weights/sash cord or more modern?
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Thank you, Weight and sash cord. The house is a Craftsman style and the windows are really very plain. No stubs or anything. Almost the same as a rail and stile kitchen cabinet panel door only with glass instead of a panel. mikeOn Thu, 10 Mar 2005 16:53:47 -0600, Duane Bozarth

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