how to build a worktable that can be leveled in middle of legs

I have a worktable that I need to keep level. Only problem is that the ground it stand on is not level so any shift brings me down to the floor to the tedious task of leveling each leg from the adjusters on the ground. I'd love to replace these legs with something that will allow me to level this table from the middle of the leg so I don't have to lift a quarter of the table off the ground each time I level a corner. Are there any products I can buy at a Home depot or specialty store that will do the trick?
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So cut a section out of as many legs as needed and insert a threaded rod into each section of the leg using the appropriate hardware. Weld a nut on the rod so you can turn it with a wrench.
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And then you'll have a table with four wobbly legs. I think you would need to have a telescoping leg, with a good 12 inches of overlap between the sections. But you'd need 3 arms to adjust it.
If the legs have stretchers connecting them, and a work table should, then the adjustment ought to be below the stretchers.
-Leuf
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I don't have an answer to your specific question, but a suggestion to make things a little easier if you don't find what you need. You could cut one leg (it can be the most easily accessible one) notable shorter than the other three and then that will be the only one needing an adjuster. If the adjuster can be turned with a wrench you won't need to lift the table if that leg needs to be lengthened because you can get enough force with the wrench so that the adjuster will do the work (you'll still have to get on your knees, though).
Charles
Joe wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Along the same vein ...
ASSUMING stout wooden legs ...
He could route (drill, blast, gnaw) a slot in a leg large enough to take a substantial carriage bolt .. 3/8" or perhaps 1/2".
Then he could cut that leg to make a wedge and tighten both pieces back together with that bolt and a couple washers on each side.
When he moved the table he could loosen the bolt, slide the wedge up or down to adjust and re-tighten the bolt.
Or not.
Bill
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" substantial carriage bolt "
1/2" Threaded rod? Available in 4' lengths. Clean through the leg and nut captured near the top with another welded to the exposed end would allow one to use a socket wrench to effectively lengthen or shorten the leg in question from the top.
Some guy in Wisconsin is bemused by all the "ink" this question has garnered - esp absent the response of the OP!
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

That would work if he just wants the leg bottoms to lie in a plane, for stability. But he says he wants the table top to be level. For that, he needs adjustability on all 4 legs.
Like JOAT said, more details would help.
Regards,
Mark
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redbelly wrote:

Uh, make that THREE of the legs need to be adjustable.
Mark
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On Fri, 15 Dec 2006 05:53:37 -0800, redbelly wrote:

Seems to me that a two pronged approach might be good. One leg with a leveler on the bottom to stabilize the base, and three with levelers on top to level the top.
Inset levels in the appropriate locations might be a useful feature.
If he doesn't want to get down on his knees the adjustable leg could be adjustable from the top--make it telescoping with the adjusting screw high up on the leg and bearing on a block in the crosspiece while threaded into an insert in the top of the extending piece--that way you could if you were careful with the workmanship fix it so that you can put a ratchet on it and leave it for an adjusting lever. Or you could make that leg adjust from the top with a threaded insert and a hex head machine screw with the head down in a hole in the end of the leg--adjust the base, put the top on, then level the top with three more screws.
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--John
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J. Clarke wrote:

That would work. At any rate, the adjusters should go either at the top or bottom, but not in the middle, of the legs.
I'm just not clear on what the OP's problem is. Is it with having to bend down low, or with having to lift the table? If lifting is the problem, a simple jack, or even a prybar + short wooden block (6" 2x4?), might solve the problem.
Mark
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It seems like it would be easier to level the top than the legs. You could use 4 machinist's jacks, one under each corner of the top.
Joe wrote:

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M Berger wrote:

Or alternately, some kind of cam arrangement in the frame around the edge of the base. Fix one corner (somehow...) and put cams at the two on the other side. The cams could be locked by tightening their bolts, and a lock washer would probably help. Or, you could try a tripod workbench.
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Tue, Dec 12, 2006, 9:51am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Joe) comes in and mumbles: I have a worktable that I need to keep level. Only problem is that the ground it stand on is not level so any shift brings me down to the floor to the tedious task of leveling each leg from the adjusters on the ground. I'd love to replace these legs with something that will allow me to level this table from the middle of the leg so I don't have to lift a quarter of the table off the ground each time I level a corner. Are there any products I can buy at a Home depot or specialty store that will do the trick?
Anytime I see one of those gmail.com addresses I check the posting history. Firt post here. Figures.
Assuing you're sincere, you din't provide enough details to really give a viable response.
First thought I had was, then don't move the work table. But, you don't say what size the table is, how sturdy it is, what you use it for. You say the ground is not level. Do you mean the floor you have it on? Or do you use it outside, on the ground? Details, details, details.
Actually, I came up with several possible solutions by the time I'd finished reading your post. Doesn't seem like you applied much thought yourself. But, because you did't include details, I don't know if any of them would work for you. Three legs, then it'll stand steady at least. Then you could have a double top and level just the top one. Adjustable legs - several home-grown options there, but seeing as how I don't know how sturdy or heavy the table is, don't feel like listing them all. If you're inside, and have to move the table, an option would be level the floor. Screw in legs would be one option. Sliding clamp legs another.
I don't know what Home Depot might have, but I doubt they'd have much. Haven't been in one in years, and don't plan on going in one. Lowes, OK; Home Depot, no.
JOAT Where does Batman buy gas for the Batmobile?
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Joe wrote:

of the table]
There are silly solutions, of course; fill a kiddie pool with water and put your table on a boat... screw the table top to a tilt head like on a photographer's tripod...
One possibility is to use hydraulic cylinders in each leg; lock 'em by closing a valve, unlock the legs that are too long (under table-weight load) until those legs are the right height. Industrial distributors carrying the Enerpac line might have something suitable, if you can afford it. Your table will have a hydraulic fluid reservoir, of course, in addition to the valves and cylinders.
Easier, is to use the adjustable feet that rotate in a threaded collar; if you can braze a long rod to the threaded foot, put a 3/8" socket head on the top, and you could jack the feet up or down with a ratchet wrench. Either bore the (solid) legs and put portholes in the table top, or weld up some outboard braces for the feet.
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It's overkill but this might accomplish your goal. Try four trailer tongue jacks mounted to the legs. They have a hand crank that will reduce bending and can be adjusted independently. If you get the ones with wheels, it will make it easy to move the table. I'm not too sure about the wobble factor, though.
See: http://www.easternmarine.com/em_store/jacks /
Tom
Joe wrote:

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I have most of my tools on casters. The method I use to level them is:
http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/ snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net/album?.dire1scd&.src=ph&store=&prodid=&.done=http%3a//pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/ snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net/my_photos
Max
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Max wrote:

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/ snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net/album?.dire1scd&.src=ph&store=&prodid=&.done=http%3a//pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/ snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net/my_photos

Looks good, except that I would put a metal plate or block of wood under the screw tips. I'd have expected over time the screws would gouge holes into the concrete floor. Have you had any problem like that happening?
Mark
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to show what I mean. Your suggestion is a good one where a floor might be questionable.
Max
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Max wrote:

Max, thanks for the info and added pics. -- Mark

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